Really could use some advice

T
tangled lines
I have recently relocated to Gresham Oregon to take care of my father who is have difficult times with cancer. As I am sure many of you have witnessed or heard about, the treatment is often worse than the cancer itself and often leads to depression. I would like to try to pull him out of his depression with offering him an opportunity to start fishing again. Coupe years back he had a garage fire and lost his fishing gear amongst other things and hasn't fished since. The happiest, calmest, and strongest I have ever seen my dad is when he is fishing and I want to restore that vital aspect of his life. I have $2000 that I can spend so I am thinking $1400 on rods and reels ($200 per rig, total 7) and $600 on tackle and gear, just to get the ball rolling. I have been doing extensive research of rod and reel manufactures as far as warranties, quality, durability and of course cost, so I don't really need input on brand suggestions, however, feel free to help as you see fit. I am mainly interested in rod spec: length, action, power, mono capacity for specified species and scenario, along with type of reel (bait caster or spinning). I would like to thank you in advance for your time, consideration and knowledge. The scenarios are as follows:

  • Steelhead/Salmon, from bank, drift fishing and spinner fishing, very little obstructions for casting (think I might need multiple rigs, can afford up to 4)
  • Trout, from shore, toss a worm and drink coffee, no obstructions for casting (1 rig)
  • Trout, from shore, spinners, no obstructions for casting (1 rig)
  • Small mouth, from bank, spinners, no obstructions for casting (1 rig)
 
T
Throbbit _Shane
tangled lines said:
I have recently relocated to Gresham Oregon to take care of my father who is have difficult times with cancer. As I am sure many of you have witnessed or heard about, the treatment is often worse than the cancer itself and often leads to depression. I would like to try to pull him out of his depression with offering him an opportunity to start fishing again. Coupe years back he had a garage fire and lost his fishing gear amongst other things and hasn't fished since. The happiest, calmest, and strongest I have ever seen my dad is when he is fishing and I want to restore that vital aspect of his life. I have $2000 that I can spend so I am thinking $1400 on rods and reels ($200 per rig, total 7) and $600 on tackle and gear, just to get the ball rolling. I have been doing extensive research of rod and reel manufactures as far as warranties, quality, durability and of course cost, so I don't really need input on brand suggestions, however, feel free to help as you see fit. I am mainly interested in rod spec: length, action, power, mono capacity for specified species and scenario, along with type of reel (bait caster or spinning). I would like to thank you in advance for your time, consideration and knowledge. The scenarios are as follows:

  • Steelhead/Salmon, from bank, drift fishing and spinner fishing, very little obstructions for casting (think I might need multiple rigs, can afford up to 4)
  • Trout, from shore, toss a worm and drink coffee, no obstructions for casting (1 rig)
  • Trout, from shore, spinners, no obstructions for casting (1 rig)
  • Small mouth, from bank, spinners, no obstructions for casting (1 rig)

I use a 2500 series Shimano Spinning reel for many applications. From Smallies in the summer, Trout in the fall and winter, Large mouth Bass in the spring, summer, fall, and Steelhead all year. As for rods you can get away using the same rod for trout as you would for bass in certain scenarios. A 6'6 -7ft spinning rod rated for 4-8 or 6-10. And I run 8lb mono when ever I can. I have Ultra light trout rods for when I need to go lower and want to feel the tiny trout, ha.

And welcome to Oregon. Good luck to your dad.
 
T
Tinker
You could think about combining the rig for tossing spinners at steelhead with the smallmouth rig. The steelhead rod should be a bit longer than you might need for the bass, but the line weights and reels should be nearly identical. I don't fish for bass anymore (wrong part of the state) but I would use a 7-1/2 foot medium rod with a fast action and 20 or 30lb braided main line to a light monofilament leader for tossing spinners. I'd use an 8 to 9 foot rod with the same weight and fast action, and the same main line - but a different leader - for steelhead (not that I've caught any, mind you). I wouldn't hesitate to use the longer rod for smallmouth and just change leaders.

I don't fish bait for steelhead or bass - too many bad experiences with bait being swallowed so deeply that the fish dies - and so, I use spinning reels in the 3000 and 4000 size. I prefer the smaller 3000 series reels - they are 2500-sized reels with larger spool capacities.

I use 7-foot light and a 7-1/2 foot light spinning rods for trout. Both have fast actions. I change them depending on how far I need to cast, but The Boss always uses the 7-foot for fishing worms and a bobber. I spool an 8 lb braided mainline to a 4 or 6 lb fluorocarbon leader. In my opinion, it's hard to beat the Okuma SST Kokanee rods I use. The 7-1/2 foot is about halfway between light and ultra-light and is truly a joy to use - and you can pick them up at a fair price.

