Flies with spinning equipment?

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FishSchooler

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I've seen people fly fishing with spinning rods n reels... How do you cast? Just let like 20 feet of line dangle from the tip and cast it as if it were a fly line? is it possible to cast flies without the bubbles?
 
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18406ej

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My Way

My Way

I use a lightweight float that can be filled with water to adjust its weight for casting. To that I attach a light leader about 8' long (The approximate length of my bank-casting rod) and cast out with a whipping motion. I have had great success with this in lakes and rivers, and usually get the most bites as I slowly retrieve the fly. I know that some people also have had success using just a few split-shot ahead of the fly, but the float method has worked fine for me, and I like the casting distance that the float provides.
 
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FishSchooler

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Can these floats be made at home? A small vial of water or something? Ill be using dry flies, so a float kinda ruins it I think...
 
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18406ej

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The bubble floats are pretty cheap (like a dollar or two at Bi-Mart or Sportsman's Warehouse) and are made of plastic, so home manufacture may not be feasible. The neat thing about the bubble float is that you can adjust their weight just by adding more or less water.

I use the same set-up for wet or dry presentation with reasonable success. You can also check out the thread "Bubble and Fly Method" on page two under this heading for some more input on this.
 
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FishSchooler

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Oki, good info. Dont you need to er... Keep the dry fly from getting near the bubble? If so how?
 
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18406ej

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Sorry- I should have been more clear on my set-up method...I slide the bubble float onto my main line, and then attach a swivel to the end of the main line to keep the bubble from sliding down the leader. I then attach the leader, then the fly, and cast out. After casting the fly, I reel in a little bit which separates the bubble from the fly. This method works on running or still water.
 
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cavdad45

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I just use a bobber if I'm trying to cast flies with spinning gear. However, in a stream, I use a couple splitshots in front of a nymph or swimmer.
 
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FishSchooler

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Trout were jumpin. I put on an adams. Dry fly didn't float too long before slowly sinking. I caught a trout without a bobber by rowing out, dropping it, then going back to the shade while releasing line. It was getting annoying everytime we had to row out, so I just clipped on a regular bobber. Now, the trout didn't jump as soon as the bobber hit the water...
 
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18406ej

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Look for a product called dry fly floatant. It works great on keeping the flies on the surface.
 
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FishSchooler

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Well, instead of bubble floats, I'm thinking of sponge! Sooooo you're goin fishin, you break out the flies and spinning rod, then you take a handy dandy littly needle and poke it through the sponge with the line, then you tie a barrel swivel on, then a 2-4 foot leader on, then you tie your fly on. You soak the sponge, you wring the sponge until it's your desired weight! Then you give it a cast, and notice that the sponge hardly leaves a ripple when it hits the water! Unlike bubbles, sponges won't scare the fish away when it splashes! Its easy n cheap! Dont use the kind of sponge that you wipe dishes with. Good idea or not?
Edit: I just thought of a new idea for helping a fly float!
Take a fly and put a tiny chunk of powerbait on the hook cause powerbait floats!
 
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A

ArcticAmoeba

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Sponges absorb water fairly rapidly, and would sink...fairly rapidly. So I don't know how it would work for a float. PowerBait would surely ruin the presentation of a fly, and make it float upside down. There is a reason that they have made real fly flotant for so long...It works perfectly well dude. Even Mucilin for your line is better than PB. Not as effective as the good flotants, but better than dough man.
 
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FishSchooler

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That was like a joke.... I dont really fly fish.................................... with a fly rod....:D
My sponge, it is speciiiiiiiiiiiiiiially.... original. :D I left it in the water for like 20 min, no sink it did not!
 
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meluvtrout

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Fly & Bubble Rig For Lake Fishing
By Greg Howard

Lake fishing is perfect for flies this time of year...

But most of the time, the fish are jumping way beyond the range of the amateur angler.

Beginning trout fishermen are pretty apprehensive about fly fishing, thinking that they will have to make yet another expensive investment in equipment and gear. They just got the basics down with the spinning rod, and don't even want to think about learning an entirely different casting style and technique.

Fortunately, the clear plastic bubble opens up a new dimension of fly fishing for both the novice and amateur fisherman.

EQUIPMENT

The equipment is minimal:

spinning rod with 4-6# line
2-4# line for leader
clear plastic bubble
small swivel
assorted wet & dry flies
All of the above can be found at any supply store. The flies should be of good quality (avoid "discount" flies). The following are good "starter" flies to look for:

Dry flies: Ginger Quill, California Mosquito, Red Ant, Renegade, Royal Coachman, Black Gnat, White Miller, El Capitan, Adams Irresistible, Gray Wulff.

Wet flies: Wooly Worm (brown, olive), Wooly Bugger (black, black & olive, olive, brown), Joe's Hopper (grasshopper), Muddler Minnow.

Dry flies are intended to imitate bugs landing on the water surface. Some dry flies, like the Gray Wulff, can be rigged as a wet fly to imitate an insect submerged and drifting.

Wet flies imitate various shrimp and hellgrammites found in lake waters, as well as minnows and larval insects.

Overwhelmed? Get a few Adams for topwater, Wulffs for top & submerged, and Olive Wooly Worms & Buggers for submerged. Start with these and add to your collection as your enjoyment progresses.

RIGGING

1. Pull four feet of line from the rod tip to work with.

2. Slide the bubble on the line and tie one end of the swivel to the line. The bubble should be free to slide but will not pass over the swivel.

