Fall chinook/coho seasons

rogerdodger
rogerdodger
so they voted Friday to set the fall salmon seasons and we should get the results in the next couple weeks, as usual coho rules are tentative until NOAA gives their stamp of approval, but it sounds like our central coast rivers will again be a 1 per day/2 total for wild coho however it seems the wild coho season will be shorter in some rivers this year- sounds like some might be open just Sept.15 to Oct.15. Coho lakes and chinook should be open as usual under perm. regs. this year. "Salmon are coming!". roger

"The Commission also set wild coho salmon seasons for the Tillamook, Nestucca, Siletz, Yaquina, Alsea, Siuslaw, Umpqua, Coos and Coquille basins, Beaver and Floras creeks and Tenmile lakes (Siltcoos and Tahkenitch lakes remain open under permanent regulations).

Due to low projected returns, the Nehalem River will be closed to wild coho harvest in 2015, though anglers will be able to harvest hatchery coho thanks to an existing hatchery coho program on the river.

Daily and seasonal bag limits in open areas will be similar to recent years. However, because fewer Endangered Species Act impacts are available in 2015, seasons in some basins will be shorter than in 2013 and 2014. All proposed coho fisheries must be reviewed and approved by NOAA.

The 2015 Coastal Coho Fishing Regulations will be posted on the ODFW website by late June.

For the first time in several years, there will be no emergency regulations for coastal fall Chinook. Anglers should refer to the 2015 Oregon Sport Fishing Regulations booklet for those seasons."

http://www.dfw.state.or.us/news/2015/june/060515c.asp
 
GaryP1958
GaryP1958
Im ready and nice thing I got both my Coho last year from the bank 400 yards away in front by the Humane Society I think I will just walk this year!:thumb:
 
GaryP1958
GaryP1958
Got mine Sept 23 and 25 last year and I netted this for an old guy on Oct 14th so thats when they ran last year! 10653416_810209265685649_760600813356057584_n (1).jpg1796678_820624637977445_2416264870354192178_n.jpg
 
GaryP1958
GaryP1958
Just picked up a Mitchell Garcia 306 rebuilt and I will put it on an old Berkley Buccaneer 7 ft or an old Sabre I like old quality stuff no Chinese Okuma crap here!DSCN0520.JPG
 
jamisonace
jamisonace
Thanks Roger. I'm looking forward to those siuslaw coho again! Last year was incredible. I'm praying for the same again but I don't know that we'll see a run like that for awhile.

I'll be leaving the spinners at home and bringing the fly rod instead.
 
J
JeannaJigs
If they shut her down on Oct 15, it wont impact those getting them early in the tidewater, but that's going to suck for upriver fishing if this drought continues.

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B
BaldTexan
I find it very interesting that they've predicted a low return of coho in the Nehalem. Last fall there were so many wild coho in the Nehalem they were practically a nuisance since you could only bonk one....although I did have a blast catching them. Made it impossible to catch a nook! What do they base that predicted return on?


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J
JeannaJigs
They base it on escapement surveys from 4 years ago, as well as ocean conditions etc. Just because it was a good run last year, it doesn't mean a thing for this year.

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rogerdodger
rogerdodger
BaldTexan said:
I find it very interesting that they've predicted a low return of coho in the Nehalem. Last fall there were so many wild coho in the Nehalem they were practically a nuisance since you could only bonk one....although I did have a blast catching them. Made it impossible to catch a nook! What do they base that predicted return on?

We had a good presentation on this earlier in 2015 at a STEP meeting, as I recall, coho follow a predictable 4 year cycle and the returns for each river for each year of that cycle can swing dramatically due to local things that impact spawning/hatch/smolt survival from year to year. Things like badly timed floods or mudslides, spawning bed changes, drought... then overlaid on the local cycles are ocean conditions and harvest that impact all the rivers more or less equally. Over time, weak return years on rivers tend to recover towards normal levels after several normal cycles.

Not having seen the data, my guess is the Nehalem is coming up on a very low year in it's cycle, perhaps because of something that happened 4 or 8 or 12 years ago....
 
D
DrTheopolis
What Bladtexan said.

Was just about impossible to catch a nook in Nehalem Bay last fall. But caught both hatchery and wild coho like they were going out of style.
 
B
BaldTexan
Then the Nehalem nooks should have a better chance at chomping on my lures :)


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C
coyo7e
rogerdodger said:
We had a good presentation on this earlier in 2015 at a STEP meeting, as I recall, coho follow a predictable 4 year cycle and the returns for each river for each year of that cycle can swing dramatically due to local things that impact spawning/hatch/smolt survival from year to year. Things like badly timed floods or mudslides, spawning bed changes, drought... then overlaid on the local cycles are ocean conditions and harvest that impact all the rivers more or less equally. Over time, weak return years on rivers tend to recover towards normal levels after several normal cycles.
There's a term for this, called "Regression Toward the Mean." It applies to a wide range of subjects, from biology to one's level of play in a sports match, or a video game. ;)
 
S
steelhead_stalkers

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