Best/favorite color for winter chinook

fish_4_all
We have a good season on Chinook this year on one river and I want to catch one. I have not caught one in a while and last year there were a lot of them. not many being caught legally but they were everywhere.

So what does everyone like for colors for fall chinook for spinners, corky and yarn, flies and jigs and whatever else? Oh and scent is NOT AN OPTION NOR IS BAIT for the first month so I can't even spit on the lure even though I don't chew.
 
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fishndad
you can't go wrong with pink! and depending upon water color sometimes blue and black as well! chartruese is a good color as well
 
cwsmith
i always have liked chartreuse with a peach corky best... just what i have caught the most fish on. it seems to work in a lot of situations.
 
troutdude
All black spinners. Black everything: body, blade, and tubing on hook shank. It's one of Jed Davis' designs; and it works very well. Size 3 is best in low conditions on the Siletz.
 
troutramp
fishndad said:
you can't go wrong with pink! and depending upon water color sometimes blue and black as well! chartruese is a good color as well

What water color fishes well with black and blue?
 
fish_4_all
Black and blue fish well in clear water only for spinners for me anyway. I have done okay with black and purple jigs/flies for coho in the past in stained water with the fish hitting in shallower faster water. Purple spinners work well also in bright and low water conditions. I can't say that any of these colors qwork for Chinook because I got Coho and Chum on them but who knows.
 
troutdude
The reason that I mentioned the black Jed Davis design spinners, is because they do work on Fall 'nooks. The first time that I tried them, I hooked into four nice 'nooks on the Siletz (all in the 30 - 40 pound range). It was this time of year, when water conditions were low and clear (and as I recall, a misty/cloudy morning).

Here is a partial excerpt from Jed's book "Spinner Fishing for Steelhead, Salmon, and Trout"; 2nd Edition, 1989; Frank Amato Publications:

"Yellows and Greens are very effective in water over 50 degrees. Reds and oranges are excellant choices when fishing in water below 50 degrees." "If you find yourself (however) on a stream that is low and clear, black-bladed spinners and plain tarnished brass spinners are a good choice for spooky fish".

Right now, in streams, the water level is low; and also very likely clear as well. So, dark colors are a great choice. But, when we do get the rains; then you'll want to switch tactics and the colors mentioned above.
 
fishndad
i use black and blue in early light, and dark water situations. its always worked very well for me
 
troutdude
fishndad said:
i use black and blue in early light, and dark water situations. its always worked very well for me

Those conditions also fall <pun intended>...right into Jed Davis spinner research. Generally, we should try to match the conditions. I.E. dark / stained water, low light, low water level, etc. call for a darker (and often smaller) spinner/fly/lure color. While bright sunny conditions, high water, etc. call for brighter colors.

Many peeps think that the opposite is true (like more "flash" and "shine" in "dark" conditions). All they typically wind up doing, is scaring the fish into fleeing the scene.

But, many of us have done well; when following that sort of presentational prescription (outlined above, to match the conditions).
 
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fish_4_all
SOunds like I need to make some more dark jigs and flies then. I have a few but only use them for summer run steelhead. Good thing i have plenty of jig heads to paint black and purple and lots of marabou in black and purple.
 
troutdude
Yep. I think that is a great plan. Jed Davis even says in his book that, he consistenly catches 'nooks while fishing very tiny black spinners for trout!
 
fishndad
troutdude said:
Those conditions also fall <pun intended>...right into Jed Davis spinner research. Generally, we should try to match the conditions. I.E. dark / stained water, low light, low water level, etc. call for a darker (and often smaller) spinner/fly/lure color. While bright sunny conditions, high water, etc. call for brighter colors.

Many peeps think that the opposite is true (like more "flash" and "shine" in "dark" conditions). All they typically wind up doing, is scaring the fish into fleeing the scene.

But, many of us have done well; when following that sort of presentational prescription (outlined above, to match the conditions).

lol well i had to learn without reading any books lol, guess i should get into reading more, make my journey a little shorter hahahaha.
 
troutdude
I read EVERYTHING that I can find about fishing; if it looks like it's good information. I especially enjoy perusing used book shops, for old books that are out of print. Sometimes, I find little tricks n' secrets that "old timers" used to utilize; that are now forgotten about.

It's a great way to kill time between outings; and maybe learn something useful.
 
fishndad
well, im a big fish hunter, i fish salmon, steelhead, LGB, smb, stripers, sturgeon and saltwater fish! i dont fish trout or anything smaller so i read salmon mags and things like that just not books i never have time. most everything i know is from intensive cast and retrieve what shows go's and what blows well u get the point lol. ive learned from the best anglers in the surrounding area's. but i can honestly say if i had time i would be reading up on it! sorry for the thread jack by the way lol
 
crusty old fisherman
if the water gets that dark tannic acid black to it I like gold and flo green its a killer for me year in and year out




Crusty
 
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