SW Washington Fishing Report

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The Guides Forecast

The Guides Forecast

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Tributary fishing slows even further, summer Chinook and steelhead fair in the Columbia. High country trout fishery heating up as lowland lakes trout slows.

Fishing in the local tributaries is very slow, with spring Chinook catches declining, and very few summer steelhead coming in. The Columbia offers better ops for Chinook, steelhead, and shad, with the best action coming up near Bonneville Dam and the Camas area. Sturgeon are biting a little better, too.

Local lakes trout fishing is wrapping up, while high elevation lakes are now accessible, and offer better chances for success. Warm water fishing is excellent anywhere there are fish, including the many lakes along Highway 14 in the Gorge.

It looks like another great year for shad, with catches picking up throughout the Columbia.

Next weekend is free fishing weekend in Washington, and anglers can fish Washington waters without having to purchase a fishing license on June 12 and 13. However, all other rules and regulations apply

Lewis and Washougal Rivers Fishing Report—Not much to report in the Lewis, as fishing participation is really declining due to a lack of fish. Only one bank angler was surveyed in the last creel survey, and he had no catch. River conditions have been good, but with Chinook closed and the steelhead a no-show so far, anglers have little to target in the river.

The Washougal has recovered from its low water issues after the recent heavy rains, but is once again on the drop. Here, as in the Lewis, there have been no good reports.

Merwin and Yale Lakes Fishing Report—kokanee anglers are finding conditions to be a bit more stable in both lakes, although the high sun has pushed them deeper, according to John Thompson of Sportsman’s Warehouse in Vancouver, (360) 604-8000). Most anglers are using divers or downriggers to reach the fish in 40 to 60 feet of water, and fishing hootchies or other lures tipped with corn fished behind a dodger or flasher.

Longview Area

Cowlitz and Kalama Rivers Fishing Report—
Steelheading in the Cowlitz is still slow, although a few summer steelhead are biting. Fishing pressure has dropped quite a bit, too. During the latest creel surveys above the I-5 Bridge, seven bank rods had no catch, while five boats/17 rods kept two steelhead and released one steelhead. Last week, Tacoma Power employees recovered 110 spring Chinook adults, 64 spring Chinook jacks, 10 summer-run steelhead adults, and six winter-run steelhead adults during five days of operations at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery separator.

Upper river anglers are bobber-dogging with bait for the fish, while bank anglers are using a variety of methods.

Lower river anglers are finding a few fish, but not many. In fact, creel surveys below the I-5 Bridge found 23 bank rods with no catch, and one boat/one rod had no catch.

Fishing has slowed for spring Chinook on the Kalama, although river conditions are improving following the rains. Thompson of Sportsman’s Warehouse has heard reports of a few summer steelhead being caught in the river. Both the steelhead and Chinook seem to be spread through the river, with some of the best bites coming from the mid-river drifts.

Local Lakes Fishing Report—Mayfield Lake rainbows are biting well, as are the lake’s tiger muskies. Mineral Lake is also fishing very well for rainbows. Swofford Pond and Silver Lake are both good for largemouth bass, and Silver is still giving up nice crappie.

Columbia River Gorge

Drano Lake and Wind River Fishing Report—
Fishing has slowed down in Drano Lake, and the pressure has lifted a little. During the latest creel survey, four bank rods had no catch, while 18 boats/29 rods kept three Chinook and released two Chinook.

The Wind River is giving up a few spring Chinook as well, with the latest creel survey showing that seven bank rods had no catch, while 10 boats/18 rods kept three Chinook and released one Chinook.

Local Lakes Fishing Report—Goose Lake has been well-stocked with rainbows and cutthroats and has produced excellent fishing. Rowland Lake is still fishing well for trout, and there are bluegill and largemouth biting as well.

Terry Otto’s story about Columbia Gorge walleye in the Columbian Newspaper can be found HERE.
 
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The Guides Forecast

The Guides Forecast

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Ocean salmon has been slowed by hot weather, but should be improving this week. Shad fishing is excellent at Bonneville, while Chinook and sockeye are fair in the lower Columbia. Tributary steeleheading is picking up.

Vancouver Metro Area

The record-breaking heat last weekend kept many anglers at home, but most that ventured forth did find decent fishing. Chinook are biting in the lower Columbia, although the Vancouver area was not as good as the lower river. Sockeye, steelhead, and Chinook are being caught by plunkers in the lower river, while John Thompson of Sportsman’s Warehouse in Vancouver, (360) 604-8000), reports that the shad darts are flying off the shelves.

Trout fishing slowed everywhere with the heat, and even the warm water species slowed. Salmon fishing opened on the 27th off the coast, and warm water hampered that bite. Ocean fishing should pick up now that the temps have stabilized.

Lewis and Washougal Rivers Fishing report— The Lewis was running at about 11.5 feet over the past week, and river conditions are good. According to Thompson, a few anglers chasing summer steelhead on the Lewis are finding a few fish, and bobber and eggs seems to be the go-to method. While certainly not good, the fishing is decent. Anglers are finding some fish between the hatchery and the Lewis River Golf Course, and a few fish have been taken by anglers plunking in the lower river. Bank anglers at the hatchery are getting just a few fish as well, also on bobber and eggs. With the Columbia fishing as good as it is anglers are not fishing the Lewis very much.

The Washougal was already running low before the heat wave hit, and it is even lower now. There is not much going on in this little river, and there are very few anglers giving it a try. Low, warm water is keeping the few fish from being in the mood to take a bait.

