Wading boots ?

J

JeepsAreBuilt

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So, I want to get a pair of wading boots.. I am thinking I'll get a felt sole type... so I was looking at them today at Dicks sporting goods.. they had a few of them. The cheaper ones were canvas type for $40. and then upwards to $80 for some exchangeable sole type. So.. then I saw they had chest waders with boots/felt for about the same price ! I already have neoprene chest waders. So just want some boots to go with them. I also am trying to figure out how you guys do it.. do you hike in the felt wading boots ? or carry them and put them on when needed. Also those felt wading boots.. is the felt replaceable ? how much does that cost ?

Thanks for any input
 
C

capblack

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i use wading shoes that are comfortable enough to hike in, its one less thing to carry. Brian
 
R

rippin fish lips

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I got neoprene chest waters to, I just go in my normal tennis shoe but they are only used for the (river).
Yes it is slick and you do slip! I myself would love to have some non slip wading boots! You can also buy the felt and glue them on to your shoe if its an all flat serfice to i think.
 
B

beaverfan

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I got neoprene chest waters to, I just go in my normal tennis shoe but they are only used for the (river).
Yes it is slick and you do slip! I myself would love to have some non slip wading boots! You can also buy the felt and glue them on to your shoe if its an all flat serfice to i think.

You sure can, I have a pair of tennis shoes I did that too earlier this summer. I just used Shoe Goo and some dollar stole felt insoles. I bought 2 packs and doubled them up because they were pretty thin. Worked very well and only cost about 5.00 including the Shoe Goo.
 
1

18406ej

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Bi-Mart sells a kit that includes a thick felt sole and glue for redoing waders, or for making wading boots out of something else. I have gone the neoprene route, but found that even in the winter they were a bit of an overkill for our relatively tepid waters. I am now going to go with the breathable waders with the interchangeable felt/studded boots.

Where is Dick's?
 
A

Anyfishisfine

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I bought really cheap canvas boots last year along with cheap neoprene chest waders.

The boots are falling apart, and the waders got a leak in the crotch. Closer inspection shows all the seams are separating.

So I went out and invested in a nice pair of breathable, and I don't think I'll ever look back.

The difference is huge if you hike around between holes like I do. Even in the winter the neoprene would make me sweat and I'd still end up soaked.
 
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meluvtrout

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Korkers are the ones with interchangeable soles probably, and that's what I'm using. You don't change back and forth though as it's too much work and you loose precious time on the water. They have studded felt soles for $11, get those with Korkers. I use long johns for fall underneath breathable waders. For winter add another layer of polar sweats and 2 pairs of wool socks. Summer time just shorts or pants(for bushes) I can roll up easily and hiking boots. Make sure your waders have a front pocket for easy access or you'll need to carry a vest / chest pack as well.
 
F

fishingfreak

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I went to Bi mart bought there Breathables for $69 and their remington Wading boots. The boots hurt your ankles if you are wading in large rock areas. You can replace the soles. The 1st pair I bought Neoprene waders with the boots attached I added felt soles. I went through 3 pairs due to Crotch leaks, the seams fell apart. Go with Breathables. I also added insoles, and ankle supports to the Remington Boots and now they work and feel great. Both Boots and waders from Bi mart with the insoles and supports cost me $119.99. I will never buy Neoprenes again. Good Luck.

FF
 
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steelhead1

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WARNING! do not buy the Korkers "cross current" wading boot! I paid 90$ for em and they started falling apart from day 1. The cheapies I had before them were from bi mart, and lasted two seasons:think:.I dont know anything about other models by Korkers,But I will never buy their boots again.
 
J

JeepsAreBuilt

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Thanks for all of your inputs. Too late, I already have neoprene waders.. hopefully they will last me a while. I like the idea of making my own wading boots.. I may try that to a old pair of hiking boots. Dicks sporting goods.. is what GIJOES use to be. At least thats what happened to the one in Salem(Located on Lancaster rd, near State st.).
 
E

everett464

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I have had two pair of cheapo wading boots (Remington, and Hodgman), and both of them lasted less than a year. My $60 Hodgman waders have lasted me two seasons without so much as a pinhole leak, but the boots just didn't cut it.

