Taking the plunge...spinner making

S

Swamp Puppy

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So i have decided to take on yet another endeavor to fill the spare time i already don't have enough of. :D Decided that i would start making my own spinners.

So, i have done a bit of background research and talked to some folks and so far, this is what i have gathered.

I ordered a Boggs tacklemaker with the "B" sized head. I went with pre twisted wire with the eye loop already done. i ordered a bunch of .024" and a whole lot more .031". I don't have really any idea what actual size of wire is used for these things...so i am going on what seems to be popular choices.

The types of spinners i will be making the most of will be used to fish for Salmon while anchored up on the CR. Spinners are my go to choice when the current is running too fast to effectively run a kwik or a wobbler...so i use them a lot.

i will probably twist up a few weighted spinners for casting applications. mostly smaller trout rigs and maybe a few medium sized spinners for Salmon/Steelies in smaller rivers around the area.

There are a couple of things i am having a hard time finding info on, so hopefully someone can save me a bit of trial and error. Worst case, components for spinner making are much less expensive than my word turning hobby so trial and error will prove to be much less costly. most of the crotchety old coots on the wood turning forums would rather not speak to you until you have wittled your own lathe accessories from a tree stump with a butter knife, ground your own tools on a whetstone out of scraps of angle iron, (Photographic evidence or a trusted eyewitness are required to verify this)..and spent 10 years turning wood on your wife's old sewing machine that you converted (with your hand whittled/ground accessories and tools) into a semi functional lathe before going out and spending money on one of them new fangled jobbies that lazy folks use.

But i digress...

So, is there a guide someplace that recommends clevis sizes for various blade sizes? I will mainly be using size 5 or 6 blades in Colorado, Willow, or Indiana.

What is the preferred method for painting blades? Is a top sealant/hardener required to protect the paint or is the paint sold for these applications durable enough? I will be using pre-painted blades to start with, but will eventually look to further reduce my cost by just painting my own in the future.

When making an unweighted spinner that will be backbounced, are there any other concerns when matching components to make sure the spinner runs true? I have read the discussions here about matching weighted bodies to spinner blade sizes and will be printing that chart out to add to my reference materials. thanks to whoever posted that.

I read someplace on here about hook position in relation to the spinner blade. I believe that the general idea was that the bottom edge of the blade would be positioned at the top of the hook eye. anyone have anything they like to do differently?

what would be a good book to get? "The Bible" of spinnermaking so-to-speak.

Thanks in advance.
 
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J

Jacks Tackle

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There are not really any good books written, on these types of spinners. Bill Williamson at BC Angling does a class and that may be a great starting point for ya.

As for clevis, a #4 is a good all around size for anchor and trolling spinners. On really small stuff try going to a #2 clevis. If you are gonna put the spinner in any brackish to salt water, use a nickel finish clevis. For up river freshwater, a brass clevis will work.

You are right on with the end of the blade to hook eyelet idea.

Good luck
RB
 
G

GraphiteZen

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You will definitely have a good time making spinners! Much like fly tying, it's a blast trying to find combos that actually will produce better than other standard patters you may have already grown tired of...

A few notes;

- The 'pre-wrapped' type wire -
You referred to it as a pre wrapped 'eye' so I'm assuming this means you truly consider it to be the eye end of the wire. I have always considered the eye to be an effective place to put a split-O ring where you then attach the hook for it is a lot easier to do the final wrap with the spinner blade the closest thing getting in your way as opposed to treble hook! Additionally, not wrapping the wire in such a way to permanently attach the hook to the spinner allows you actually change a bent/dull/rusty hook without having to destroy the entire spinner.

- The eye end -
I have found it to be worth the time and money to wrap a quality swivel into the eye loop of the shaft. Especially if you are running excessively large blades. To me it's well worth it because, so long as you have used an adequate swivel (I have found that the Japanese ball bearing types are needed for larger salmon spinners), you have completely removed line twist from the equation. Also, attaching the swivel to each individual spinner forces you to tie and retie your knots which lessens the chance of breaking off due to an old knot you neglected to retie (if you prefer to use a clasp swivel).

- Wire Size -

The only thing you have to worry about with wire size is whether or not you can get the clevis you have chosen as a match to your blade actually around the diameter of the wire. Even if you used relatively small wire for the size of blade and hook there's no way it's going to break before your line! The only that will happen is it will bend easier. However, if you chose wire that was far too small for the inside bore of the clevis you are using I suppose you could upset how the blade spins but I don't thing that is very likely. With all that said it's probably still best to match the wire to the clevis as well as you can.

- Wire Length -

I have always tried to keep them as short as possible. My opinion is that any excess length which isn't covered by the spinner or body material just detracts from the natural appeal and results in a lure which will deform with a lot less abuse. But make sure you have enough room for the clevis to spin without it getting pinned during fluttering and what-not.