Merwin and Yale Lakes Fishing report—Fishing is described as fair to good in both lakes by Stacie Kelsey of the WDFW Inland Fished Program, although Thompson reports you can almost walk across the lake on the boats fishing Merwin. The hot weather and sun drove the schools of kokanee to seek the cooler temps in deeper water. Most of the anglers doing well are targeting the kokanee in 40 feet of water or deeper. Anglers working shallow are not doing well at all.

Local Lakes Fishing report—Lowland lakes trout fishing has slowed to almost nothing, although fresh trout plantings were made in June at Klineline Pond. It could remain slow the rest of the summer. Cooling temps might make for a better warm-water bite in Lacamas and Vancouver Lakes, where panfish and bass await. Fish the early morning and late evenings for the best bite. Good-sized rainbow trout are coming to hand in Swift Reservoir, especially where the Lewis River enters the lake.

Longview Area

Cowlitz and Kalama Rivers Fishing Report—
Summer steelhead fishing has improved on the Cowlitz, and anglers are getting good numbers of fish. Most of the action is taking place up by the Blue Creek area. Dave Mallahan of Dave’s Guide Service (360-201-9313), fished the reach early this week, and he had two summer steelhead in the box by 9 am. He reports the fishing is pretty decent, unless there are too many boats on the river. He took his fish by bobber-dogging salmon eggs, a bait which he said has been the most effective. Most boat anglers are bobber-dogging, which is proving the most effective way to target Cowlitz steelhead.

The river has now reverted to permanent rules, so anglers may keep fin-clipped spring Chinook. In the most recent creel survey above the I-5 Bridge, 19 bank anglers kept one Chinook and one jack, while boat anglers scored almost a fish a rod, with 20 boats/76 rods keeping 64 steelhead.

The Kalama River has been fishing a little slower, although a few spring Chinook can still be found, and a few summer steelhead are getting around. However, the steelhead have been slow to show up, and they haven’t been holding well in the lower sections of the river. Some anglers have had limited success in the very lowest sections of the river below the Modrow Bridge, though, and a few steelhead have been taken up in the Canyon, but fishing overall is slow. Bait has been the go-to offering, including sand shrimp, salmon eggs, and coon tail shrimp, all fished below a bobber.

You can read Terry Otto’s recent article on ocean salmon fishing off Long Beach in the Columbian Newspaper HERE.
 
The Guides Forecast

The Guides Forecast

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By Terry Otto

Summer Chinook, sockeye, and steelhead fair in the Columbia, while shad still strong. Ocean salmon improving, but for smallish fish. Trout fair to good in highland lakes, while steelhead showing well in Cowlitz.

Vancouver Metro area

Salmon and steelhead are biting well in the lower Columbia, but catches near Vancouver remain fair at best. It’s also fair at best up near Bonneville, but anglers up there continue to have a ball with the sizable shad run.

Tributary steelhead fishing is good in the Cowlitz, okay in the North Fork, but poor elsewhere.

High country trout are still biting early and late in the day. Panfish and bass have picked up after the hot weather passed in most local lakes and waters.

Lewis and Washougal Rivers Fishing report—Steelhead are showing in better numbers in the North Fork Lewis, where the latest creel found three boats/five rods keeping two steelhead. According to John Thompson of Sportsman’s Warehouse in Vancouver, (360) 604-8000), there are steelhead being caught in the river, but not anywhere near as many as normal.

The Washougal remains low and fishing is still poor, and very few anglers are trying the little river. A good freshet is unlikely anytime soon, but it is what is needed to improve the fishing.

Merwin and Yale Lakes Fishing Report– Fishing is described as fair to good in both lakes by Stacie Kelsey of the WDFW Inland Fished Program, although Thompson reports that competition is fierce at Merwin. The hot weather has passed, but sunny days are seeing a good bite in early morning and late day only. Most of the anglers doing well are targeting the kokanee in 40 feet of water or deeper.

Longview Area

Cowlitz and Kalama Rivers Fishing Report
— Last week, Tacoma Power employees recovered 269 spring Chinook adults, 46 spring Chinook jacks, 95 spring Chinook mini jacks, 93 summer-run steelhead adults, and one cutthroat trout during five days of operations at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery separator. In addition, Tacoma Power recycled 92 summer-run steelhead adults to the I-5 boat launch Anglers are reminded that the river has reverted to permanent rules, and fishers may now retain fin-clipped spring Chinook.

Fishing is best in the upper river below the Blue Creek. During the latest creel above the I-5 Bridge, 20 bank rods kept six steelhead, indicating an improved bite for bank anglers. 15 boats/50 rods kept one Chinook and 40 steelhead.

The Kalama River is giving up a few summer steelhead in the river’s lower sections, according to Thompson. There has been a good bite on pulling plugs, with the U-20 Flatfish reportedly drawing bites in red.

Columbia River Gorge

Klickitat River Fishing Report—
The river is still off-color, according to Carl Coolidge of the Klickitat Canyon Market, (509-369-4400). He said the river turned brown, “like rolling mud,” following the record heat wave. The river is now a gray color with about 6 inches visibility. Very few anglers have given the river a try, although summer steelhead should now be entering the river in decent numbers.

Goose Lake is fishing well early and late in the day for trout, and other high country lakes are providing a good trout bite.

More on our site - https://www.theguidesforecast.com/free-oregon-fishing-reports/
 
The Guides Forecast

The Guides Forecast

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Summer Steelhead photo by Terry Otto

Summer Steelhead photo by Terry Otto

Terry Otto Reporting: Chinook and Shad dropping off, but sockeye and steelhead still biting. Summer steelhead good in the Cowlitz, while high country trout fishing is fair. Walleye are not biting well on the Washougal Reef, but are doing great at the John Day Dam.

Vancouver Metro Area
Summer Chinook are tapering off and the shad run is over. Summer steelhead and sockeye are still being caught in the lower Columbia, but catch rates near Vancouver are still low. Local trout lakes are very slow, while panfish are actively biting in most local waters.

