Got wood (plastic)?


Bake

Member
Does anyone throw crankbaits? I was thinking some of my old Rapalas and Lazy Ikes would be great for swinging on a river. They come in many different sizes, different colors combinations, different shapes, and floating & sinking models.

Buy yourself an airbrush, and the sky is the limit...
 
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C_Run

Well-known member

I remembered this old thread.
 

troutdude

Well-known member
Moderator
We used to have a member on here who used to cast and retrieve plugs; with GREAT success! He was in the southern part of the state. I believe that he primarily fished the Sprague, Klamath, Wood, and Williamson Rivers...if memory serves me. And he always caught trout which nearly hit the 30" mark too boot!

BTW the copper colored original Daredevle spoon...is one of the 50 best lures of all time. So it's no wonder that the copper plug above, did so well!

EDIT: @Bake; did you mean Lazy Ike's?
 

troutdude

Well-known member
Moderator
No biggie. I was just curious. I have seen some of them. But have never used them. Would love to know if they are effective.
 

Bake

Member
No biggie. I was just curious. I have seen some of them. But have never used them. Would love to know if they are effective.
I first started ('77 to '79) using them in S. Dakota, in the Black Hills, (trout & largemouth bass), and some of the stock ponds out in the prairie (largemouth bass, & small pike). Then in '80, I moved to Texas where I chased Largemouths and was a small tournament fisherman. We fished plastic grape colored worms, safety pin spinner baits, Rapala minnows, and Lazy Ikes, in that order. I liked the Ikes because they had half the action, half the depth, at the twice retrieval speed of the Flatfishes. Another lure I was thinking about is the "J" Plug (Seattle, in the '50's). A lot of guys down here troll a small "j" Plug type for the Kokanee salmon (I believe they are landlocked sockeyes)...
 
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Bake

Member
Correct. And a few of our lakes also have what we call Chinokanee (land locked Chinook salmon). Green Peter Reservoir is one.
Do your Chinokanee grow to a pretty good size? Our KoKanee don't get much bigger than a large 16 to 18"trout...
 

Bake

Member
Are your Chinoknaee pretty large? Our Kokanee are not much more than 16 to 18" long. and more than 4 years old...
 

troutdude

Well-known member
Moderator
Any Kokanee, here in Oregon (which is where I assumed you are), that hits 16" or more is a MONSTER! Most don't get any larger than 14".

However Chinokanee is a different story. One of our OFFers caught one from Green Peter, a few years ago, that was 10 pounds (something like 28 or 29" if memory serves).
 

Bake

Member
Any Kokanee, here in Oregon (which is where I assumed you are), that hits 16" or more is a MONSTER! Most don't get any larger than 14".

However Chinokanee is a different story. One of our OFFers caught one from Green Peter, a few years ago, that was 10 pounds (something like 28 or 29" if memory serves).
WOW! 28 or 29" Chinokanee is a MONSTER in my book. Actually, I'm' down here in Atwater, California. Atwater is in the north end (South of Sacramento, and north of Fresno) of the San Joaquin Valley. Without the irrigation system, this area would be a desert. Most of the lakes (half full) and rivers you can see on a map are dry 3 to 6 months a year. If I want to go fishing, it's an hour to an hour and a half to get to real water...
 
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Aervax

Active member
I use wood and plastic for trout casting from the bank on rivers and lakes. l catch some nice browns, cutthroat, rainbows and redsides. Luckycraft and Yozuri suspending jerk baits, broken back Rapalas, and Maglips as well as the old timey Flatfish. Our best wild Bonneville Cutthroat day ever was on a large reservoir at 6500 feet the spring of 2010. It was literally the day after ice out. My main fishing pal and I were throwing broken back Rapalas from the bank and released 80 fish ranging from 16"-27" long. That was an epic once in a lifetime day, but there were many other days in between of trout in respectable numbers that were of nice size. I have used all of the above with good success for trout on big rivers - sometimes swinging, sometimes working current and structure in deep holes, and more frequently retrieving across current in what I would call a semi-swing. They definitely work for trout. Go give it a try.
 

Bake

Member
Not living in Oregon, my knowledge of the Fish & Game Reg's is kinda thin. I remember having to change hooks on my crankbaits somewhere. I would remove the stock treble hooks and replace them with 2/0 or 3/0 Siwashs. While closing the eye, I would crush the barbs. I now do that with all of my hooks (everywhere). Much easier to "Catch-&-Release"...
 
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