Poly yarn indicator.

J

Jish@61

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I just got back from trout fishing in a small lake, I was flyfishing, I put on one of those poly yarn indicators. Is there some trick to get a decent cast, i was getting pretty good cast without it but when I attached one of those poly yarn strike indicators on I couldn't get a decent cast no matter how hard I tried, anyone have any suggestions?
 
TheKnigit

TheKnigit

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I have not messed around with poly yarn indicators all that much, but what kind of line were to throwing it on? I could see having issues if it was a 5wt, or smaller, floating line. Maybe it would fly a little better with a weight forward line or a small shooting head added in? You could also try running a dry dropper set up as your strike indicator, as long as the regs say that is is legal. Depending on the size of fly, you could also try trimming the indicator so that it has a smaller wind profile.
 
J

Jish@61

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It was a 5wt. I thinks it was a tapered line I guess a regular fly line, I'm new at this so I will try the weight forward line, never seen a shooting head. Thanks.
 
TheKnigit

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I might try trimming the indicator, or switching to a different style indicator, before swapping lines. It will be a little bit cheaper than purchasing a new line.
 
DOKF

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I sometimes use a yarn indicator when I cannot see the actual fly or the end of the flyline (where the tapered leader attaches), When I do use the yarn, I use a very bright colour so that I can use it very sparingly.

Minimal is the rule to avoid interfering with the cast or drift.
 
J

Jish@61

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That sounds more viable then thise other indicators. I try my best with those others and I can never get more then like 15 ft. Thsnjs.
 
J

Jish@61

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DOKF, Hello, I am just wondering how much yarn fo I cut off? I plan to use a beaded nymphs and weighted flies.
 
DOKF

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I cut a section about 1.25 ~ 1.5" long of pink, yellow or orange yarn. Then peel OFF a few threads (just enough to make it visible on the water), and then tie it on to your flyline just above the leader knot. I also put some dryfly dressing (silicone grease) on it after it is tied to my line; this helps keep it high on the water.

You may find some trout atracted to the yarn indicator depending on which colour you use, so try not to use a colour that would normally be used as "bait". I sometimes mix pink and yellow, but still get some hits.
 
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Jish@61

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That's what I was thinking, the trout might eat the yarn,lol, thanks
 
DOKF

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It is usually the small fry that hit on the yarn, but it may be pause for thought if larger trout (or salmonids) are hitting the yarm. In that case, one might consider a change of strategy.
 
TheKnigit

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If larger fish are hitting the indicator then I might consider switching to a dropper style rig, and using a dry fly in a similar color/size as my indicator.
 
DOKF

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If castng a yarn indicator is difficult, the dry fly dropper rig may also be challenging. I find it so for several reasons, but mostly because of increased tangles with a larger fly in the middle of the leader ...
 
DOKF

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You will have to experiment with weights, techniques, drift length. Increased challenges, but that is part of the experience.
 
J

Jish@61

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I guess it all comes with experience, trial and error kinda thing, haveca good one.
 
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gfisher2003

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This might not be the problem that you are facing, but I have found that with larger and more flies, or indicators on your line you need to be more careful about letting your backcast and forecast fully unfurl before switching directions. It can be helpful to have a longer pause on your backcast and forecast to fix that. Any small errors that you have in your casting form will be amplified the more weight and separate things you have on your tippet.

It could be helpful to know what your cast is doing that you don't like, like is it piling up when it lands a bunch, or is it tangling while in the air or something like that.
 
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Jish@61

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Yep I've practice a lot on this smaller lake, its wen the breeze picks up that cause my cast not to unfurl all the way.
 
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olshiftybiscuits

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Slow down your back cast a bit, the yarn adds wind resistance. Treat it like you’re casting a big chubby with a long tungsten dropper. Yarn indicators should be easier to cast than any of the other options out there.
 
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olshiftybiscuits

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Yep I've practice a lot on this smaller lake, its wen the breeze picks up that cause my cast not to unfurl all the way.
On a lake try positioning yourself with your back to the wind and cast with the wind. Short back cast, then let line shoot out of your left hand like you’re casting a spey rig on the forward stroke. The wind will take it and you’ll cast that sucker 50 feet no problem.
 
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