Rainbow triploids

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yakker2

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where to fish for rainbow triploids in oregon?
 
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Kodiak

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Most stocked trout in oregon are triploids. It is a basic misunderstanding, they are not a spiecies but rather trout, steelhead, and salmon, that are genetically altered fish. Because they are sterile they do not reproduce but rather, the energy which would have been focused in these fish toward reproduction, goes directly into body growth.
 
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Thuggin4Life

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I'm not so sure about that since many pellets head i catch have eggs in them and ahve got a few in full spawn color. But I live in a different region.
 
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steelhead_stalkers

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I only know of a few places that stock triploids in California. I don't think they stock many in Oregon. Its a more expensive process and there would be huge trout being caught everywhere. I wish they would stock diamond lake with them. You would be fishing the next state record in three years! I used to fish down in California for them and caught some monsters.
 
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Mike123

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There are a few lakes in Washington that have hugeeee Triploids. My friend went there last year and got some. Do a google search on it.
Washington is gonna be your closest bet. Klamath Lake has some monster bows in it too.
 
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yakker2

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yea, I had already researched it.thought maybe somebody might know something more about oregon.I thought on hog quest they fished for them on the columbia-maybe those were hybrids.
 
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schroegp

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Spanaway lake just south of tacoma was stocking triploids for a while. I caught a 7 pounder and an 8 pounder fishing powerbait off the bottom when I lived up there 9 years ago. Incredible trout!
 
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Thuggin4Life

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I just read where I am taking my boat this june to fish with my dad in Idaho they stock tripliod kamloops. After some quick research. A kamloop iisn't its own branch of the tree anymore and is only a kamloop if environmental factors are right at birth so I am confused how they can call them kamloops because yu would imagine they would revert back and loss the kamloop features once stocked in the warmer water. But anyways I don't know much about the kamloop but did see some nice sized triploids being caught so hopefully they are still there. I think that they should stock regular fish instead of trriploids. Sure triploids get bigger faster but they don't reproduce so real fish are always better since they have the chance to reproduce and slow down on the feeding every year which is good for the ecosystem.
 
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yakker2

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I just remembered that odfw said that the trout being stocked in the s. yamhill are unable to reproduce. so I went back and read the newsletter - they are triploids. so just how big would a carry over be this year?
 
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Kodiak

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You can't expect triploids to get huge over a year, over even three. It all depends on the amount of available feed, water temps, and of course fish harvest. I would assume in that type of river setting a 10" stocker last year will be anywhere from 12" to 16" and maybe 20" this time next year, its in the next couple of years after that you might see 6 and 7 lb fish comming out of the river.
 
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fourgotten

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I think that they should stock regular fish instead of trriploids. Sure triploids get bigger faster but they don't reproduce so real fish are always better since they have the chance to reproduce and slow down on the feeding every year which is good for the ecosystem.

OTOH, diploid fish (non-triploid) have the ability to reproduce and, thus, contaminate native strains of fish. Personally, I think that stocking in places where there are native trout, especially cutthroat , should be triploid only, to prevent destruction of the native fish. (Cutthroat trout are especially harmed by hatchery fish introduction because they can interbreed with rainbow trout, leaving the rainbow trout as the dominant genome).

I don't think that the constant food intake is much of a problem... the foods are available all year, so it shouldn't hurt if the fish are as well.
 
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Kodiak

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Yeah but Cut/bows are tasty...and stupid!;)
 

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