Drift fishing rig under bobber

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FishSchooler

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I have been thinking about how to fish with a bobber over a course of very different underwater features, like a shallow riffle that turns into a deep hole, then into a run or something. If you have a normal bobber fishing rig, you can't really fish the whole area, whereas if you have a bobber/drift fishing rig, you can. I know that bobber fishing is a type of drift fishing but what about this rig: your normal bobber fishing float over with a bobber stop on your main. Then tie a barrel swivel where you are going to have your leader, then leave the tag long and crimp on a little split shot. Then tie on around 3 feet of your leader. Then your drift fishing hooks. So then when you cast into the flats, this is effectively just like drift fishing, letting the rig drift along, then when it goes into the hole, the bait will suspend to wherever you put the bobberstop. Does this rig have a different result than fishing a riffle with a bobber?
 
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bigdog

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you lost me on what it is going to look like or what it might do but im new to this so maybe i just dont get what you are saying
CJ
 
Raincatcher

Raincatcher

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Less than 50 feet from the Santiam River! :)
Mangled...

Mangled...

You know, I was past my fiftieth birthday before I found out I actually have a bit of artistic talent. I always mangled stick figures before finding out that if I could look at it I could draw it. I hate to say it, FishSchooler, but, I have no idea what it would look like,let alone what it would do in or under the water. Sorry.
Barb
 
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FishSchooler

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Guess I'll have to take pics of it or draw it and post em. :cool:
 
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ArcticAmoeba

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You are just wanting to cast your drift float rig into the bottom of riffles, and them let it drop into a hole, or tailout. The only problem is that this is not an effective way to drift fish. You need to be drifting the shallow riffles, for Steelhead, Coho, and Chinook, in that order through the riffle. Pikeminnow hold in the deeper holes behind rapids, and riffs. If you set it up how you explained, what is stopping your line from traveling down river faster than you drift rig, only to run up to the stop knot, so you essentially have a bunch of slack, followed by how ever much "leader" you now have for your bobber stop depth. Just use a slip float to drift deep holes where fish hold, and traditionally drift the riffles, dont fish two different depths in one swing, it might mean that you are fishing in between the holding zones...
 
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FishSchooler

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Well, yes the slack will be a problem, but the line floats, so the rig will sink and the line will stop once it hits the bottom. Bobber fishing just seems easier to me, even though I haven't caught anything on either... :confused:
 
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ArcticAmoeba

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Well, yes the slack will be a problem, but the line floats, so the rig will sink and the line will stop once it hits the bottom. Bobber fishing just seems easier to me, even though I haven't caught anything on either... :confused:

Yes, the slack would be a problem, how are you planning on feeling a strike?:think: If you have ever drift fished, you will notice that any slack in your line will get pulled downriver pretty quickly, and having a slip float creating more drag, on slack line would worsen the situation I think, making not only feeling the strike near impossible, but also the hook set, if you did feel one would not stick, because you can't pull up 10 plus feet of floppy slacked line and then set the hook. Also, wouldn't your rig sinking to the bottom be counter intuitive for Salmon fishing? I try to fish my bait, and lures at least a foot from the tops of the rocks. Don't snag very often, and when I do, I know that the hook is just stuck on top of the rock, not down under its front side, like if you happen to drift to deep. It takes a quick snap up, high stick style, and it is off, and continued on its drift. Getting caught up UNDER rocks is what eats your gear. By the sound of things, it seems like your rig would get snagged up a lot. Slip floats have their conditions, time, and place when they can't be beat, but drift fishing is more adaptable to different sections of water. Especially the ones on the Clack. Almost no place to use a drift float over drift fishing. Maybe one place right off the top of my head...Simple drift fishing, is far more productive than bobber fishing on the Clackamas, it is just the way the river bed is shaped..
 
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FishSchooler

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yeah, I didn't snag 2 times at the clack, just lost a lot of eggs. Snagged once, thats all. Got it out fine. Hey... erm... can you... um... maybe... like... er... start... like a... um... camp thingymajigighoogloginyminagaratchulagah... during winter break... for like... er... winter... steelies... for some kids... and... kinda... teach us... Argh I can't finish this... :doh::lol: Basically a camp to fish for winter steels during winter break (if you dont have work) and give some peeps something to do... like an OFF fishing week thingymajigighoogloginyminagaratchulagah for everyone on the forum at a good park on the... clack... you know? I like really need some advice...and i really want to see the look on all of my familys' faces when I heft a 6 pound fish... just... can't... get... that... oppurtu...nity........ :doh::confused:(if you can, you dont have to, just a thought, and other OFF people can just make it a little gathering/camp week...) gar I can't do this... just not me... :doh:
 
