I would like to start trout fishing in rivers and streams

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sirsnagalot

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So I want to start fishing for trout in rivers and streams but have never tried it before, what kind of tackle and fishing methods would you guys recommend? Where would be a great spot to go to do this as well I live in Hillsboro but I'm willing to drive out to spots that are easy access within an hour and a half.

I am familiar with drifting for steelhead/salmon so if you could point out the differences for me that would be awesome. Also I am not a fly-fisherman and dont know how-to or have access any fly gear so I will be using a baitcaster reel with a 7ft medium action rod 1/4 - 3/4oz on probably 8lb line. I have other set ups to but primarily this will be the set up I would like to use if I can.
 
brandon4455

brandon4455

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if you use that setup you won't feel the trout at all they will feel like little sticks on your hook.. and a baitcaster wont do for the kind of stuff you will throw for trout like spinners. your going to need a spinning reel with a 5-7ft light-ultralight rod with 4lb test rigged up. a couple colors of roostertails in 1/6, 1/8 and 1/16 then you will be set. if your not a fly fisherman spinners for trout are the way to go. if your doing catch and release pinch the barbs and use single hooks when possible for less jaw damage to the fish. fly fishing is fun and very effective though.. just putting it out there ;)
 
troutdude

troutdude

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X 2. Get an ultralight spinning rod/reel set up.

In addition to using spinners, you can also use a bobber and bait (worm, Pautzke's eggs, power eggs, etc). You can also drift a worm. You can also plunk bait OFF of the bottom too...uh...where bait is allowed.
 
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sirsnagalot

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Okay, I have an 7ft ultra-light rod with 4lb test as well that I use for fishing trout in lakes already, so is there any method to drifting for them like steelhead as well? I bought some floating e-z eggs awhile back that say they are for trout but I have no idea on how to use them lol
 
brandon4455

brandon4455

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worms work very well where bait is allowed. i use a small corkies (the size of a salmon egg ) either chartruese,pink or orange and peg it to the top of a red barbless hook, and then slide half a worm up the hook. then i add desired amount of split shot and drift fish it. it works very well for cutthroat in coastal rivers when bait is allowed. it should also do good on low water summer steelhead. ez eggs might work, but probably not as effective as worms and pautzkies. you can also drift fish the spinners like you would for salmon and steelhead. also, if you can manage to do what i did.. use a trout bead. in peach,orange,red pegged 2 inches above a small egg hooks and use a corkie as a strike indicator set deep enough to where the hook will be above the bottom, and fling it out like a fly rod. do it while salmon are spawning. works like magic. it's hard to fling out though since there is no weight.. i had to whip it around like fly fishing. since that setup is mainly used while fly fishing.
 
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troutdude

troutdude

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Very well written--and great advice--Brandon!

BTW, I've had the best luck sometimes with either no split shot...or just one or two "BB" sized shot; on a small stream. And for larger streams, between 2 and 4 larger split shots work well. I also spread them out, so there's a foot or more between split shot. You'll get snagged on the bottom a lot less, than if you attach all of your weights on one spot on your line.
 
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chris61182

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So I want to start fishing for trout in rivers and streams but have never tried it before, what kind of tackle and fishing methods would you guys recommend? Where would be a great spot to go to do this as well I live in Hillsboro but I'm willing to drive out to spots that are easy access within an hour and a half.

My recommendation for methods would be to toss spinners, in particular I've found the most versatile size for rivers to be 1/8oz. You'll want a variety of colors, and being a visual fisherman (you'll need a good pair of polarized glasses too) I usually will be watching the fish for how they respond to my lure and change the color up, moving either lighter or darker, based on what is getting more attention.

As for where to go near the Hillsboro? That's simple, the Wilson River!

I am familiar with drifting for steelhead/salmon so if you could point out the differences for me that would be awesome. Also I am not a fly-fisherman and dont know how-to or have access any fly gear so I will be using a baitcaster reel with a 7ft medium action rod 1/4 - 3/4oz on probably 8lb line. I have other set ups to but primarily this will be the set up I would like to use if I can.

As others have said just use your ultralight spinning rig, it'll be way more fun.
 
M

Mad dog

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Flies under a clear float!!!

Get a variety of dark nymphs, beadheads, prince nymphs, hare's ear, copper johns, pheasant tails for small streams. For larger streams use small jigs and fish them like you would for steelhead. Also get some attractor dry flies and fly floatant....you will be surprised how effectively you can fish a dry fly with a clear float!
 
