Farmed Steelhead

K

koboabe

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did you guys know they are farming and selling steelhead?
I wonder if these are allowed to swim in salt or if they are fed pellets and dye.
nothing like a large trout dyed red
 
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F

FishSchooler

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did you guys know they are farming and selling steelhead?
I wonder if these are allowed to swim in salt or if they are fed pellets and dye.
nothing like a large trout dyed red

you can buy steelhead at the hatcheries but I think they come as juvenile fish and you need to raise them :)
 
T

The Nothing

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did you guys know they are farming and selling steelhead?
I wonder if these are allowed to swim in salt or if they are fed pellets and dye.
nothing like a large trout dyed red

Yep, I knew that.

Most salmon/steelhead farming is done in Canada and South America (Chile). They also farm Chinook and Coho. They're usually kept in large pens in tidal waters. They're fed antibiotic packed pellet foods, and do horrible things to the ecosystem.

Friends don't let friends eat farmed fish (except freshwater stuff like trout, catfish, tilapia).
 
T

Thuggin4Life

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I wouldn't eat a farmed fish. Even trout need to be in there natural environment for a while to make the meat good to go. Salmon are farmed in big pens in the salt(thats how we got some atlantic salmon in the pacific) and a fed all kinds of chemicals and dye so I would expect the same for steelhead. But your right they might not have to do it in the salt. I think its funny when your look at the fish section in the local grocery store and the have plump nasty looking trout a banged up from being in a tank and all the salmon meat says color added which = farmed. You have to go to a fish market to get the real thing. Also ask if the fish you are ordering in a resteraunt is wild. If they don't know than its farmed or they might know its farmed. If it doesn't say wild on the menu its probably not wild. Some resteraunts like mcgrath's have a board that will tell you were there fish are being caught. I think it funny how you can go to the coast and still have to buy famed fish from a resteraunt so don't be fooled just because your at the source doen't mean you get the goods.
 
T

The Nothing

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Hey now. The local grocery store can be good. What is important is that they follow Monteray Bay Aquarium's Seafood Watch Program. Seafood Watch was created to help you choose seafood that's good for you, and good for the oceans. At the consumer level they do this with color codes. Items with green tags have sustainable resources, non-desctructive catching methods, and limited to no by-catch.

Salmon is a great example of this.

Green Tag: Sockeye, Coho, Chinook Salmon from Alaska only Alaskan commercial salmon fishing is considered a sustainable resource. Fish can be netted if if they're using "tooth nets" which do not trap fish at the gills. Long lining is the prefered method.

Yellow Tag: Sockeye, Coho, Chinook, Keta from Oregon and Washington. These fisheries are not considered sustainable. Catch methods are the same as Alaska.

Red Tag: Farmed fish. Bad.

Freshwater fish are often Green tag items because freshwater farming is normally done in private ponds, not pumped with antibiotics, have their own filtration systems to keep potentially toxic water out of the environment. They're completely contained.

I know New Season's market is one place that you can see this in action.

PS: did you know they also farm sturgeon?
 
T

Thuggin4Life

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Yep, I knew that.

Most salmon/steelhead farming is done in Canada and South America (Chile). They also farm Chinook and Coho. They're usually kept in large pens in tidal waters. They're fed antibiotic packed pellet foods, and do horrible things to the ecosystem.

Friends don't let friends eat farmed fish (except freshwater stuff like trout, catfish, tilapia).

You must have wrote this while I was typing. Well said. An I was unaware of the tag deal so green and yellow means nonfarmed but comercially caught. I'm ok with comercial fishing. But if there is a green tag with the color added tag i won't get it I'll look next time I'm at the grocery store. I'll eat farmed trout....after its been in the wild for a year.
 
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Y

youngbuck307

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yea they been farming sturgeon for a while now.... probably how they can sell baby sturgeon for your fish tanks
 
Y

youngbuck307

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Im not sure my dad had one a while back... was the coolest thing! ill see if i can't find out where it came from my sister got it when she was really getting into fishtanks and stuff
 
M

metalmania

ODFW has a list of there sources for fish stocking, as well as contact info from the farms. I don't have a link but it shouldn't be hard to find.
 
H

halibuthitman

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heres the real kicker.... those south american salmon/steelhead farms are american companies like tyson, snow pack, and gordtons.... and they are subsidized by american tax dollars, even though saltwater aquaculture in the united states has a 10 year motatorium on it so american tax dollars can study its negative effects..... its like giving guns to the contras...:think:
 
K

koboabe

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Yep, I knew that.

Most salmon/steelhead farming is done in Canada and South America (Chile). They also farm Chinook and Coho. They're usually kept in large pens in tidal waters. They're fed antibiotic packed pellet foods, and do horrible things to the ecosystem.

Friends don't let friends eat farmed fish (except freshwater stuff like trout, catfish, tilapia).

Agreed, at least the freshwater farms don't spread as much bacteria and fungus to the local environment.
I doubt I will ever eat a farmed piece of Salmon... man I love the NW.

there are some cool new (self contained) saltwater farms, but the feed and anti-biotics are horrid.
 
K

koboabe

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Love the seafood watch... great program and there lil bill fold fits in your wallet.
 
Y

Yentz

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While it sure doesn't taste like a wild one, I certainly think Farmed Steelhead/Salmon/Trout is a heck of a lot better than Harvested Steelhead/Salmon/Trout.(If it's done correctly. The cheap places in south America that destroy their own ecosystem are downright disgusting)

Farming is sustainable, and doesn't impact the fish in the rivers. So more fish for us to catch, and more fish for other folks to eat.
 
T

Thuggin4Life

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While it sure doesn't taste like a wild one, I certainly think Farmed Steelhead/Salmon/Trout is a heck of a lot better than Harvested Steelhead/Salmon/Trout.(If it's done correctly. The cheap places in south America that destroy their own ecosystem are downright disgusting)

Farming is sustainable, and doesn't impact the fish in the rivers. So more fish for us to catch, and more fish for other folks to eat.

I think you need to bit more research on this.
 
Y

Yentz

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I think you need to bit more research on this.

Hmm, looks like your right. Did some research on it, and I gotta admit. It's not sustainable right now. Perhaps they will make some breakthroughs and get it working right, but for now, looks like it's eat wild or don't eat it.
 
H

halibuthitman

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While it sure doesn't taste like a wild one, I certainly think Farmed Steelhead/Salmon/Trout is a heck of a lot better than Harvested Steelhead/Salmon/Trout.(If it's done correctly. The cheap places in south America that destroy their own ecosystem are downright disgusting)

Farming is sustainable, and doesn't impact the fish in the rivers. So more fish for us to catch, and more fish for other folks to eat.

british columbia fish farms lose an average of 30,000 fish a year into the inside passage, atlantic salmon are now the no.2 threat to the british columbia steelhead runs on vancouver island. There are so many rogue atlantics in the san jaun islands that myself and a friend who lives there caught 2 in 11 days, canada keeps 3 boats on constant standby to try to recapture these rogue fish, and I saw those boats out fishing 4 times in 2 months, atlantic salmon farming would be legal in the u.s if it was a responsible industry.
 
T

The Nothing

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Didn't they lose some genetically alters Kings last year?
...that'll be fun...
 

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