Sockeye numbers over Bonneville are still strong, although popular sockeye areas above and below Bonneville are only fishing fair.

Lewis and Washougal Rivers Fishing Report—Jhon Thompson of John Thompson of Sportsman’s Warehouse in Vancouver, (360) 604-8000), reports that spring Chinook are showing up in the Lewis River, much later than usual, while steelheading is still slow. Fishing pressure is low on the river, perhaps because other fisheries are doing pretty well. Only two bank anglers were surveyed in the latest creel, and they had no catch. Whether fishing for springers or summer steelhead, bait has been the most effective, with salmon eggs, sand shrimp, and coon shrimp drawing bites.

The river has good flow, but is very clear, and anglers fishing with lighter lines have an advantage. The action is taking place between the Hole in the Wall in Woodland and the hatchery. Boat anglers have done best upriver of the Golf Course, while bank anglers are targeting the hatchery itself. A few springers have been taken in the Meat Hole.

The Washougal remains extremely low, and the fishing has been poor. There is little to no fishing pressure here, and local anglers seem to be awaiting the fall fisheries.

Merwin and Yale Lakes Fishing Report– Fishing is still described as fair to good in both lakes by Stacie Kelsey of the WDFW Inland Fished Program, and the competition is fierce at Merwin. Sunny days are seeing a good bite in early morning and late day, and the schools can be found near the 20-foot mark early, and dropping down as deep as 60 feet when the sun climbs mid-day.

Local Lakes Fishing Report—The Swift Power Canal has been fishing very well for rainbow trout, as has the Swift reservoir, especially where the Lewis River enters the lake. Lacamas Lake is good for panfish and bass, as is Vancouver Lake. Be warned, Vancouver Lake is prone to algae blooms, and they occur every summer. Stay out of the water if the blooms are visible, or there are warning signs posted. Keep pets out of the water, too.

Longview Area
Cowlitz and Kalama Rivers Fishing Report–
Last week, Tacoma Power employees recovered 158 spring Chinook adults, 48 spring Chinook jacks, 446 spring Chinook mini jacks, 107 summer-run steelhead adults, and six cutthroat trout during four days of operations at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery separator. In addition, Tacoma Power recycled 40 summer-run steelhead adults to the I-5 boat launch.

The Barrier Dam spillway project is under way through October 1. The river will be held at about the 2,500 cfs level as the work continues.

Summer steelhead fishing is pretty good in the Cowlitz, and the lower river produced some better catches this week, too. Below the I-5 Bridge 41 surveyed bank anglers kept seven steelhead. Many of the fish caught were taken by plunking. The bite was still better above the bridge, where 29 bank rods kept three steelhead, and 25 boats/80 rods kept 44 steelhead. The river is also giving up fair numbers of spring Chinook, as the run has continued to come in, much later than usual. According to Dave Mallahan of Dave’s Guide Service (360-201-9313), the fishing for summer fish should continue to improve over the next couple weeks, and the best bite will come for fishers that are bobber-dogging with bait or beads.

The Kalama is fishing slow for summer steelhead and spring Chinook. The fishing pressure has dropped off, too, with less anglers clogging the mid-river fishing holes. During the last creel survey only two anglers were checked, and they had no catch. There are some summer steelhead around, and they are keyed in on bait and plugs right now.

Columbia River Gorge
Local Lakes Fishing Report
—panfish are biting well in Rowland Lake, tunnel Lake, and all of the Highway 14 causeway lakes. Smallmouth bass will also be biting in these waters. Goose Lake is fishing fair for trout, and the best bet is early morning. Spring Creek in Klickitat County has been good for trout.

Get more fishing information on our site The Guide's Forecast
 
The Guides Forecast

The Guides Forecast

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By Terry Otto

Ocean coho is the best bet for the coming week, with all Columbia fisheries slowing. Tributaries fishing slow, while high country trout good. Panfish great everywhere.

Vancouver Metro Area
Chinook, sockeye, and steelhead are all slowing in the Columbia, and mark rates are poor for the Chinook and steelhead. Fishing the Columbia in the immediate Vancouver area has been slow. With shad over, too, boat anglers will want to head to the salt for the best action this week by fishing for ocean coho off Long Beach.

High country trout lakes are picking up, with many of them fishing really good right now. The only thing biting better than the trout are the mosquitos.

Lewis and Washougal Rivers Fishing report—There is not too much going on in the Lewis River, with only a very few steelhead coming to hand. Fishing pressure did pick up recently, but anglers have been mostly disappointed. John Thompson of Sportsman’s Warehouse in Vancouver, (360) 604-8000), has heard sporadic reports of steelhead coming to hand, but those have been very few and far between. During the latest creel survey, 36 bank rods had no catch, while. six boats/10 rods kept one steelhead. Conditions in the river are good, with the river running at about the 10.2-foot stage.

The Washougal remains very low and ultra-clear, and there have been no recent reports from steelheaders. If anyone is actually fishing the river, they are keeping quiet. However, given the conditions and the poor returns of summer steelhead elsewhere, savvy anglers are fishing elsewhere.

Merwin and Yale Lakes Fishing Report-– Fishing is still described as fair to good in both lakes by a number of sources, and the competition is still very high at Merwin. Sunny days are seeing a good bite in early morning and late day, and the schools can be found near the 20-foot mark early, and dropping down as deep as 60 feet when the sun climbs mid-day.

Local Lakes Fishing Report—There is a very good catfish bite going on in Vancouver Lake, but anglers should be aware of the possibility of blue-green algae blooms, especially with warmer weather forecast for this weekend. Keep pets and yourself out of the water if the warning signs are posted, but the fish are supposed to be safe to eat. Lacamas Lake is fishing well for yellow perch and largemouth bass.