I then decided to make my own, because I was sure I could do better and/or save money. I made two different pair. The Felted Chuck Taylors were, visually, an acquired taste; I thought they looked awesome, but they fell apart even quicker than the store-bought versions and were a ***** to get on and off. The Felted Timberland hiking boots had slightly better durability, but they also eventually started falling apart (they just aren't made to be constantly submerged, yo) and were also a pain to get on and off.

I finally decided to throw down a couple of bucks and get a decent pair of boots! Last Spring (2009) I bought the Simms, Vibram-soled, Freestone, and, a year and a half later, could not be happier. The price tag is a little steep, at $125, but I NEVER regret the spent money; in fact, I would go so far as to say it was the best equipment investment I have ever made (maybe on par with my machined fly-reel). They are super durable, easy as pie to get on and off, and, with studs, keep me firmly planted at all times. you can hike in them, go directly into the water, and then back into the car without bringing half of the river with you. Add all of this to the fact that Simms has about the best customer-service in the world (they will exchange them if they break, period) the cost is negligible.

I urge you against making your own boots. No matter what folks will tell you, Shoe-Goo is going to be a maintenance project; it will come loose, and you will have to pull it all off, and start over again, probably every month or so if you are fishing heavily. The epoxy that comes with felting kits is somewhat longer-lasting (6 months?), but when you are looking at $15 - $20 for a kit at bi-mart, is there really a whole lot of value there after you add in the cost of a hiking boot?

In three years, I spent, at the very least, $150 on hodge-podge wading boots; it was often uncomfortable, and always frustrating. Compare that to the last year and a half, with boots that come off and go on without hassle, are uber-comfortable, and show absolutely no signs of noticeable distress, and suddenly the $125 doesn't sound so bad.

*edit: FTR, I have no stock in Simms, nor am I, by any means, an all Simms- sort of guy; my boots, and a couple of retractors (which are also awesome) are the only Simms products I own, mostly because I don't like to spend money, willy-nilly, on products I likely don't need. Korkers and Redington also have boots, in roughly the same price range, that I had on my possibilities list. The Freestones just wound up being the boot I decided to go with.
 
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M

Mike123

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I bought these and love them! Only $60 plus S&H... optional metal cleats...
They used to have just felt with little metal nubs.. those worked awesome, but mine were stolen off my front porch. Now you can only get the optional screw in cleats. Still have pretty good traction and really good comfort. If your hiking around a lot, don't get El Cheapo canvas boots. Your ankles will thank you.

http://cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templ...&parentType=index&indexId=cat20616&hasJS=true
 
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M

meluvtrout

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steelhead1;13 6115 said:
WARNING! do not buy the Korkers "cross current" wading boot! I paid 90$ for em and they started falling apart from day 1. The cheapies I had before them were from bi mart, and lasted two seasons:think:.I dont know anything about other models by Korkers,But I will never buy their boots again.

I have been using my Korkers Cross Current for the past 2 years and don't have a single complaint... And trust me, I gave them hell!
 
A

Anyfishisfine

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I finally decided to throw down a couple of bucks and get a decent pair of boots! Last Spring (2009) I bought the Simms, Vibram-soled, Freestone, and, a year and a half later, could not be happier. The price tag is a little steep, at $125, but I NEVER regret the spent money; in fact, I would go so far as to say it was the best equipment investment I have ever made (maybe on par with my machined fly-reel). They are super durable, easy as pie to get on and off, and, with studs, keep me firmly planted at all times. you can hike in them, go directly into the water, and then back into the car without bringing half of the river with you.

I got the same boots and I love them. I haven't gotten the studs yet, but it sounds like they help with the traction, which is my only complaint, and it's not much of one. I've only had issues on slimy moss. Everything else is fine.
 
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everett464

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sounds like they help with the traction

Its night and day. I hated them with no studs; I think they have better traction than felt, with the studs on.
 
A

Anyfishisfine

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I hate to hijack the thread, but I got the studs at lunch today. The girl at the store said I didn't need a pack for each boot, which is a good considering they are freaking expensive. They come in a pack of 24, so 12 for each boot. Since there are a lot more holes than studs, any suggestions on a placement pattern?
 
E

everett464

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a) I put four on the heel in a relatively wide square,
b) a long pentagon under the toe section with its point high and the base down to just above where the boot starts moving up into the arch,
c) and then I popped one in the middle of the pentagon I suppose you have enough to put one in the middle of the square too.
 
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