Float sizes for steelhead

M
mrlindeman
I have seen some videos on using very heavy floats and weight systems for steelhead. Such as 3/4 to even 2 OZ. My question is, What would someone here recommend. My float rod is rated for 1/8 to 1/2. I have heard that the more swift and deep the water.... the bigger the float. I have also heard that it is personal preferance and nothing more. I just dont want to spend extra money on gear I prob dont need, I pack light :)

My assumption though is, that 1/8 to 1/2 should cover most if not all water here in the state for steelhead and I should be fine. I just wanted a second opinion, and could not find what I was looking for on the web.

Thanks in advance;)
 
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M
markasd
I don't think its a personal preference, I've been wrong once. The deeper swifter water will require more weight to get you offering down in the zone at the beginning of the drift and not halfway through, past the fish holding in the top end of the run.
Say your fishing a run - you cast a 1/2 oz set up to the top end and notice that the bobber stop didn't hit the top of the bobber until you were past the fish, or halfway through the run. Add another inline and run at 1 oz and notice that after the bobber/offering hit the water that the bobber stop hits the top of the bobber way sooner - a second or two after touchdown and bobber is in the drift.
You'll need to get out on the bank and play with it - trial and error. You'll figure it out to the point of going to water you've never fished and knowing about where to start, what weights will get you in the money.

Let us know what you find out..
 
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D
Drew9870
I think you could do fine with a 1/2oz most places, but like Mark basically said, you couldn't go wrong packing a 1oz around, a 2+oz is for eggs imo.

I have a little trick I could show you sometime, I use it for Salmon though, you know those chunks of lead with the rubber insert? I like to set a small one about 8-10 inches off my eggs to get them down into the strike zone right away.
 
M
mrlindeman
Thanks guys! Those were both great responses. I will pack an extra 1 OZ and some bumped up weight just in case! :)

btw I love those weights you are talking about Drew. They do seem to shuttle the line down there early as hell when needed
 
A
alseaalumaweld
3/8 west coast float!
 
J
JeannaJigs
mrlindeman said:
I have also heard that it is personal preferance and nothing more.

That works if your preference is to not catch fish ;)

Current and depth dictate depth, good points above. Pretty sure there's regs though about having your weight 18" above your hook/lure however so I wouldn't be putting weight close to your glob of eggs, if eggs are your thing...
 
brandon4455
brandon4455
jigs are better then bait under a bobber if you ask me. and like alseaalumaweld stated 3/8oz west coast own. i dont really use gear anymore but when i did steelhead fish i used 3/8oz west coast with a trolling weight if i was using a smaller jig that was under rated for the size of the float.I don't think i have ever used anything over 1/2oz for steelhead
i don't think theres any need for a 1oz weight for bobber fishing for em.Thats just nuts. i use to use 1oz weights with shrimp for nooks Lol
 
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S
steelhead_stalkers
I would say you should never need more than 1 oz at the most. I fished a 1/2 oz float on the main umpqua and caught steelhead and thats huge water. If the hole your fishing is so boily you need over an ounce then you probably will not catch steelhead there. Also, if the current is so fast you need more than an ounce to get down its probably not a good float spot for steelhead. Good float water for steelhead is between 4 and 8 feet and about walking speed. Of course that's perfect water and you can catch them in other water but much more than 10-12 feet and the steelhead get harder to catch on floats. Sounds like you have the perfect rod for steelhead float fishing.
 
J
jawjacker
I have a float rod with those same ratings and it's super sweet for steelhead. It works best in low to medium flows. When the waters high and really moving I drift fish on the bottom in different locations than I would typically use a float. When the river is on the verge of being blown out plunk copious amounts of lead right next to the bank.
 
M
mrlindeman
Rocking replies guys, Thanks!!!! :) :)
 

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