Cowlitz and Kalama Rivers Fishing Report–The Barrier Dam spillway upgrade construction project is taking place through Oct. 1. Please note that the Cowlitz River outflows will be capped at 2,500 cfs for approximately three weeks in July to accommodate the requirements of the project.

Fishing slowed a little this past week on the Cowlitz River, although it is still fishing better for steelhead than any other Columbia River tributary.

The Kalama is still fishing slow for summer steelhead. During the last creel survey 19 bank rods had no catch. The summer steelhead that are around are keyed in on bait and plugs right now.

Check out Terry’s detailed report (he crushes it every week!) and forecast in this week’s paid version for SW Washington Members!
 
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The Guides Forecast

The Guides Forecast

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by Terry Otto

Ocean coho is still the best bet for the coming week, with Buoy Ten on the horizon. Cowlitz fair for steelhead, all other tribs slow, slow, slow. Bass, walleye, and panfish excellent.

Vancouver Metro Area
Columbia River Fishing is in a short lull, as anglers gear up for Buoy Ten, and most tributaries are fishing slow for summer steelhead. The only exception is the Cowlitz, but even that fishery has slowed down some.

High country trout fisheries are a mixed bag, with some doing well, but others not so much. Panfish, bass, and walleye are all still biting really well just about everywhere, and could be the best bet for action until those fall fish arrive. There are a few really good catfish bites happening, too.

Lewis and Washougal Rivers Fishing report—There is just not much biting in the Lewis River, with only a very few steelhead coming to hand. Fishing pressure is up a bit, but anglers have been mostly disappointed. John Thompson of Sportsman’s Warehouse in Vancouver, (360) 604-8000), said a few summer fish were around, but no one would call this fishery hot, or even fair. During the latest creel survey, 12 bank rods kept one steelhead and released one steelhead. Four boats/five rods released one Chinook.

Pulling plugs and fishing bait or jigs below a bobber has been responsible for a few of the landings, but with so few fish coming to hand, it is hard to find a pattern. The best bet for boats.

Longview Area

Cowlitz and Kalama Rivers Fishing Report–
The Barrier Dam spillway upgrade construction project has finished. The Cowlitz River outflows below Mayfield Dam were at about 2,500 cfs for the last few weeks due to the construction, but the project is now at a phase where flows can be increased again and move back to typical operations. The flows will likely increase to 3,500 cfs on Wednesday, but it’s probable that discharge may go as high as 6,400 cfs and be there through Friday. Please note that the construction work has changed the flow path near the “Cowlitz River Below Mayfield Dam” USGS gage, so the real-time gage readings are currently not accurate.

Fishing was still slow on the Cowlitz this past week, although it is fishing better for summer steelhead than any other Columbia tributary. Fishing was best again in the upper river. During the latest creel survey below the I-5 Bridge, 22 bank rods kept two steelhead. 1 boat/2 rods kept one steelhead. Above the I-5 Bridge 13 bank rods kept two steelhead and one cutthroat. 21 boats/73 rods kept 36 steelhead. You still can’t beat bobber-dogging with bait, and that is what most boat anglers are doing, while bank anglers are fishing drifted gear and bobber presentations. Last week, Tacoma Power employees recovered 302 spring Chinook adults, 48 spring Chinook jacks, 216 spring Chinook mini jacks, 217 summer-run steelhead adults, and 10 cutthroat trout during five days of operations at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery separator.

Also, Tacoma Power recycled 103 summer-run steelhead adults to the I-5 boat launch.

The Kalama is still fishing slow for summer steelhead, although Thompson reports a few are being caught in the lower river. Fishing pressure is still low, too. During the last creel survey 13 bank rods had no catch. The summer steelhead that are around are keyed in on bait and plugs right now. In the low water the fish are moving through the system slowly, and the best bite has been below the Modrow Bridge.

Merwin and Yale Lakes Fishing Report—According to multiple sources, the kokanee fishing at Merwin has been tough lately, even though effort has not seemingly decreased at all. Sunny days are seeing a decent bite in early morning and late day, with the schools at the 20-foot mark early and dropping down as deep as 60 feet when the sun climbs mid-day.

Anglers have been the reach from the Golf course up to the hatchery, while bank anglers are fishing at the hatchery and down in Woodland at the Hole in the Wall.

The Washougal remains very low and ultra-clear, and there have been no recent reports from steelheaders. The fish collection weir has been installed, but locals say the river is prohibitively low and clear.

Columbia River Gorge

Drano Lake Fishing Report—
A few Chinook are starting to show up in the catch, and fishing can be described as decent. Anglers are reminded that fishing for, and retaining steelhead is prohibited. During the latest creel survey, six boats/16 rods kept six Chinook and released one Chinook and one steelhead.


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The Guides Forecast

The Guides Forecast

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by Terry Otto

Buoy Ten off to a good start, ocean coho still good but the schools are out in deeper water. Tribs still slow, trout fair, panfish and bass excellent.

Vancouver Metro Area
Good tides produced a better than usual bite for the opening of Buoy 10, while ocean salmon has been plagued by warm waters near shore. The schools of bait fish have moved off the shore to find cooler water, and the salmon have followed.

The Columbia is fair for steelhead, although catches are still poor in the Vancouver area, and the mark rate has been disappointing. Most warm water fisheries are still kicking, except that the Camas Reef has been poor for walleye.

Lewis and Washougal Rivers Fishing Report—No changes here for either river. The Lewis continues to fish poor to fair for summer steelhead, with the latest creel surveys finding 10 bank rods with no catch, while three boats/ six rods kept one steelhead. Pressure is light to fair.

