Clevis sizes

K

Kelkay

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I see in Jed's book for french blades he goes up to a size 5 blade, with a size 2 clevis as the largest clevis used. Do most people here use that same size for a size 5 blade? I mainly have size 2 and 3 clevis for spinners. I need to get some more size 4 blades, I have no size 5 blades. Just wondering about the clevis now that I looked at his book. R & B show a size 2 clevis for their blades from size 1-5. So I have also read to use a size 2 clevis with a size 2 blade and so on. This does get a little confusing.
 
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K

Kelkay

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Yes, thank you for posting the links here. I have seen them. My point is that I am seeing different clevis sizes for different blades, and it seems that there is no hard and fast rule that people agree on. I would of thought that a size 3 clevis would work up to a size 4 blade. (of any type) But I see different charts, with in many cases different clevis info. It is confusing to me. I hear Jed is the one to really listen to, but he lists size 2 as the largest. I need to order size 4 blades, and I have no size 5 blades at all. But now I am confused what clevis sizes to go with. Also, each blade type may require going back to a size 3 blade with a size 3 clevis if it is not a French style blade. I just wanted to see what other people thought about this. I want my spinners to do well, and I like to hear people's experiences on this.
 
N

ninja2010

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i don't stick to hard and fast rules... here's my take: clevises play a key role in the rotation of the blade. go as big as you need to without throwing off the rotation, ie: too big a clevis could introduce wobble due to imbalance as the blade rotates around the shaft. it's best to test.

a #5 blade thumps real slow and hard, so the bigger clevises might not help. that being said, i've only gone as big as #4 french blade and i use a #3 clevis... works for me.
 
K

Kelkay

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That is kind of how I feel like it, up to reading Jed's book. A size 3 clevis is actually fairly big in my opinion. I cannot think of a commercial spinner that has a bigger clevis that I have noticed. I have a few big spinners that I have bought in the past. Most of mine are size 3 and under that I bought. The ones I really enjoy making are the large spinners...size 3 and 4. I have only made about 3 in size 4 though. I plan to make some very large spinners like size 5 for the bigger bass. I will go with a size 2 treble hook for them. I use a lot of size 4 and 6 trebles for the sizes I usually make. Anyway, I am sure there will be more ideas on the clevis size thing. I don't mind buying size 4 and 5 clevis, if they are really needed. I will wait and see what people say, and weigh the pros and cons.
 
R

rickman

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Unless you're making some "huge" lures, you shouldn't need go larger than a (3). I use sizes 1,2 and 3.
 
K

Kelkay

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Thanks for your thoughts...that was my feeling originally, till I read the book. Still I want to know what others think, and the experiences they have had. I appreciate your comments.
 
J

Jacks Tackle

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We recomend a #2 size clevis for all casting spinners from size #1 to #5 when using french blades, however a #3 will work well also we just feel the #2 is a better choice. I would not use #4 clevis for french blades at all.

RB
 
K

Kelkay

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Thank you, well that clears it up for the french style blades. What about colorado or willow leaf blades?
 
F

FishFinger

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My two cents..........

I agree with most everything that has been said thus far. However, choosing the correct clevis is also affected by the location of the hole punched into the blade.

For example, a hole punched close to the end of the blade might well require a smaller clevis than one punched further down the blade. A way to verify the "correct" clevis would be to check the distance between the wire and the amount of blade above the hole. I.E. if the distance is more then half way between the blade and the wire, a smaller clevis is in order. Conversely if the distance is smaller than 1/2 a larger clevis is needed.

Establishing a equal distance between wire and top of the blade (as it sits in the clevis saddle) will get you closer to the right clevis selection. Of course I advocate you test the action of your prototype to ensure the action and wobble (or lack of) fits your needs.

Recently I have been twisting up a grip of #7 Fatal Flash blades. Being a bigger blade one might assume a larger clevis should be needed. But, based on the amount of metal above the hole a # 2 clevis is the right choice for this application. Yet on many #4 blades it takes a #3 for the correct action. Having tried both 2's and 4's on the same configuration, it happened to be #3's that carried the day.
 
K

Kelkay

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I never thought about it like that. That is good info to keep in mind, thank you!
 