3. Measure leader and tie to swivel. Use six feet of line for submerged flies; use nine feet of line for dry flies.

Easy measuring technique: Use a tape measure and measure the span of your stretched arms (mine is six feet). Now pull line from left hand to right using the span as your guide (half span is at the tip of your nose).

4. Tie fly to end of leader.

5. Fill bubble with water.
Dry flies should use a bubble filled halfway with water to keep them afloat and to lessen the "plunk" when hitting the water.

Submerged flies need a bubble completely filled with water. The bubble will hold the fly at the same level throughout the retrieve.

CASTING

Cast the rig using a side-arm technique. Overhead casting may cause the leader to snag behind you or to whip and snap off. The side-arm lets the bubble lead and allows the fly to land without tension. Retrieve with the pole at the side so hooking the fish can be done with a snap of the wrist and arm.

Dry & wet flies should be retrieved very slowly as if the bug was drifting towards the shore with the waves. Slight twitching may be added to stimulate struggle. The bubble should make a slight wake to ensure sufficient tension on the line. Strikes will then be felt and distinguished over "bumps". The bubble also acts as a strike indicator, so watch it carefully to hook the smart fish.

Submerged flies are a different game. Before casting, drop the fly & bubble in the water and count as it sinks. Note the amount of seconds per foot. After casting, count off the depth using your predetermined seconds per foot gauge. Most submerged flies and streamers work best at 5-10' depth, but sometimes a greater depth might be desired. When at the depth chosen, the bubble will keep the fly at this level for the first three-quarters of the retrieve. The bugger or streamer will imitate a swimming action, so use a stop-&-go action or add slow pulls while reeling.

HOOKING

Use a very short set when you feel the strike. If the fish is missed, keep reeling slowly. Trout will often return for another look and a more vicious follow-up strike.

When a fish is hooked, it is important to keep constant pressure on the line to cut down on the possibility of the fish throwing the hook. Keep your line and rod tip near the water to minimize the chances of the trout becoming airborne. This creates a lot of surface tension between the line and water which makes it harder for the trout to leap with both the weight of the bubble and the wet line.

LANDING

Use a net or beach-land the trout. The leader is long and often tempts a novice to grab the line. The fighting fish is fighting the tension and action of the pole. If the line is grabbed, the spring action ends and the fish fights only the strength of the line. Nine times out of ten, the leader will snap. Rule of thumb: NEVER GRAB THE LINE! Play and tire the fish out, then land or net the trout.

CONTINUING

This form of fly fishing can become a productive strategy for catching trout in lakes. Often, the fish will be rising for flies, dimpling the surface a considerable distance off shore. The traditional fly rodder simply can't reach these trout unless floating in a tube. The bank angler who is proficient with a fly and bubble rig can really excel at putting on a great show. There's nothing like the thrill of landing a fighting trout amidst an audience of bait fishermen and considering whether or not to answer their question: "So, what's your secret?"

About the Author:

Greg Howard, Publisher
Flyhook: "Anglers Who'd Rather Fish than Surf."
 
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18406ej

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Thanks for all of the detailed info Meluvtrout. It will be used next time I go out.
 
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fish_4_all

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Here is what I have learned fishing with a bobber and fly up here.

I use a line called Remington braid for my mainline with a casting bobber. It is super limp and does not compact on the reel when catching fish. I also use an E-Glass rod at 6 foot. I also use the plastic adjustable bobber. With this setup I can cast as far as someone using 3/4 ounces of lead with an 8 foot rod and light line.

I then find where the fish are rolling, not jumping. This seems to be the best situation for me to catch fish with a fly. Once I see where they are rolling, I cast well past them, as far past them as I can. Just before the bobber hits the water I stop it so that the fly, on a good 8-10 foot leader will finish the cast and the bobber stops. I then wait for 10-15 seconds and start a very slow retrieve once I know the fly is in the rolling zone I stop the retrieve for 3-5 seconds and then start again. I use 4-6 pound test for the leader.

I thought that the bobber would scare the fish and they would not hit the fly but at least once every 10 casts the fish hit the bobber! If you find that the fish don't seem to hit, go to a smaller bobber and/or fill the bobber full enough that it just barely floats. I have used those bullet shaped solid casting bobbers with a fair amount of success although casting distance was not as good. Oh, and the clearest bobbers you can find work better in my experiences.

When using a dry fly I make sure that I have a slight wind, which works best using a bobbers and fly setup anyway up here. I then make sure I cast across the wind. In other words, I cast so that the wind is blowing left to right of the direction I cast. This make my fly float out of the track that the bobber makes. Usually, when fishing like this, the fish hit the fly when it floats to the edge of a wind rip in the water. This is what I call the area where the wind is making ripples and a calm spot. 9/10 hits happen there when I use a dry fly.

My favorite flies for this: a light olive marabou streamer in size 4 extra long and an ant pattern in size 6. I know the foam floats better but it also moves to the side of the retrieve really well and you can fish it in a lot of different ways that way.
 
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redhawk50

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Geez note the smiley! I was just playing because it was cracking me up that under the fly-fishing category it said flies with spinning equipment.
 
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fish_4_all

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There is a post I need to start. How to catch as many fish fly fishing as using a casting bobber and a fly.

I just wish I could answer it! :confused::redface:
 
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