The fish are hard to pattern, because there are so few in the system, but bait and plugs have taken a few fish.

The Washougal is still too prohibitively low, clear, and warm for any kind of decent fishing, and there is still little to no fishing pressure.

Merwin and Yale Lakes Fishing Report—Both lakes are rated as fair to good by the WDFW and multiple sources. Anglers are finding the schools by fishing 20 to 60 feet deep with kokanee flashers and hoochies tipped with corn.

Longview Area

Cowlitz and Kalama Rivers Fishing Report—
When the most recent work on the Barrier Dam outflow was completed, the river was raised to almost 8,000 CFS. That pulled a burst of summer steelhead into the upper river and made fishing very good for a few days, according to Dave Mallahan of Dave’s Guide Service (360-201-9313). He reportedly was doing very well until they dropped the water, and since then he has struggled to get one or two fish a day. Above the I-5 Bridge in the last creel survey 11 bank rods kept one steelhead. 24 boats/77 rods kept 33 steelhead and released one jack and one steelhead. These catch rates are lower than has been the case over the last month or so, and reflect the lower river flows that are happening right now.

Anglers are reminded that the USGS hydro for the Mayfield Dam has been rendered inaccurate due to the changes in flow caused by the work at the dam.

Mallahan got his fish by bobber-dogging in the first few miles below Blue Creek. Bobber-dogging has been the most consistent method for both summer and winter steelhead, and if you are not doing that, you are not likely to do as well as the anglers that are. Salmon eggs have been the favorite, but sand shrimp, coon tail shrimp, and beads can all be effective at times.

Reports for the Kalama River still show very few summer steelhead coming to hand. During the latest creel survey, 12 bank rods kept one steelhead and released one steelhead.

Columbia River Gorge

Drano Lake Fishing Report—
Anglers are finding a few Chinook, and in the latest creel survey, four bank rods kept one Chinook. Eight boats/15 rods kept two Chinook and released one Chinook, one jack and 11 steelhead. Anglers are reminded that steelhead are off-limits. With fishing already fair, the lake may be looking at a good fall season. Numbers should climb over the next few weeks, and fishing should improve.

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The Guides Forecast

The Guides Forecast

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Salmon still biting in the ocean, but high-water temps are an issue. Buoy 10 off to a good start, with better tides next week, and a few Chinook showing in Vancouver-area hog lines on the Columbia River.

Vancouver Metro Area
A few early Chinook are being taken in Vancouver area hog lines, with most falling for wobblers fished on anchor, but the small bite is off and on. Some days the fish show, and others they don’t. Wait a couple weeks, and the bite will improve greatly. The local tribs are still fishing very slow for steelhead, while anglers await better times with the coming fall fish.

High country trout lakes are only fair at best, and have slowed down in recent weeks, while warm water fisheries are excellent everywhere. Catfish, bass and panfish are biting well in lakes and the Columbia, with the only slow spot being Washougal Reef walleye.

Lewis and Washougal Rivers Fishing Report—It is starting to sound like a broken record, but the Lewis is still fishing very slow for steelhead, and there are very few anglers giving it a whirl. With so few steelhead in the river a pattern is hard to develop, and right now anglers have as good a chance of stumbling onto an early fall salmon as they do a summer steelhead. During the latest WDFW creel survey, 15 bank rods had no catch, while three boats/six rods kept only one steelhead. With patterns hard to develop, anglers are fishing bobbers with eggs, jigs, or beads, and pulling plugs near the town of Woodland, and from the golf course up to the hatchery. Bank fishing has been mostly at the hatchery and the Hole in the Wall.

No changes in the Washougal, with the water still low and dangerously warm. There are few, if any, fish in the system, and fewer anglers trying for them. If there have been any recent catches, or if anyone has established a pattern, they are keeping quiet. But, river conditions are not conducive.

Merwin and Yale Lakes Fishing Report—Both lakes are fishing fair to good for kokanee, and the most successful anglers are fishing from 20 to 60 feet of water, trolling kokanee flashers and hootchies tipped with corn. However, at times the bite has been inconsistent, and the fish hard to pattern. That has been the case this entire season, and some anglers believe the incessant pressure from the fishing fleet may be driving the kokes to act skittishly. Anglers are finding the schools fairly high in the water column until the sun rises, and then they are moving deeper.

Longview Area
Cowlitz and Kalama Rivers Fishing Report—
The summer steelhead action has slowed in the Cowlitz River, but it is still the best bet for summer fish. Catches have been dropping ever since the water was raised a couple weeks ago, and then dropped. The best bite has been for angler’s bobber-dogging the first few miles below Blue Creek. Bank anglers continue to fish drifted gear or bobber presentations near the mouth of the creek.

Last week, Tacoma Power employees recovered 66 spring Chinook adults, 11 spring Chinook jacks, 96 spring Chinook mini jacks, 58 summer-run steelhead adults, and 25 cutthroat trout during five days of operations at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery separator.

The Kalama is fishing terribly slow, and the latest creel had five anglers with no catch. The river is now low and clear, and the weir is in place just below the Modrow Bridge. Few fresh fish will pass the weir until high water makes it possible. A few salmon could be entering the lower river soon, but with the flows so low, they will probably not move up the river far, and there have not been any salmon recorded yet.

Columbia River Gorge

Drano Lake Fishing Report
—Fishing slowed just a little at Drano this week. The latest creel survey found three bank rods releasing one steelhead. 29 boats/66 rods kept eight Chinook, two jacks and released seven steelhead. Trolling with 360 flashers has been the go-to method. No report as yet on the best baits. Bonneville Dam counts are rising, so the lake should start to fish better in a week or two. Remember that steelhead are off-limits this year in Drano and the Wind River.

