Spinner fishing


#1
New to spinning for trout. I always fly fished high streams in utah. Want to start spin fishing also. Just wondering on what size swivels and clips you all like best. Also think I have hook size down use 6 or 8. And been using 10 and 12 treble hooks. Also heard of using corky at eye of hook.heard this helps float worms or power bait. Any suggestions thank you much.
 
#2
I always used the smallest barrel snap swivel I could find I don't have an actual size for example though. I used to think the gold ones worked better than black because they're shinny but it does not matter. I also couldn't tell you best hook size but in my experienced opinion the hands down best spinner, for trout, is a 1/4 or 1/6 Black & Yellow Panther Martin with Gold blade. Rooster Tails work great too! But.... Panther Martins spin wayyyy better. I've caught native and stocked Rainbows, wild Cutthroat, wild Brook, and Redband all on the Black & Yellow
 

Slo

New member
#3
Depending on where you are fishing, I've used Rooster tails down to 1/16" oz, all the way up to 1/4 oz. Same with Panther Martins and Mepps. As for swivels, I agree, go with the smaller sizes. You want the flash and action at the spinner, but you also want it to keep spinning without ending up with a lot of line twist, too. I've had trout, bass, pan fish, even in salt water, go after the swivel if it's too flashy. Colors and finishes - too many variables. Bright days, I tend to stick with brass and darker colors. Overcast days, I go with something with more flash or color. But there are times when it pays to watch what the fish are going after, too. Over in central Oregon, sometimes matching spinner body color with whatever bugs are landing on the water can produce big results. Stocker lakes - it's pretty much whatever they aren't getting bombarded with - or more of the same. Keep your tackle pretty siimple and light, too. Too heavy of line takes a lot out of the action of your offering and limits your casting distance. Any time now most of the stores will be running their trout specials, so stock up on spinners, dough baits, Pautzke eggs, etc. Mad River also puts out some styrofoam beeds that you can use to help float your baits, too. Hope this helps.

Slo
 
#5
wils;n611683 said:
treble hooks don't lend themselves well to successful releases...even with the barbs pinched off
Lose the trebles if you want to release anything. Go with a Siwash hook that's a bit bigger than an individual part of your treble. You will catch as many fish with a single point Siwash hook.
 

troutdude

Well-known member
Moderator
#6
IMO the very best thing that you can do; is get yourself a copy of Jed Davis's book "Spinner Fishing for Steelhead, Salmon, and Trout". Jed is a fellow Oregonian, and his book has been the spin fisherman's Bible for decades. It is chock full of VALUABLE details.
 

troutdude

Well-known member
Moderator
#8
Perhaps you're correct Doc. I made an assumption that Jed's book was written specifically about fishing the Mac, and the South Santiam. And I vaguely recall something, about Eugene. So I figured that, he lived in Oregon (at least in the 80's). But I could be mistaken.
 
#9
I like the design of the Rooster Tail spinners, but not the spinner blade performance. Using Bang Tails instead pretty much fixes the problem. Cuttroats seem to like the Bolo spinner a lot.
 
#12
Just to add a different viewpoint, go big with spinners to avoid the small fish. I mostly use #5 spinners. Fish under 8" are much less likely to be hooked. Blue Fox are reliable mass produced spinners. Rvrfishr is a small production company that sells high quality assemble-your-own spinners.

I downsize one size for rainbow compared to cutthroat/brown/brook of the same size and downsize again if trout are shy about striking.

Treble vs. single? Preference is single for ease of release, but with the large trebles on a #5 #4 #3, it's not worth changing out the hook if the spinner didn't start as a single hook (Rvrfishr). At #2 & smaller, definitely single hook.

Also consider the little wobblers from, I think, Luhr Jensen in faster shallow mountain streams.
 

hobster

Well-known member
#13
Wow, #5 spinners are pretty huge. I only use them for salmon, or steelhead if the water is OFF color. Winter steelhead - #3 or #4 blue fox, summer steelhead - # 2 or #3

For trout my go to is Thomas Buoyant 1/6 spoon. They hammer it! I use spinners a lot also and like blue fox # 0 or # 1 for trout, water in the summer can be gin clear. Panther Martin's are my second favorite. Lots of good advice above, Jed Davis' book is essential.
 

troutdude

Well-known member
Moderator
#14
hobster;n612523 said:
Wow, #5 spinners are pretty huge. I only use them for salmon, or steelhead if the water is OFF color. Winter steelhead - #3 or #4 blue fox, summer steelhead - # 2 or #3

For trout my go to is Thomas Buoyant 1/6 spoon. They hammer it! I use spinners a lot also and like blue fox # 0 or # 1 for trout, water in the summer can be gin clear. Panther Martin's are my second favorite. Lots of good advice above, Jed Davis' book is essential.
Ditto. #5, or even #4, spinners are way too big for summer fishing. Unless you're fishing really big water, like the Columbia. I got a 1st edition, of Jed's book, when it first hit the market in the mid-80's. Getting your own copy--and reading it, from cover to cover--will tell you all you need to know.
 

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