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ArcticAmoeba

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Did you fish the above explained rig in the Clack? If you did, where? I just know that drift fishing requires nearly no slack in the line, it is how you feel, and bounce bottom, the two or three times you should during your normal drift. Without a taught line it would be impossible to feel the bottom ticks, and be able to pull up on your rod to get your bait, or lure up again. It is really the only way to effectivly hook into fish...with a taugh line. Just practice drift fishing, and bobber fishing, and use them when they are called for in the river section you are fishing. Hate to say it but all the info you would ned to target, and hook into fish is on the Forums. Everything you need to make up rigs, and where, and how to fish certain sections of water, especially on the Clack, is on OFF. a lot of my posts, with pictures, share quite a bit of information on where I fished, and boated/banked it, as well as what section of water I was on is all there. Just use the Search feature available to users. The only thing that I can't show, or tell you is technique. That is something that is different, person, to person. Everybody does something just a little different, to catch fish. Once you really learn to drift fish properly, keep a journal, and record everytime you go fishing, what you used, lures, or bait, what colors they were, how much split shot, hooks, and leader used if applicable, weather conditions, like barometer, air temp. & water temp. & perhaps most important, river levels. And finally what you caught, species, weight, length, condition, if anything at all. And time of day landed. My journal is mostly blanks in the "Retained/Released" category that I record the fish species, sex, Brat or Wild genes, length, weight,(approx. if wild) & if I retained, or released the fish. It helps me have more consistency in my fishing outings, and has since become helpful in helping me pick what to use, and what color, for a specific, species, during a certain season. I break it down that far, and it has made me a better fisherman. But do search the forums for help. It is there. And, I would not like to do a fishing clinic, as I do not tell, or teach anyone how to fish, that is not my place to do so. I just show people how I fish, what I fish and how it works. From there it is your own decision on how to apply, or adapt it to your own methods. The only clinics I put on are with spinners in front of the snaggers! YOWWW!!:cool:
 
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FishSchooler

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I didn't fish that rig, its just a thought. I just thought, what fish would be in the clack in november? I might want to try it again for my b-day... Oh well, headin up to the tualatin next wednesday cause mom has a company picnic at cook park! Wow what are the chances of that?!;)
 
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Axlave

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My Bobber Rig

My Bobber Rig

Here is a bobber rig I use.
 

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XFactorTackle

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I have been thinking about how to fish with a bobber over a course of very different underwater features, like a shallow riffle that turns into a deep hole, then into a run or something. If you have a normal bobber fishing rig, you can't really fish the whole area, whereas if you have a bobber/drift fishing rig, you can. I know that bobber fishing is a type of drift fishing but what about this rig: your normal bobber fishing float over with a bobber stop on your main. Then tie a barrel swivel where you are going to have your leader, then leave the tag long and crimp on a little split shot. Then tie on around 3 feet of your leader. Then your drift fishing hooks. So then when you cast into the flats, this is effectively just like drift fishing, letting the rig drift along, then when it goes into the hole, the bait will suspend to wherever you put the bobberstop. Does this rig have a different result than fishing a riffle with a bobber?

I see what your getting at. This is drift fishing with a strike indicator...sort of. I've float fished like that for a couple years, but with a bank sinker instead of split shot. The way I do it, you would feel the lead on the bottom on occasion, that's why I added the "sort of" part. Basically, your float fishing and just using a different type of lead to get your setup down. Because your not feeling every bump on the bottom, your not going to feel the bite like you do while drift fishing, instead you'll be watching your float. Like others have said, your going to loose gear on the riffles or just not be in the zone at all.

If your fishing the bank, your best bet is to bring 2 rods. The best way (in my opinion) to fish a riffle is to drift fish. Another word of advice...master one technique before trying the other. I know guys are drawn to float fishing because it looks easier...I disagree. Once mastered, float fishing is a great way to catch salmon and steelhead but there is more to it then it looks. If your weight is not properly setup you could spend day after day fishing where the fish are but not be in the zone, which is obviously a waste of time. At least with drift fishing, you either feel the bottom or you don't, if you don't add more weight.

Do what your comfortable with, but I recommend starting with drift fishing. For one thing, a standard 8' 6" Medium or Medium Light rod with a spinning reel will be just fine. But don't bother trying to float fish with anything shorter then a 10' 6" rod...which is a challenge to land a fish by yourself. I know guys use shorter rods, but the main challenge is keeping the line tight on a long drift as well as being able to pick that slack up to set the hook when your float goes down. Anyway, enough of my rambling.
 
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