The Guide's Forecast's full report this week
 
The Guides Forecast

The Guides Forecast

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df6083d3-eb36-9ae6-e36c-66aebf430ce1.jpg


Chinook photo by Terry Otto

SW Washington Fishing Report​

Buoy 10 is heating up, and a few Chinook are showing in the Vancouver Area hog lines. Tributaries remain slow, but the fall fish are on the way.

Vancouver Metro Area

A few fall Chinook have been taken in local hog lines near Vancouver, although we are still a week or two from the real numbers. On some days the fish show, and on others they don’t. The tributaries are still slow, but there have been a few reports of fresh salmon, and the first good catches are on the way Chinook photo by Terry Otto
.
Warm water fisheries are hot everywhere, but the walleye bite on the Washougal Reef is still slow. Catfish, bass, and panfish are biting well just about everywhere, according to Stacie Kelsey of the WDFW Inland Fished Program. She also reports that high-country trout fishing is beginning to improve.

Lewis and Washougal Rivers Fishing Report—It’s still slow fishing on the Lewis River, but there have been reports of a few salmon being caught already. We are still a week or two away from the better fishing, but with a few Chinook showing in the Columbia already, the first good catches should come fairly soon. Steelhead angling is still very slow, and the most recent WDFW survey found 11 bank rods with no catch, while six boats/13 rods kept one steelhead.

The Washougal River is still low and clear, and the WDFW has installed the fish weir. There will probably not be much to fish for here until the first of the Chinook enter the river.

Merwin and Yale Lakes Fishing Report—According to Kelsey, the fishing at Merwin picked up some this week. The fish are still in the same patterns, from 20 to 60 feet deep, but they have been holding a little higher in the water column on the cloudy days. The schools have been a little more consistent this week, and more anglers are doing well.

Longview Area

Cowlitz and Kalama Rivers Fishing Report—
Fishing for steelhead in the upper river continues to slow down, and there have been few reports of any salmon being caught as of yet. Fishing pressure has been less, probably as most boats are out fishing Buoy Ten. Last week, Tacoma Power employees recovered 108 summer-run steelhead adults, 56 spring Chinook adults, six spring Chinook jacks, 143 spring Chinook mini jacks, 25 cutthroat trout, eight fall Chinook adults, and one fall Chinook jack during five days of operations at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery separator.

The lower river fishing is still slow, but a few fish have been caught by anglers plunking. Anglers are reminded that the river is closed to steelhead below the Lexington Bridge to protect summer steelhead bound for Idaho that enter the river to escape warm temps in the Columbia.
Chinook anglers have started fishing the mouth of the river, but just a few have been taken so far.

The Kalama is fishing very slow for the poor summer steelhead run, and anglers are looking for the first salmon of the year in the lower river.

Columbia River Gorge

Drano Lake Fishing Report
—A few thousand fall Chinook have crossed over Bonneville, and that should improve the fishing in Drano. During the last creel survey, four bank rods had no catch, while 25 boats/51 rods kept five Chinook, one jack and released one jack and 31 steelhead. Anglers are reminded that fishing for, or retaining steelhead is not allowed this year.

Check out Terry’s detailed report (he crushes it every week!) and forecast in this week’s paid version for SW Washington Members!

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The Guides Forecast

The Guides Forecast

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Joined
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Messages
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Location
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SW Washington Fishing Update by Terry Otto

Wade Ramsey and Taleena Marsh with Buoy 10 coho. Photo courtesy Wade Ramsey

Wade Ramsey and Taleena Marsh with Buoy 10 coho. Photo courtesy Wade Ramsey

Buoy Ten Chinook closes after today, but coho still on. Local hog lines doing better, and tributaries filling with fall fish.

Vancouver Metro Area

Chinook fishing closes in the Buoy ten fishery after today. In the Vancouver area Chinook fishing is picking up, and local anglers are getting the fish to take wobblers and more in local Columbia River hog lines. Tributaries are seeing a flush of fall salmon, and fishing is getting exciting in some of them, especially the North Fork Lewis River. Trout fishing in high lakes is improving as the fish prep for the winter, and local warm water fisheries are still doing very well.

Kokanee fishing is picking up quite a bit in both Merwin and Yale, and the fish are reaching some really nice sizes as they prep for the spawn.

Lewis and Washougal Rivers Fishing Report—Big numbers of salmon have entered the Lewis River, and the fishing has been very good. Many of the fish are wild Chinook and Chinook jacks, which cannot be kept until October 1, but there are lots of coho jacks and adults, as well as summer steelhead for anglers to fill a limit with. The best bite for boat anglers has been at the hatchery, where the Meat Hole is jammed full of salmon. Most anglers are hover fishing with salmon eggs, and they are doing very well. The river is very low, and if bank anglers can reach the deep water, they are getting the fish on a variety of offerings. Spinners, drifted corkies, and bobber and salmon eggs are all getting plenty of action.

Chinook are trying to enter the lower sections of the Washougal River, and they are being joined by a few stray coho and summer steelhead. With the weir in place, anglers need to concentrate their efforts in the lower three river miles. The river is also still really low and clear, which will mean a tough bite, but the fish that have moved in will hold well. Bobber and bait is the best way to target the Chinook, which are mostly tules. When targeting the coho, twitching jigs works well.

Merwin and Yale Lakes Fishing Report—fishing has improved recently at both lakes, according to Stacie Kelsey of the WDFW Inland Fished Program. The fish are feeding hard ahead of their fall spawn, and are growing larger buy the week. The fishing is about as consistent as it has been all year, with the schools hanging in the 20-to-60-foot depth range. Trolling with kokanee flashers, and hootchies tipped with corn is still the best way to get these fish to bite.