N

ninja2010

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pay good heed to the wise words of fishfinger and jacks tackle... for they make spinners even the fish gods fear.
 
K

Kelkay

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Thank you, I sure will pay special attention to their advise.
 
J

Jacks Tackle

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My two cents..........

I agree with most everything that has been said thus far. However, choosing the correct clevis is also affected by the location of the hole punched into the blade.

For example, a hole punched close to the end of the blade might well require a smaller clevis than one punched further down the blade. A way to verify the "correct" clevis would be to check the distance between the wire and the amount of blade above the hole. I.E. if the distance is more then half way between the blade and the wire, a smaller clevis is in order. Conversely if the distance is smaller than 1/2 a larger clevis is needed.

Establishing a equal distance between wire and top of the blade (as it sits in the clevis saddle) will get you closer to the right clevis selection. Of course I advocate you test the action of your prototype to ensure the action and wobble (or lack of) fits your needs.

Recently I have been twisting up a grip of #7 Fatal Flash blades. Being a bigger blade one might assume a larger clevis should be needed. But, based on the amount of metal above the hole a # 2 clevis is the right choice for this application. Yet on many #4 blades it takes a #3 for the correct action. Having tried both 2's and 4's on the same configuration, it happened to be #3's that carried the day.

This is something few people take into consideration and is a great point to consider.

00213.jpg

We pay close attention to this detail on all of our blanks. Note the blades with the R&B logo all have precise placement on the hole for your clevis compared to the standard Lakeland Cascade which is the fluted blades in the picture. With smaller colorado's, Indiana's and cascades we use #2 clevis, especially on our Columbia anchor spinners.

On larger cascades we go to a #4 clevis simply to compensate for the pull and weight that a Big blade puts on the clevis. We have had times in field testing this where the #2 clevis have broken and the blade is lost. So this has to be a consideration when using bigger blades. In most cases an upgrade to a #3 clevis will suffice however we like the little added security of the #4 clevis

0067.jpg

Fatal Flashes have a very precise placement for the clevis hole and are an all around well made blade.


RB
 
L

LockettOutlet

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I agree with Team R&B
 
S

strawberry shortcake

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Just got in a big shipment of "B" grade wedding ring components from China. Have ordered #0 hammered Colorado blades with #2 folded Clevises (couldn't find #1) and glow in the dark beads. I use #6 baitholder hooks with the two slices in the shank to hold onto slimy worms. Can't wait to bead up a bunch of wedding ring lures. I bead them for my family and enjoy doing it so much.
 
S

strawberry shortcake

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Just about caused a heart attack when I told my boyfriend that my wedding rings had arrived in the mail! Hadn't realized it was April 1st and I was just being excited that I could start beading up my wedding ring lures. When he grabbed his chest I realized what I had said and quickly added "lures" to my announcement! Heart attack averted.
 
K

Kelkay

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ROTFLMBO...now that was a good one.
 
S

SLEDME

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Feb 17, 2011
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The Clevis size in relation to the blade is important for proper action but even more important is to match the Clevis to the shaft.Usually a french blade will still work when components are not exactly matched as opposed to a colorado style which is more prone to excessive wobble when mis matched components are used.Another very big factor in a productive spinner is the quality of the plating and the plating itself.Real silver plate is much better than nickel and real gold plating will almost always out produce brass or copper.Just a few points to consider.
 
S

strawberry shortcake

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I make lures like my dad did. Just about anything can be added to a leader, including my latest pair of broken earrings. A woman's jewelery box is a prime source for a cobbled together, mismatched wedding ring lure. I keep all my broken beaded necklaces for just that purpose. My dad used to snip off a bit of my red locks to tie up a fly, and searched through his wife's yarn basket for just the right piece of yarn to tie behind a ball. I have yet to see any clevis used with one of his blades. If he didn't have a propeller blade, he just threaded a spoon blade onto the leader through the hole. If he could steal a bead from the jewelery case, he would put that between the ball and spinner. And I still have the old bamboo pole that simply held a length of string wound around the tip.

It's a miracle I catch anything at all and could be the reason why I can't catch steelhead or salmon. But then, my dad pulled several out of the Idaho, Washington, and Oregon rivers he fished with nothing but a snip of yarn.
 

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