- Clevis/Blade -

When you chose a clevis and blade, make sure to blade can spin without the inside tip (the small section that is between the clevis and wire) touching the wire when the blade is 90 degrees or completely perpendicular to the wire. As far as actual numbers for size, I don't have that reference around, but I would bet you could chose a number for a blade and that same number for clevis and get it pretty close but again, I'm not sure of this. Perhaps choosing a clevis size one number greater than blade.

- Blade -

Kodiak has a lot of experience painting blades and can help you out. I have none.

Have fun!! :dance:
 
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S

Swamp Puppy

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Thanks for the info all! I love all the experimenting that comes with making your own gear to hunt/fish with. It certainly does help when others can pitch in a little conventional wisdom to kick me in the right direction though.

GZ - i like the idea of putting a split ring on the pre-twisted "eye" end for the hook. I Think i will definitely go that route.

Jack - hadn't considered the possibility of different metals for different water conditions. thanks for kicking my brain into second gear.

I already have some stuff on the way to mess around with. I decided that sooner or later i was going to need to just get some of this stuff in hand and see what is what.

Kodiak - PM will be on the way shortly. Remember, i make calls....which is it's own dark path. so, i am already not quite right. lol. in fact, waterfowling in general requires a person to be not right. who the heck would be excited to get up at 3m hoping for the worst possible weather conditions and go sit in the mud and stare at the sky?

Troutdude - thanks for the link
 
troutdude

troutdude

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You're quite welcome, for the "Bible link".

One more link to add, for Jed Davis style components @ Don Green's Fishermans Shack (between Corvallis & Monmouth):

Top Sellers

Don is a G. Loomis retailer too. Also a friendly and honest guy, filled with lots of fishing knowledge.
 
J

Jacks Tackle

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also you can try rvrfshr, BC angling, Stamina, Pen Tac and fishermans corner.

RB
 
Troutski

Troutski

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Run like the wind my friend...

Run like the wind my friend...

Jann's Netcraft had this handy little sizing guide on their site. It was pretty useful. Make sure your viewer is set to 100% though or the actual sizes won't be accurate.

Fishing Hook Size Chart

Man my heart goes out to you.......you have entered a world of crazy experimenting and trial and error. Not to mention the massive drain on your wallet, run my friend; run like the wind. Once the swirling vortex grabs a hold of you....you are doomed:lol:
I love making my own stuff, this last Sat. I hooked a very bright Steelhead on one of my own creations. Very satisfying to say the least, every one has there own ideas of the whys and hows of spinner making...experiment and think out side the box so to speak. Try new and different things and paints...I prefer Florescent paints...but this is just my opinion. Best of luck and enjoy your new hobby...

Chuck
 
S

Swamp Puppy

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Troutski - Thanks! my wallet already has a drain. ASIDE from my ex-wife. lol. I have been into making my own duck calls as well as various other wood turning projects for about 2 years now. i never seem to have enough or enough different types of wood on hand (i estimate i probably have over 100lbs of turning blanks currently). everytime i see a cool looking chunk...the UPS man brings it to my house. amazing thing, the internet. lol.

I am already a fan of a few of the sites mentioned above....the UPS man will be beating a path to my door here soon. I expect i'll be seeing him roughly once a day for about a week straight at least. lol.

you are right about accomplishments in the field that are derrived from your own work. for some reason, ducks seem to respond to a call i made myself just a bit better than anything i could buy in a store. I am hoping to get the same success with this hobby as well.
 
G

GraphiteZen

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you are right about accomplishments in the field that are derrived from your own work. for some reason, ducks seem to respond to a call i made myself just a bit better than anything i could buy in a store. I am hoping to get the same success with this hobby as well.

Nice.... Honestly, I feel some of that also has to do with ones own confidence in a tool they have manufactured themselves. I tend to put a little more heart into the use of a particular item I have made myself, as opposed to something that's cheaply made to begin with and was sitting in the 'sale' bin at Bi-Mart. Granted the quality of a preferred product breaks down to the individual sportsman himself but with a self made piece it's all those extra little touches in the detail along with the pride of using something you made yourself that really sets them apart! Simply put, I feel I try harder when using my own stuff. I love it. Congratulation on your new hobby!
 
Troutski

Troutski

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Homemade....just like Moms homemade Pies

Homemade....just like Moms homemade Pies

Nice.... Honestly, I feel some of that also has to do with ones own confidence in a tool they have manufactured themselves. I tend to put a little more heart into the use of a particular item I have made myself, as opposed to something that's cheaply made to begin with and was sitting in the 'sale' bin at Bi-Mart. Granted the quality of a preferred product breaks down to the individual sportsman himself but with a self made piece it's all those extra little touches in the detail along with the pride of using something you made yourself that really sets them apart! Simply put, I feel I try harder when using my own stuff. I love it. Congratulation on your new hobby!

Nicely said.:clap:...wonderful experience:D.

Chuck
 

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