Kayak fishing around Lincoln City??

nikita_pdx

Member
Anyone out here know where I can hit water on a kayak round Lincoln City? I’m going on two weekend trips in the following March and April and I have a sturdy kayak I was thinking about taking out to devils lake. I hear they have good trout that’s stocked, but I would primarily target warmwater species-cuz it’s my knack.

OR, I can go to the tidal flats of Siletz Bay, and attempt to catch flounder?? I’ve done this in the Yaquina Bay in the past, and according to the ‘Anglers Guide to the United States Pacific Coast’, the time I intend to go is perfect for flounder and possibly surfperch.

let me know if u got some good water that hits round Lincoln. Not a salmon expert either so don’t tell me to troll plug herring in the Siletz Bay.

thanks
 

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troutdude

Moderator
Olalla Reservoir north of Toledo is a very nice place. It is also stocked with trout. But also contains bass that came down from the old lake at Valsetz. In fact I would go there, than Devil's Lake, anytime. Olalla is quiet and has decent scenery.
 

C_Run

Well-known member
Olalla Reservoir north of Toledo is a very nice place. It is also stocked with trout. But also contains bass that came down from the old lake at Valsetz. In fact I would go there, than Devil's Lake, anytime. Olalla is quiet and has decent scenery.

Yep, I agree. Olalla also has yellow perch and some bluegill. It's usually pretty quiet and out of the wind.
 

Snopro

Member
If the wind allows, its hard to go back to warm water species after you get a taste of salt. Lincoln City is right between two of the best spots on the coast, Depoe Bay and Pacific City.

Bring a buddy and dress for the water temp.
 

pinstriper

Well-known member
It depends, I guess, on your definition of "around". The areas mentioned strike me as more "around Newport" than "around Lincoln City".

In March, the Salmon River just north of Lincoln City is still open for steelhead. I don't know if the run will be on that late, I haven't fished it. And of course it is too early for trout even in April.

If your definition allows you to range as far as Sand Lake, there is a lot of recreational kayaking there, but I hear flounder are to be had as well. You might want to keep a close eye on the tides, I went nosing around and the current was ripping on the inbound and I expect the outbound as well.
 

nikita_pdx

Member
It depends, I guess, on your definition of "around". The areas mentioned strike me as more "around Newport" than "around Lincoln City".

In March, the Salmon River just north of Lincoln City is still open for steelhead. I don't know if the run will be on that late, I haven't fished it. And of course it is too early for trout even in April.

If your definition allows you to range as far as Sand Lake, there is a lot of recreational kayaking there, but I hear flounder are to be had as well. You might want to keep a close eye on the tides, I went nosing around and the current was ripping on the inbound and I expect the outbound as well.
I meant maybe a 20 mile radius. And yees, defidently keep an eye on the tide. I was Multispecies fishing Yaquina Bay when high tide kicked in and dragged me off anchor. Thankfully I caught a jetty.
 

pinstriper

Well-known member
I meant maybe a 20 mile radius. And yees, defidently keep an eye on the tide. I was Multispecies fishing Yaquina Bay when high tide kicked in and dragged me off anchor. Thankfully I caught a jetty.

If your anchor had held, it would likely have sunk you. Anchoring a kayak is very risky in tidewater, or any strong current.

By “keeping an eye on the tides” I really meant “plan your fishing so you fish the slack and are off the water before the current starts ripping”. That could include putting in towards the end of the inbound tide, riding it up the bay to where you want to fish, and ride the tide back to your takeout when the tide turns, but you gotta be sure it wont sweep you past. Or,put in at the end of the outbound, fish the slack, and get off the water before you are swept up the bay. You can't fight a strong tide in a kayak.
 

nikita_pdx

Member
If your anchor had held, it would likely have sunk you. Anchoring a kayak is very risky in tidewater, or any strong current.

By “keeping an eye on the tides” I really meant “plan your fishing so you fish the slack and are off the water before the current starts ripping”. That could include putting in towards the end of the inbound tide, riding it up the bay to where you want to fish, and ride the tide back to your takeout when the tide turns, but you gotta be sure it wont sweep you past. Or,put in at the end of the outbound, fish the slack, and get off the water before you are swept up the bay. You can't fight a strong tide in a kayak.
The anchor wasn’t meant to hold me in place for current but rather wind. It was annoying to reposition over a good area I found constantly so I dropped a five pounder and released a bit of rope for slack. It did it’s job and I was used to staying in that spot that it took me some time to realize I was drifting away a little. Ended up catching shore on a jetty rather than the beach. I was also 20ish min late to when I had to leave before high tide kicked in
 

troutdude

Moderator
Big Creek Reservoir #2 (above Big Creek Reservoir #1), is on the north end of Newport. Also a nice place to trout fish. But there are no bass; only trout and perch.
 

troutdude

Moderator
Stocked. And I'm not positive; but it may have a few native cutties. However I've never caught any cutties there. So don't hold me to that.
 

Bob Smith

New member
Devils Lake's warmwater species took a hit after grass carp were planted between 1986 and 1993 to control the aquatic vegetation. Now the grass carp have died out - the vegetation has started to return as well as the largemouth bass and other warmwater species. I wouldn't expect it to be red hot but there are some bass to be had.
 

Cooper

New member
If your anchor had held, it would likely have sunk you. Anchoring a kayak is very risky in tidewater, or any strong current.

By “keeping an eye on the tides” I really meant “plan your fishing so you fish the slack and are off the water before the current starts ripping”. That could include putting in towards the end of the inbound tide, riding it up the bay to where you want to fish, and ride the tide back to your takeout when the tide turns, but you gotta be sure it wont sweep you past. Or,put in at the end of the outbound, fish the slack, and get off the water before you are swept up the bay. You can't fight a strong tide in a kayak.
This is of prime importance. If you run into trouble, cut the anchor, you live is worth more.
 
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