Longview Area
Cowlitz and Kalama River Fishing Report—
A few fall Chinook have been poking their noses into the river, but not many as yet. A few coho are getting around, but once again, there are only a few. Overall, fishing is slow. The summer steelhead bite has slowed down to almost nothing, according to Dave Mallahan of Dave’s Guide Service (360-201-9313). Few boats have been fishing the river lately as a result of the slow fishing.

Bobber-dogging with bait has been the best bet for the summer steelhead, but with that run pretty much over, most anglers are turning to fall salmon. The attention will shift to the reach below the Barrier Dam in the upper river now that the fall fish are beginning to show. Still, pressure is light as yet.

Salmon are pulling into the lower Kalama River, but with the low water they are not moving upstream much. Also, with the fish collection weir in place below the Modrow Bridge, there are very few fish in the upper river. Anglers are reminded that the river is closed to fishing for, or retaining, steelhead below the railroad bridge at I-5. Only fin-clipped hatchery Chinook and coho may be kept. Anglers are getting a few to bite on bobber and bait, spinners, or by twitching jigs.

Columbia River Gorge
Salmon Fishing Report—
Drano Lake is fishing fair for Chinook, and in the latest creel survey, 10 boats/19 rods kept five Chinook and released one Chinook and eight steelhead. Trolling 360 flashers ahead of bait, spinners, or plugs has been effective. A few bank anglers are getting fish, too. The Wind River is also now producing a few fall Chinook as well, and trolling 360 flashers ahead of bait or plugs has been working. Anglers are starting to gather at the mouth of the White salmon River and the Klickitat River as well.

Check out Terry’s detailed report (he crushes it every week!) and forecast in this week’s paid version for SW Washington Members!

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The Guides Forecast

The Guides Forecast

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Messages
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Location
Oregon
Written by Terry Otto

Buoy 10 is heating up, and a few Chinook are showing in the Vancouver Area hog lines. Tributaries remain slow, but the fall fish are on the way.


Vancouver Metro Area

A few fall Chinook have been taken in local hog lines near Vancouver, although we are still a week or two from the real numbers. On some days the fish show, and on others they don’t. The tributaries are still slow, but there have been a few reports of fresh salmon, and the first good catches are on the way Chinook photo by Terry Otto
.
Warm water fisheries are hot everywhere, but the walleye bite on the Washougal Reef is still slow. Catfish, bass, and panfish are biting well just about everywhere, according to Stacie Kelsey of the WDFW Inland Fished Program. She also reports that high-country trout fishing is beginning to improve.

Lewis and Washougal Rivers Fishing Report—It’s still slow fishing on the Lewis River, but there have been reports of a few salmon being caught already. We are still a week or two away from the better fishing, but with a few Chinook showing in the Columbia already, the first good catches should come fairly soon. Steelhead angling is still very slow, and the most recent WDFW survey found 11 bank rods with no catch, while six boats/13 rods kept one steelhead.

The Washougal River is still low and clear, and the WDFW has installed the fish weir. There will probably not be much to fish for here until the first of the Chinook enter the river.

Merwin and Yale Lakes Fishing Report—According to Kelsey, the fishing at Merwin picked up some this week. The fish are still in the same patterns, from 20 to 60 feet deep, but they have been holding a little higher in the water column on the cloudy days. The schools have been a little more consistent this week, and more anglers are doing well.

Longview Area

Cowlitz and Kalama Rivers Fishing Report—
Fishing for steelhead in the upper river continues to slow down, and there have been few reports of any salmon being caught as of yet. Fishing pressure has been less, probably as most boats are out fishing Buoy Ten. Last week, Tacoma Power employees recovered 108 summer-run steelhead adults, 56 spring Chinook adults, six spring Chinook jacks, 143 spring Chinook mini jacks, 25 cutthroat trout, eight fall Chinook adults, and one fall Chinook jack during five days of operations at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery separator.

The lower river fishing is still slow, but a few fish have been caught by anglers plunking. Anglers are reminded that the river is closed to steelhead below the Lexington Bridge to protect summer steelhead bound for Idaho that enter the river to escape warm temps in the Columbia.
Chinook anglers have started fishing the mouth of the river, but just a few have been taken so far.

The Kalama is fishing very slow for the poor summer steelhead run, and anglers are looking for the first salmon of the year in the lower river.

Columbia River Gorge

Drano Lake Fishing Report
—A few thousand fall Chinook have crossed over Bonneville, and that should improve the fishing in Drano. During the last creel survey, four bank rods had no catch, while 25 boats/51 rods kept five Chinook, one jack and released one jack and 31 steelhead. Anglers are reminded that fishing for, or retaining steelhead is not allowed this year.

Check out Terry’s detailed report (he crushes it every week!) and forecast in this week’s paid version for SW Washington Members!

Get this report and a summary for all of Oregon on Thursday nights in your inbox by signing up here.
 
The Guides Forecast

The Guides Forecast

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Messages
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Location
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SW Washington Fishing Report by Terry Otto


Columbia back on for Chinook above Warrier Rock, and catches have been good in local hog lines. Tributary fishing is picking up, and blessed rain is on the way. This weekend should be very good to salmon anglers.


Vancouver Metro Area

Hog lines in the Vancouver area are getting Chinook on wobblers, but if you aren’t on the water at daybreak, you will miss the bite. Most anglers are fishing until about 8 and then going home, but the early bite has been excellent. The tributaries are really kicking out a lot of coho, even with the low water. The Lewis has been the best bet.


Warm water fishing is excellent as the fish prep for winter, and trout are beginning to get active. Once the water cools off a bit more the stockings will start at local lowland lakes.


