What Rod wt would you recommed?

F

Fisherman.Z.

Member
Joined
Jan 8, 2009
Messages
41
Location
Salem
Im trying to figure how big of quarry i can handle on my 6 wt. i think just trout, but idk... whats the minimum anyone would recommend for say, steel head? like an 8?

im fairly new to fly fishing incase you can't tell, help is much appericiated.:D
 
F

FishFinger

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 27, 2008
Messages
1,217
Location
Central Oregon
Honestly, your 6 wt should be capable of landing a steelhead. A fatty steelie (10 to 14 lbs) might push you to your limits during the heat of the fight but with enough patience it will run out of gas. With lighter gear you'll have to choose your beaching site well if you didn't have a net handy.

Being said, I went from a 5 wt to an 8wt when I got a rod specifically for metalheads.

So when in doubt get both...
 
Raincatcher

Raincatcher

Moderator
Joined
Apr 15, 2008
Messages
4,705
Location
Less than 50 feet from the Santiam River! :)
Honestly, your 6 wt should be capable of landing a steelhead. A fatty steelie (10 to 14 lbs) might push you to your limits during the heat of the fight but with enough patience it will run out of gas. With lighter gear you'll have to choose your beaching site well if you didn't have a net handy.

Being said, I went from a 5 wt to an 8wt when I got a rod specifically for metalheads.

So when in doubt get both...

FF;
I stopped at a pawn shop to snoop around and found a Fenwick complete with a reel. They wanted $65 for it. Is that a good price and is it a good rod? I love pawn shops and thrift stores in the winter...spring...summer and fall...:lol:
 
F

FishFinger

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 27, 2008
Messages
1,217
Location
Central Oregon
I would say yes, get it.... Fenwick makes a great product.
 
R

redhawk50

Member
Joined
Jun 24, 2008
Messages
137
Location
Canby
I use an 8 for steelhead. You can catch any fish on any rod, the question is do you want to lol. I also have a 6 and a 5/6 for trout, smallies, perch etc. I really want to get a 3 or 4 wt. short rod so I can take it backpacking and hiking more. Then there is always the temptation of getting a spey rod...ahh the joys of being addicted to fly fishing.
 
A

ArcticAmoeba

Active member
Joined
Jun 5, 2008
Messages
973
Location
Oregon
Osmosis and I both have 5 wts. or 5/6 wts. but this year, I couldn't tell you how many 8-14 pound Coho were whacked with his fly stick. and my old school 5/6 has landed a few legit 15 lb. Skeena Steelhead, and about 4 dozen Russian river fish of all species, no chinook, but you know how that would go with a 5 wt. Even has a 24 pound Dog on its record...The hardest pound for pound fighter in the Salmon world...Purrty too when they streak out. Steelhead can be taken on stuff as light s 4wt, but go with a 5, or 5/6. You will really enjoy having 3 lb. brat stock Steel sink your rod a fair amount... The 8's, and 9's can grapple 50 lb. chinook easily, so go as light as you feel comfortable with. And when yo buy line, go one size larger than you are rated for. a 5 should get 6 wt. line, and so on. It will make casting a lot esaier in the beginning.
 
R

redhawk50

Member
Joined
Jun 24, 2008
Messages
137
Location
Canby
Another benefit of a higher weight rod is casting distance. You technically should be able to cover more water with 8 then a 6.
 
A

ArcticAmoeba

Active member
Joined
Jun 5, 2008
Messages
973
Location
Oregon
Oh yeah, an 8 wt. rigged up with nice 9 wt. line can shoota mile! You could cover the High water clack with somethin like that! But as a newer fly angler, take in to account your home river system...Will you only need a 6, or would a 9 wt. be better suited to getting out to a far seam. The ability to cover more water makes fishing that much more productive, so really give it some brain power, think about it.
 
F

Fisherman.Z.

Member
Joined
Jan 8, 2009
Messages
41
Location
Salem
You gentlemen and ladies are very helpful!

now, about leader, is it just like any other type of fishing?
use the leader thats rated the right weight for the fish.

like an 8 pound leader for steelies?

is that correct, or would you recommend other weights?
 
