Baitcaster vs spinning

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todd

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for bass fishing witch do u guys like better.and witch one do u think cast farther.i can't let go of the spinning reel. i can cast really far and i dont no much about baitcasts but its a lot of money to buy one and find out the spinning was better
 
Q

qwapaw

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Use whichever you are most comfortable with. I don't think either catch a lot more fish than the other. Tight Lines, Dan
 
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todd

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everytime im at sportsmen they r pushing baitcaster sayin theres a reason people love them i just dont no
 
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cookshot

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I bought a baitcaster last year for the same reason, and thats what you see all the guys on TV using. For the type of fishing I do, spinning is a better set up I've found. The baitcaster is hard to get the hang of, and is made to take heavy line, and heavy lures and I prefer bass fishing with ultralight gear with 4 lb test. People have told me how much more accurate you can be with a baitcaster, and the only thing I can see they would be more accurate for is stopping your lure more accurately on a spot. I also don't like it because once your lure hits the water you can't let the line spool out any further without either a nasty backlash birdsnest, or pulling it out manually, and being that I primarily fish senkos, I like to let out a little extra line. The main advantage is if your fishing 20 lb line or something you don't need a huge reel I think. So if you fish heavy, maybe one is right for you, but as far as lightweight stuff, stick to your spinning reel.
 
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steelhead1

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I bought a baitcaster last year for the same reason, and thats what you see all the guys on TV using. For the type of fishing I do, spinning is a better set up I've found. The baitcaster is hard to get the hang of, and is made to take heavy line, and heavy lures and I prefer bass fishing with ultralight gear with 4 lb test. People have told me how much more accurate you can be with a baitcaster, and the only thing I can see they would be more accurate for is stopping your lure more accurately on a spot. I also don't like it because once your lure hits the water you can't let the line spool out any further without either a nasty backlash birdsnest, or pulling it out manually, and being that I primarily fish senkos, I like to let out a little extra line. The main advantage is if your fishing 20 lb line or something you don't need a huge reel I think. So if you fish heavy, maybe one is right for you, but as far as lightweight stuff, stick to your spinning reel.

x 2:)
 
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ryan808

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It totally depends on how you fish, the caster for is used to throw much faster casts and for accuracy. I like to throw jigs and with the high speed casters I have I can cast and recast to that same spot probably faster then you can bring you spinner back in, to me this is the key difference. Also regarding the distance, I think I can cast further with my casters than my spinners, it just depends on how your settings are. One note on casters is you get what you pay for, so a cheapie reel will perform like one. I very seldom get back lashes and when I do its an easy fix. Im not knocking the spinners, it totally depends on what your fishing style is.
 
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cookshot

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Mine is pretty cheap. Maybe that's why I don't use it more. I just can't afford to dish out seventy bucks for a reel. It would be nice to give a better one a go.
 
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colbypearson

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everytime im at sportsmen they r pushing baitcaster sayin theres a reason people love them i just dont no

baitcasters take practice at first and a quality one that is over 100$ is almost necissary if you want to have less hassel, the reason is bigger line more accuracy and they can handle bigger baits plus nto to mention some baits are just made for casting gear, i use baitcast over spinning more often than not but have multiple rods of both
 
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Finneus Polebender

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They definitely both have their place ,and uses . pretty much use the bait caster for the large baits spinner baits ,jigs ,swim baits and the larger artificials. No replacing a good spinning rod for the light tackle /worms and when the accuracy and hittin your target from a distance counts. when it comes to fightin big bass the baitcaster with some high test braid can't be beat !
 
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c_chickens

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my buddy got caught up in all the hype of baitcasters! its been a year since an he can throw a 3inch senko with no weight pertty good! your reel an pole will tell everything( what its used for!) figure out what type of fishn u do an match it!( cranks or plastics) most of the companys have a website!
 
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ryan808

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It takes a while to learn how to throw a lure with little weight, what helps is having a reel that handles the little weights. I have a Daiwa SOL that throws a weightless 3" with no problems, I believe another reel made for such purpose if the Shimano core.
 
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colbypearson

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It takes a while to learn how to throw a lure with little weight, what helps is having a reel that handles the little weights. I have a Daiwa SOL that throws a weightless 3" with no problems, I believe another reel made for such purpose if the Shimano core.

ya i have the daiwa fuego (the sol's brother reel pretty much) i can throw a 4" senko farther than spinning gear even with light line, i ahte fishing senkos though there are better alternatives
 
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ryan808

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:cool:Daiwa.... Same here with the casting, I can cast farther with my Sol setup than I can with a spinner.
 
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Stradic2000

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Well for one, you can run heavier line on a light weight baitcast reel. Versus a big akward 4000 Shimano spinning reel that gets heavy if you fish for more than 5 hours with non-stop casting, or if you're a tournament fisherman. For example, the Zara Spook and other 3/8-1/2oz topwaters require 12-14lb line to get the lure to work right on the surface. Also for spinnerbaits heavier than 1/4oz, you're gonna want that heavy 10-12lb line, spinning reels don't handle heavier lines as well. You wouldn't want 12lb test on a 2000 size shimano spin reel. Spinning reels cast better with limp/thin line. There's your flick of the spin cast, then you have your hard chuck you get from the baitcaster. Sometimes you need to chuck that __________ out there into the wind with a big lure, for that, you're gonna want baitcast. For finese fishing clear water, or small size ponds, you'll appreciate the *blip* landing the spinning gear gives vs. the *SPLASH* of the baitcaster.

