Fly and spinning from fishing float tube

Stealbowtrout

New member
Hi everyone

At the beginning of the summer I made a goal for myself to explore as many waters as possible around and in Portland (I moved to Portland in December of 2019, so I have very little knowledge of all the hot spots etc)

However, I've found some interesting spots but feel like bank fishing limits me quite a bit especially with the healthy bush and tree population on the banks of many places. I fly fish and fish on a spinning rod also. I mostly target trout, bass, and sunfish for now.

I was looking at fishing floating tubes as a good alternative to boats and kayaks financially and space wise, but have not experienced it yet. It would be my main way of fishing for casual after work going out and fishing for a few hours. My question to y'all who have experience with fishing from a float tube if it is worth it as a casual piece of equipment. Also I'd love it if you could help me with your personal pros/cons about itaw7.JPG
 

BrandonBeach

Active member
Ok, I have one so, I’ll take a shot at this.

Float tube pro’s :
Light, easy storage and transportation. Affordable way to fish some new water. Carry a distance if necessary. Comfortable and easy to cast from, if your good with casting while sitting. Easy to maneuver with kick fins, a hands free operation. Great fun on a lake on a calm day Or VERY EASY stream floats.

cons:
Not good if You have to cover a lot of water, can be tiresome kickfinning for extended lengths of time. Terrible in a moderate wind, you are at the winds mercy. Not great drifting in streams with any difficult water. Waders are a must have, would hate to get dumped off in waders even with a life vest. (I have Serious safety concerns with float tubes in rapids or streams with dead falls) Not great for floating streams in low water.

These days, I rather fish from a kayak or pontoon boat.

bottom line:
Float tubes are fun, just pick time and place Carefully.

IMHO
for what it’s worth

Be safe.

BB
 

Stealbowtrout

New member
Your opinion is super helpful, thanks for taking the time to answer my questions!
I have not really put any thought on the safety side of a tube in different conditions, all though I only imagined I would use it on lakes and small streams that don't have a strong current. For example, I was thinking specifically about using it at cook park on the Tualatin river.
 

Socaaron

Member
Your opinion is super helpful, thanks for taking the time to answer my questions!
I have not really put any thought on the safety side of a tube in different conditions, all though I only imagined I would use it on lakes and small streams that don't have a strong current. For example, I was thinking specifically about using it at cook park on the Tualatin river.
I think for those waters you'd be perfectly fine. I've only used mine in lakes to date, but never plan to use it in any waterway with current. As Brandon mentioned if there's a wind you will get blown about. I do like that a float tube is packable enough for short hikes, it makes some of the mountain lakes supremely more fishable due to the brushy or limited bank access. I HIGHLY recommend if you do indeed purchase one skip the regular "duck" fins($50-60) and get the Outcast thrust fins($99) they are a bit more exspensive but much easier to cover water and requires sooooo much less effort for regular use your legs will thank you... especially if you ever kick troll.
I do love my float tube but it has specific applications
 

brandon4455

Well-known member
Float tubes do have their cons, if you are fishing a very large body of water it can be a pain to cover water. I routinely kick 1-2 miles and kicked over 5 in my tube last month. But the heavy wind isn’t as bad to go against as it is in a pontoon or small rowboat imo.

another advantage to a float tube is you can use your legs to change positioning to have the wind at your back and that is especially handy for a fly angler or just to be comfortable and not have wind in your face, without having to pull anchor or row. Because float tubes have such a short set up time and are easy to move and you spend more time fishing, I believe this equates to (usually) more fish and makes it a fine choice for short half day or after work trips. I’ve been float tube fishing for 10 years now and it is still my favorite way to fish lakes.
My tube is rigged with a 5pb folding grapnel anchor and a Garmin striker depth sounder. They’re quite customizable for the kind of fishing you like to do.
 

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Stealbowtrout

New member
I think for those waters you'd be perfectly fine. I've only used mine in lakes to date, but never plan to use it in any waterway with current. As Brandon mentioned if there's a wind you will get blown about. I do like that a float tube is packable enough for short hikes, it makes some of the mountain lakes supremely more fishable due to the brushy or limited bank access. I HIGHLY recommend if you do indeed purchase one skip the regular "duck" fins($50-60) and get the Outcast thrust fins($99) they are a bit more exspensive but much easier to cover water and requires sooooo much less effort for regular use your legs will thank you... especially if you ever kick troll.
I do love my float tube but it has specific applications
Any mountain lakes you would recommend?
 

Socaaron

Member
Harriet is always a good one on the tube, Marion further away but some really nice fish that make the hike with it. And finally Round lake complicated to get to now but very lightly pressured and always produces on the dry for me. Not really a great time to check them out with the fires and forest closures but they're worth the trip in the future.
 

Socaaron

Member
Float tubes do have their cons, if you are fishing a very large body of water it can be a pain to cover water. I routinely kick 1-2 miles and kicked over 5 in my tube last month. But the heavy wind isn’t as bad to go against as it is in a pontoon or small rowboat imo.

another advantage to a float tube is you can use your legs to change positioning to have the wind at your back and that is especially handy for a fly angler or just to be comfortable and not have wind in your face, without having to pull anchor or row. Because float tubes have such a short set up time and are easy to move and you spend more time fishing, I believe this equates to (usually) more fish and makes it a fine choice for short half day or after work trips. I’ve been float tube fishing for 10 years now and it is still my favorite way to fish lakes.
My tube is rigged with a 5pb folding grapnel anchor and a Garmin striker depth sounder. They’re quite customizable for the kind of fishing you like to do.
Nice Cranebow!
 

brandon4455

Well-known member
Nice Cranebow!
Thanks! I gotta say I was disappointed with the average size and condition of fish in crane this year, lots of skinny fish. That was one of the few I caught that was well fed. but the numbers are better than i have ever seen. Still some monsters around but not like it use to be. I got into larger fish from the tube elsewhere this year.
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Stealbowtrout

New member
Harriet is always a good one on the tube, Marion further away but some really nice fish that make the hike with it. And finally Round lake complicated to get to now but very lightly pressured and always produces on the dry for me. Not really a great time to check them out with the fires and forest closures but they're worth the trip in the future.
Yeah for sure, I'm not even fishing in general right now. But definitely after all this clears up!
 
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