R

redhawk50

Member
Joined
Jun 24, 2008
Messages
137
Location
Canby
I mainly tie my own leaders, but yeah I would go with 8-12 like mentioned above and then throw some solid tippet on there. I know a lot of people swear by Maxima for tippet for steelhead which is not really tippet but I use it because I just add it onto my leader.
 
O

Oncorhynchus

Member
Joined
Jun 30, 2007
Messages
25
Location
Forest grove 0R
Really depends on the technique you use if its going to require heavier weight like swinging leach's for winters go with a 8 or 9wt if its indicator and egg pattern fishing a lot of people like a nice long 7wt for that. I bet you could catch some summers with a 6wt but you would be best off getting something bigger for winters.
 
B

bendflyguy

New member
Joined
Jan 6, 2009
Messages
8
Location
Bend, Oregon
I agree with the 8 wt. It will allow you to cast further. You can land a steely on a 5 wt (and I want to someday), but for a novice-intermediate fisherman I'd go with an 8.
 
F

Fisherman.Z.

Member
Joined
Jan 8, 2009
Messages
41
Location
Salem
this is why i love this forum! its so helpful... thanks everyone!
 
R

redhawk50

Member
Joined
Jun 24, 2008
Messages
137
Location
Canby
For sinking line here is the leader lengths for what I tie. It turns over real nice and I got it from a steelhead course I took. I use all Maxima leader material. 12" 25lb, 12" 15lb and then 18" 8lb. I then usually will tie 12-18" more of 8lb or 6lb as my "tippet" so when I change flies I use that up and then tie more on to the leader and it still turns over well. Use blood knots to tie it all together. Overall it is cheaper then store bought ones and you can make one on the spot if you keep the material in your pack or car.

Cheers!
 
C

Catch 22

Member
Joined
Jan 13, 2009
Messages
35
Location
The real O.C.
If you had to choose ONE flyrod, I would suggest a 6 wt with a decent reel. A good drag is important for steelies.

A 6 wt is in the middle and will perform OK for summer flows and smaller steelhead flies. It will be all you need for trout on any river.

However, for steelhead, when you decide to start throwing heavier flies and big ol sinktips, you will find yourself to be under-gunned.

BTW, Over lining it will only slow the action down. It will be easier to learn at first, but will absolutely suck as you start throwing heavier stuff on it. It will over load the rod and it will be sluggish. You will actually lose power.

Leader and tippet is decided more by the fly that you are turning than the fish you are after. You wouln't tie a small steelhead nymph onto a 12 lb leader. But a big ol articulating egg lucking leach you might.
 
B

Bucknasty

Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2009
Messages
77
Location
Veneta, Or
Just another couple of thoughts on this, You may want to look into the length of the rod as well. I just grabbed a new 8wt redington and spent way too little time thinking about rod length as i was more concerned with rod wt. Mine is nine foot and i usually fish remote coastal streams for steel so my thought was a shorter rod will be less cumbersom in the trees and brush.. I was wrong!!!! :rolleyes: I wish i would have grabbed at least a ten footer, Mending line at long distances is near impossible with my nine footer, and even keeping your visible line off the cross currents when fishing two or three runs outfrom the bank is very tough.(i have been on my freakn tippie toes trying to get line off the water) Get the extra foot in length it will only come in handy and its no tougher for hiking in brush with. Oh yeah I forgot to mention, I did compare the diff between a nine and ten footer as my dad was smart and bought an 8wt 10' echo.. a very nice rod with a similar fast action to my redington and not to expensive. Cheers, Bob
 
M

Mike123

Active member
Joined
Feb 8, 2009
Messages
1,574
Location
Oregon
Im new to fly fishing steelhead as well this has been helpful.

For swinging flies what would you guys recommend for fly line..
What brands and what type of lines work best for say medium to shallower runs?
 
R

redhawk50

Member
Joined
Jun 24, 2008
Messages
137
Location
Canby
The new multi-tip lines are really nice because you can adjust to the depth and rate of sink you want which is important. That is what I recommend because it can cover most situations. I have never fished with one so don't know how it casts or any brands.
 

Similar threads

D
Replies
4
Views
353
Diamond Lake Charlie
D
The Guides Forecast
Replies
0
Views
625
The Guides Forecast
The Guides Forecast
Top Bottom