Some may say that this is a bit overweight for trout, but I don't listen to contrary opinions, so let them talk. On the Elk and Sixes, I am in fast-flowing water and I need to turn a trout that heads downstream on me, so I use light tackle and not ultralight.

I'll leave salmon to those who know more about fish in your area. Down here, I'm happy with an 8-1/2 foot extra-heavy extra-fast rod, and 40 lb braid to a 20 or 25 lb leader for spoons and spinners. I use a 4000 series spinning reel and a 5600-sized levelwind reel. I use the spinning reel 95% of the time and simply admire the Ambassadeur...

Reading about gear is not the same as experience with the gear. My trout rigs are in the $150 range, each - rod, reel and main line. My steelhead rig is about $250, rod, reel and main line. The spinning rig for salmon is about $300, rod, reel and main line. The levelwind is a bank-busting $400 (it wasn't when I bought it, but it would cost at least that much to replace it in today's market).

For a short while, long ago, I fished the pro bass tour. Top name and high cost do not equal the best gear for the job at hand. Listen to the folks here who use and abuse gear and they'll steer you true.

Good luck. My thoughts are for your Dad. Let us know when you start fishing and post some pictures! Nothing beats father and son fishing photos.
 
D
DirectDrive
Sorry to hear of your dad's illness.
I wish him a fast recovery.

My advice is to forgo all of this "equipment mania" and ease into it with a guided trip somewhere.
Concentrate on spending quality time with your father instead of worrying about which rod, which reel, what line etc, etc.

Guided trip.
That should be your first step.
 
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D
DrTheopolis
What DD said.

I could easily spend 2 GRRRR on rods and reels, but I wouldn't.

In the next 2-3 months, steelheading on the Sandy and Clack should be booming. Dress warm, then put on another layer, and you two will have a blast.
 
B
BlueWater
Stay optimistic and by all means, stay positive: buy the gear and use it with your Dad for years and years.
 
E
eugene1
I also think getting into a guided trip is the best way to treat your old man to the best experience. DD is spot on, good times spent together will mean a lot, but the frustration of breaking in new gear/techniques could be a struggle.

Getting into (or back into) the sport can be kinda slow and painful. Not sure what your dad's clinical outlook is, but I'd get him and yourself into a few guided trips asap. Maybe then think about putting down the $ for gear and going on your own.

Best luck,
 
K
Knot Fishing Sober
Sorry about your dad. I'm sure you will get plenty of positive thoughts and prayers from the good people on this site. Hopefully you guys have a great fishing season!
 
hobster
hobster
I know what you are going through. My father was diagnosed with brain cancer about a year ago and its come back strong. He has a few months to live and hes' going through the same thing, radiation is leading to depression. Like you, I just want his little time left to be enjoyable but it seems hard for him to enjoy it. Planning your death must be a weird thing.
I think its awesome what you are doing! A guided trip is a great idea, and don't worry about all the expensive gear. I caught plenty of steel on a crappy rod and reel, i'd go with Okuma or another mid grade setup and maybe just a bobber and drift rod for you guys. Spending time on the river with him is the important part! Enjoy every second with him, life is short. Good luck!
 
jamisonace
jamisonace
I agree you should enjoy a guided trip with your dad. But I also think an investment in gear is a good idea for the two of your to spend time together without a guide.

I recently bought all new gear (insurance claim) and I went with some buzz ramsey berkleys and ambassadeur 6501's for salmon and 5501's for steelhead. For spinning gear I bought Okuma rods and reels for under $50.

It's not top of the line but I sure like what I have.

I didn't spend more than $150 on any one set up and the spinning sets cost around $100.
 
T
tangled lines
WOW! thank you so much for the kind words and advice. Its nice to know I am amongst a community that has heart and compassion. I think I am going to take all of the advice, guided trip and buy the gear. I got enough information to make to an educated purchase and I can't thank you all enough. I want to do the guided trip as soon as he's a little bit stronger, that was a great idea. How would I go about finding a guide? Is it like hiring a contractor, do I ask for a portfolio or something? If I am going to do a guide, I would like the best guide I can find. Any recommendations?
 
H
halibuthitman
Ed Fast.. Ed is a fish samurai, and he can teach you more in one day than you will learn on your own in dozens of trips- i hope your dad feels better soon-
 
D
DrTheopolis
I don't know him, but any time the terms "Sandy" and "guide" are used, the name Ed Fast always comes up with glowing reviews. With such an amazing reputation, I'm sure you can't go wrong.

If you're ever considering a guided Clack trip, I can give you quite a list of good ones.
 
B
bigboy70
Ed Fast x3!
 

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