The reel question spinning vs baitcasting

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wanna go fishing

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If this question has been answered before let me know. I tried to do a search and did not find anything but I bet there is something here somwhere :think:

I'm returning to fishing after far to many years and I have a reliable spinning setup and only know how to use that type of reel. But I'm considering adding a bait casting reel combo to my "toolchest". I'm thinking there are some advantages to a casting reel but don't know if my thoughts about it are correct and I'm a little intimidated by the learning curve, I've heard they take some getting used to.

Could I have some advice pros, cons when, where and how to use and recommendations for a starter combo?

Thanks
Janice
 
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ArcticAmoeba

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To be real honest... It is goig to be application specific, and determined by the angler as to which type would fill the bill... But I use a spinning set-up for drift fishing smaller streams, and creeks. Primarily because I can laser cast two small split shot, 60 feet with one. I use a casting unit on bigger rivers, like the Clackamas, Sandy or Santiam, where I don't have to worry much about snipe casting between bushes. With the casting reel, you will probably need to use a hair more weight than you do with the spinning reel to start off. And having your drag, brake, and magnetic brake set properly is impereitive for accurate, mess-free casting. I like to have a casting set-up for the largeer rivers too, because they generally have a bit more drag force. Meaning you can drop your rod tip to the side, and really give those steelhead a good pull out of the current. But having a casting rig in your arsenal ca nbe very beneficial for a lot of anglers, but don't go overboard too quick with one. Get something that suits your budget, and get used to casting it around the yard, or wherever you please. But practice makes perfect with everything. Good luck finding something for your needs.
 
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Drice

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I am the opposite I have pinpoint accuracy with the bait caster but I can't cast too far with lighter weight. I can Fling the spinning reel for days with (like you said) 2 split shots but good luck getting me in the general area with it. Also like what was said it is kind of application and angler specific I know people who will not go near a bait caster but I personally love them. The key is practice. I used to cast into a 5 gallon bucket from across the yard just so I could fish without getting backlash. For ease of use the spinner is easy but for certain apps the caster is preferable.
 
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wanna go fishing

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Here's how I will be doing most of my fishing.

Here's how I will be doing most of my fishing.

Probably not steelhead for a bit, since I don't have a clue right now. Eventually I'll get brave.

I will most likely be trout fishing in local lakes and streams and sometimes when I hike.

I'd like to do some bass fishing especially since my brother does that in AZ and I'd like join him when I visit. He always loans me his spinning reels and not his baitcasters because I'm familiar with the spin casting. And I know of some places near my home where smallmouths hang out and think it would be fun.

I'm not somebody who likes to just drop a line and let it sit. I need to be actively casting or I get bored. And my accuracy with a spinning reel is . . . well. . . NOT accurate. But I'm sure with practice it will get better. The fishing I did as a kid was generally in a boat trolling on the Willamette or lake fishing over a hole.
 
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1aB

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Spinning reels allow easy line switch options by swapping spools, like my 1500 reels can handle 4# & 6# mono + 10# -14# microfiber to cover most inland apps. But, after almost 50 years of practice, my casting accuracy with a spinner is still pathetic. I would consider a baitcaster if precision (heavier) lure placement, longer casting distance, or stronger & more line were needful to a situation.
 
W

wanna go fishing

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If I wait another fifty years.

If I wait another fifty years.

Okay so it seems that spinning reels are not as accurate but can cast lighter lures but bait casters are more accurate. It definitely sounds like there is a niche for the bait casters especially for bass but it sounds like the spinning reel is the go to reel if I had only one choice.

Now if it takes me another fifty years to accurately cast, I guess it won't matter because I probably won't be able to see where I'm casting anyway.:lol: I can't even tie a knot without my readers :(

Thanks for the advice.
 
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ArcticAmoeba

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Its no fun anyways to harass Bass or stockers on a casting reel anyways!:lol: But they really do shine in certain places, but not generally for trout fishing, and the like.