M

Mad dog

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Okay, I have an 7ft ultra-light rod with 4lb test as well that I use for fishing trout in lakes already, so is there any method to drifting for them like steelhead as well? I bought some floating e-z eggs awhile back that say they are for trout but I have no idea on how to use them lol

E-Z eggs....Sweet! Fish them just like you would for steelhead, just gear everything down for summer flows, #4 hook, 6 lb. leader connected to your mainline with a barrel swivel, a single E-Z egg on your hook. Leave a dropper off of the tag end of your mainline where it connects to your barrel swivel about 3" long and add splitshot until your bait glides just off of the river bottom. If the river bottom feels too grabby or you get hung up take a shot off....let it glide naturally! Early summer on some rivers and you'll have just about as good of a chance at hooking a steelhead as well as trout!
 
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sirsnagalot

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Thanks for all the suggestions, now where can i go to use these techniques that you just told me about? I want to go to the crooked river sometime this summer for some camping since my friends and I like going to prineville resevoir
 
M

Mad dog

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Flies under a clear float!!!

Get a variety of dark nymphs, beadheads, prince nymphs, hare's ear, copper johns, pheasant tails for small streams. For larger streams use small jigs and fish them like you would for steelhead. Also get some attractor dry flies and fly floatant....you will be surprised how effectively you can fish a dry fly with a clear float!

DAMMER!!!....forgot stoneflies! All sizes....the Salmonflies are hatching right now and the golden stones are probably starting!

I would suggest trying different coastal rivers until you find one you like to fish, some are better than others! Most Cascade streams have good native trout populations and fish better as summer progresses and flows begin to drop.
 
X

XFactorTackle

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I typically stay out of these type of threads because I obviously have a biased opinion and don't want to come off as a spammer. That being said, I catch lots of trout in small streams and I never use anything bigger then a #8 Octopus hook. As far as how to fish I like to drift fish small streams. I will tie a barrel swivel in between my mainline and leader, when I tie on the leader I just don't trim the tag end, that way I can attach split shot to the tag end itself. This is an old school method for drift fishing and it works really well in small streams where you don't need lots of weight.

Another method that works well in larger streams and or small rivers is to use an egg sinker on your mainline. I will use this method anywhere that I can get away with 1/8 oz to 3/4 oz, even on bigger rivers. It has been my experience that when using the egg sinker, I tend to loose much less gear.

Also, don't be afraid to run braided line. I have a light 7ft rod with a 1000 series (small) spinning reel that I use high vis yellow braided line on and even when fishing in low clear water I can catch plenty of fish. I use the high vis line so I can always see where I'm at and the reason I like to use braided line on that setup is basically just to have the muscle to undo snags without breaking everything off. I know some guys are against braided line in general but when you have 20lb braided line in a 4lb or 6lb diameter you can fit more or the same on the reel and not worry about it breaking when you get stuck. As long as you have 4 or 6lb leader you won't have to worry about fish being "line shy" and you'll catch plenty of them.

That's my 2 cents. Have fun out there.
 
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strawberry shortcake

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Wedding rings, worms, and a baitcaster (though a bailed reel is okay). And sometimes just a worm on a hook. I have several different rods depending on season and location. Keep the sinkers lighter than you think you need. Trout are chargers so you really don't need to keep the bait stationary. Go bigger with the hook to keep smaller trout off your line. If you happen to catch a no-fighter mountain white fish. Keep it, keep it, keep it. Great tasting flesh.

My aunt is the greatest trout catcher I know. She tears apart the worms (at least 3rds, if not 4ths) and uses one piece at a time on her hook, and casts out in eddys and such. If she doesn't get a bite right away, she reels in and heads on to the next spot. That woman can cover 2 miles in an hour and come back with her limit plus stories of throwing a lot more back.

In my opinion, fast moving rivers and streams with snags, rocks, and bends are the best!
 
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strawberry shortcake

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I love it when trout chase the bait. They also tend to swallow it hook, line, and sinker. Sometimes I get the nibble thing first but usually it's a sudden strike that can jar the sleepiest fisher wide awake. I have at times cut a fish loose that gave me an air-show. Trouble is, they fight the hook so fiercely that gut hooked fish already have started to bleed from a likely mortal gut-tear by the time I land them, and smaller ones fight just as hard as bigger ones, especially in the fall when they have plenty of energy. Swimming in the spring snow-melt takes a lot of energy so the fight isn't so great.

If you happen to be near the stretch of river I fish in, that whooping sound would be me when the fight is on.
 

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