Good rule of thumb: If you mostly use 1/4oz and lighter lures, and you don't fish heavy cover, stick with spinning gear. It's when you start using the big topwater lures when you need the baitcast reel. Or when you start getting into casting the deep diving crankbaits into tough underwater structures, rocks, weeds, etc. Are there a lot of trees along the banks from where you'll be casting?...stick with spinning reels, you can flick your lures underhanded greater distances with ease. On a light or med. light spin rod you can build up a spring bounce for the cast, to launch it out there, that's the main difference. Baitcasters need room to swing the rod in more than a 90 degree angle. You don't need to swing the rod that much with spinning gear = better for casting from confined spaces.
 
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colbypearson

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Well for one, you can run heavier line on a light weight baitcast reel. Versus a big akward 4000 Shimano spinning reel that gets heavy if you fish for more than 5 hours with non-stop casting, or if you're a tournament fisherman. For example, the Zara Spook and other 3/8-1/2oz topwaters require 12-14lb line to get the lure to work right on the surface. Also for spinnerbaits heavier than 1/4oz, you're gonna want that heavy 10-12lb line, spinning reels don't handle heavier lines as well. You wouldn't want 12lb test on a 2000 size shimano spin reel. Spinning reels cast better with limp/thin line. There's your flick of the spin cast, then you have your hard chuck you get from the baitcaster. Sometimes you need to chuck that __________ out there into the wind with a big lure, for that, you're gonna want baitcast. For finese fishing clear water, or small size ponds, you'll appreciate the *blip* landing the spinning gear gives vs. the *SPLASH* of the baitcaster.

Good rule of thumb: If you mostly use 1/4oz and lighter lures, and you don't fish heavy cover, stick with spinning gear. It's when you start using the big topwater lures when you need the baitcast reel. Or when you start getting into casting the deep diving crankbaits into tough underwater structures, rocks, weeds, etc. Are there a lot of trees along the banks from where you'll be casting?...stick with spinning reels, you can flick your lures underhanded greater distances with ease. On a light or med. light spin rod you can build up a spring bounce for the cast, to launch it out there, that's the main difference. Baitcasters need room to swing the rod in more than a 90 degree angle. You don't need to swing the rod that much with spinning gear = better for casting from confined spaces.

good points, if you get experienced enough with a baitcast setup you can hit the water very lightly just like a water droplet off a limb even with bigger baits, you eventually can (pitch) onto small diameter areas from 10-20 even 30+ feet away.-heres an example of another technique with a casting setup that bait is a 3/8 oz jig and a 5/16oz pegged chiggercraw both skip easily it takes practice and lot of it but the possibilities are for the most part neverending
 
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cookshot

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Thats with a baitcaster? Wow, impressive. Looks like an instant backlash to me, well at least in my hands. lol.
 
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colbypearson

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have u ever done that with a spining setup


ya its much easier with a spinning rod, baitcasting gear takes practice just to even learn .... to be able to skip heavy jigs and weighted plastics you fish way to much like me lol :lol: it comes in handy as you may know those spots like whoa if i could only get in there, i used to think of them as insane casts but now i can put it under about any tree i will make a new skipping vid sometime to go more in depth that is cool and hard to do but im better now and i can surely get into much tighter spots than that i would like to get it on video in the next few trips, we will see :)
 
K

kaimuki49

my comments r a tad late here but here there r from the big kahuna. when i was a kid, the ONLY reels available were conventional reels. most were larger 4-0 and up sizes intended for shore/surf fishing ulua (called jacks in fla). only the smallest conventional reels had line guides to lay the line back in even. any "real" reel was just open face with no guide - the reason was primarily that one can not cast a heavy bait very far with the line guide mechanism zipping back and forth. the terminal rig was usually an 8 oz or more lead wt with a hunk of fresh eel head as bait (that lacking, then a squid or octapus tenacle - a big pc). one had to be able to throw this out without seeing the flight of the lead and bait because we fished big game 99% at night. everything was done by feel. the person's thumb after years of weekly fishing usually had a large, thick callous on it. when i started as a kid i would wrap my thumb in a piece of scrap cloth.

eventually, spinning reels came out and in some ways transformed fishing into something readily available to the masses. spinning reels opened up the whole world of lure fishing - what we simply called "spinning". and pacific surf game fish love lures!! most big game surf fishermen never changed (to this day) from their 4-0 or 6-0 reels. some did go to large spinning reels but they are a distinct minority. and as i said, spinning with medium and small reels and poles took off. my dad would never touch a spinning reel - he never trusted its strength, durabilty, and so on, and from a practical standpoint, it is really impossible to load a spinning real with the poundage of line required (and used in a conventional reel). this is the bottom line - when it comes to casting distance, a conventional reel with heavy line will perform better than a spinner. for smaller line wts, the spinner can keep pace. we all know which is easier to use. just reminicing here. t kai
 
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