And geez, you guys and no accuracy with spinning gear!:lol::rolleyes: Just jokin, but it does take a completely different approach, and load up, to get it where you want it. But for sniping in small streams, they can't be beat. I too practiced in a 5 gallon bucket back in the day with 6500 Abus, and such! Funny, but it really helps with judging how much to load up, and where to release if you practice casting from all angles.
 
Troutski

Troutski

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Targeting....

Targeting....

I am a bit confused here, what does a spinning reel have to do with casting accurately? Wouldn't the accuracy be dictated by the rod? Maybe I am missing something....

Chuck
 
T

The Nothing

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I"m a diehard spinner fan, bought my first caster a few weeks ago (abu 5500) which broke after 2 days of use. I'm STILL waiting on the replacement.

I still haven't figured out the big advantage of casting reels. Spinning reels come with more than one spool, so pretty much everything I have has a spool of braid, and spool of lighter mono. Using the same rod and reel I can go from 25# mono for steelhead plunking, and switch immediately to 65# braid and go after sturgeon.

I'm honestly not sure where these accuracy statements are coming from... I've not had an accuracy issue other than over-shooting...
 
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Combat Chuck

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I probably have about the same accuracy with both. Its the distance control that I like about a casting reel.
 
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wanna go fishing

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Thanks for the info.

Thanks for the info.

Seems there are two camps on this issue but the info has helped me a lot. I'll get really skilled with my spinning combo and maybe later enjoy the back up of a caster.
 
D

Drice

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I am a bit confused here, what does a spinning reel have to do with casting accurately? Wouldn't the accuracy be dictated by the rod? Maybe I am missing something....

Chuck

I think that maybe for my spinning reels I use a little lighter action rod than with my bait casters I dunno if is this or just different release or that I just never practiced accuracy with a spinner, What ever it is rod, reel, line, or what, something takes away from me personally being able to thread the needle in cover or aiming for a small stick in the water just never had much luck. Not that I dont really enjoy spinning tackle cause its easy worry free fishing with the ability of changing spools for different applications. I have a few of both. All my trout rigs are spinners but my bass goto is a bait caster.
 
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plunkme

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i found this description online at takemefishing and it seems to make a lot of sense to me

Bait-Casting Reel

A bait-casting reel is designed to cast larger lures or bait for a longer distance. They typically include a level-wind mechanism to prevent the line from being trapped under itself during rewind and subsequent casts.

Many bait-casting reels are also fitted with anti-reverse handles and drags designed to slow runs by large and powerful game fish.
Standard bait-casting reels are mounted above the rod and have a retrieving crank on the right side of the reel. But they're also made for lefties.

Because the momentum of the forward cast must rotate the spool as well as propel the lure, you should always use heavier lures with a bait-casting reel.




Open-Bail Spin Reel

With a spin-casting reel, a mechanical pickup is used to retrieve the line and an anti-reverse lever prevents the crank handle from rotating while a fish is pulling line from the spool. And because the line doesn't have to pull against a rotating spool, like it does with a bait-casting reel, you can use much lighter lures with a spin-casting reel.

Fixed-spool reels are cast by opening the bail, grasping the line with the forefinger and then using a backward snap of the rod followed by a forward cast, releasing the line with the forefinger at the same time. On the retrieve, the large rotating wire cage or bail (either manually or trigger-operated) serves as the line pickup, restoring the line to its original position on the spool.

Open-Bail reels are traditionally mounted below the rod. And they're really pretty simple to use.
 
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fourgotten

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I am a bit confused here, what does a spinning reel have to do with casting accurately? Wouldn't the accuracy be dictated by the rod? Maybe I am missing something....

Chuck

The rod and reel combined make for good accuracy, however a casting reel or conventional reel can be more accurate in that you can more easily and accurately slow the line as it leaves the spool.

With a spinning reel, you can slow the line leaving the spool with a forefinger against the rim of the spool, but it's not terribly accurate... with a casting reel, you just thumb the spool to slow its rotation.

Is it worth the frustration of backlashing if you don't pay close attention to your casting? Maybe... certainly it is for some fishing... You can make some KILLER casts into the surf with one... but... with proper technique you can make almost as long of casts with a spinning reel, so... :think:
 
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