Lewis and Washougal Rivers Fishing Report—The Lewis continues to produce lots of coho for both bank and boat anglers. The hatchery has been the best area, with the fish concentrated in the Meat Hole. Twitching jigs has been the best method, and the salmon egg bite has slowed a bit. Just about any jig with some pink on it will draw bites. In the faster water anglers are getting the fish by drifting corkies, sometimes tipped with bait.


The Chinook are slowing down and have spread throughout the river. Anglers may not keep any un-clipped Chinook until October 1.


The river is really low, so the fish are stacked up in just a few deep holes. They can be found in the faster water early morning but move off these spots once the sun climbs.


The Washougal River is still prohibitively low, but the lower holes have schools Chinook in them, and a few anglers are getting them to bite. Most of the fish in the system are tules, but there are bright fish as well, and those are more likely to bite than the tules. Bait and bobber is working, and a few have fallen to other methods.


Merwin and Yale Lakes Fishing Report—John Thompson of Sportsman’s Warehouse in Vancouver, (360) 604-8000), reports that anglers have begun getting the kokanee to bite by jigging, and the schools are beginning to move toward the bays where they will spawn. The Speelyai Bay area should produce well over the next couple weeks. Anglers are still getting the fish to bite trolled baits, with the depths varying some whether or not the sun is shining. The best depths are reportedly from 20 to 60 feet. Kokanee flashers trolled ahead of hootchies tipped with corn is still one of the best ways to get the fish to bite. Most anglers are leaving with limits.


Longview Area
Cowlitz and Kalama Rivers Fishing Report—
Fishing is slow and spotty, at least for keepable salmon, according to Thompson, and the most recent creel surveys backs that up. Below the I-5 Bridge four boats/16 rods kept one coho jack and released 17 Chinook. Chinook retention is closed on the Cowlitz this year. Above the bridge fishing is very poor, and only a few anglers are fishing up there. The river’s early coho are mostly headed to the Toutle River, and reports are that anglers are now gathering where the Toutle meets the Cowlitz. Even though the releases are a shadow of what they once were, with this year’s strong return the fishing could be decent. Drifting has always been the favored method here, but other coho methods can work sometimes.


The lower Kalama River holes are full of coho, and anglers are getting their share. It seems that just about everything will take the fish, including jigs, bait, spinners, and drift gear in the fast water. The fish are stuck below the fish collection weir below the Modrow Bridge, and will be until the river lifts. Fishing pressure has been fairly strong, and most mornings late comers may have a tough time fishing room to fish. Remember the river is closed to fishing for 1000 feet below the weir, and the river has a fly-fishing only reach, from the natural gas pipeline crossing to the deadline at the intake to the Fallert Creek Hatchery.


Columbia River Gorge

Anglers continue to do well for Chinook and a few coho at the mouths of the White salmon River, where jigging with wobblers has been effective, and the Klickitat River, where more anglers are trolling. The Chinook are slowly entering the lower Klickitat River, but low water has prevented much of a run, and the river has been brown. The rains predicted for this weekend could change that. If you fish the Klick, give Carl Coolidge of the Klickitat Canyon Market 509-369-4400 a call. He will let you know if the river is in fishable condition. Coolidge also offers a shuttle service.


Check out Terry's detailed report (he crushes it every week!) and forecast in this week's paid version for SW Washington Members!
 
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The Guides Forecast

The Guides Forecast

Member
Joined
Sep 17, 2020
Messages
237
Location
Oregon
by Terry Otto

bbe4f7cc-85e9-b6b3-2ad0-1ac6e95d9579.jpg

Columbia River salmon taken with guide Dave Mallahan
Photo courtesy Dave’s Guide Service

Columbia Chinook fishing slowed a little this past week, but there are still plenty of fish around. Most tributaries benefitted from last weekend’s rains, and local anglers did well.

Vancouver Metro Area

Vancouver area hoglines are still finding some Chinook each morning, but the bite has slowed a little bit. Numbers over the dam are still strong, and the coho numbers have picked up. Bank anglers are doing fair up at Bonneville Dam. However, the states are throwing the gill and tangle nets back in, for 17 mainstem fisheries, no less. Take that, sporties!

The recent rains brought plenty of coho into the local tributaries, and improved the fishing just about everywhere. The best fisheries are still the Kalama, and the Lewis River.
Get your warm water fish while they are still biting. Time is running out on those fisheries, while trout stockings await the local lakes.

Lewis and Washougal Rivers Fishing Report—the Lewis did come up a bit from the recent rains, but not much. Still, the fishing was better for a few days. The river has settled back down to being low, but the coho are still biting very well at the hatchery, and some other areas as well. Twitching jigs has been very effective in the Meat Hole, and bank anglers are getting some fish with jigs, too. The best colors seem to be patterns that have some pink. Drifting is effective in the fast water, especially in the early morning near the hatchery. Bobber and bait is also getting some fish.

The Washougal lifted a little following the rains, and fishing improved in the lower sections. Remember that the Camas Slough is closed until October to protect wild tules. Most of the fish being caught are biting on salmon eggs, and there have been some bright Chinook in the mix. Very few coho have been moving in, but the river has a late run, so the coho will not show in force until the middle of October.

Merwin and Yale Lakes Fishing Report—John Thompson of Sportsman’s Warehouse in Vancouver, (360) 604-8000), reports that anglers have begun getting the kokanee to bite by jigging, and the schools are beginning to move toward the bays where they will spawn. The Speelyai Bay area should produce well over the next couple weeks. Anglers are still getting the fish to bite trolled baits, with the depths varying some whether or not the sun is shining.

Longview Area
Cowlitz and Kalama Rivers Fishing Report—
Fishing is slow and spotty, at least for keepable salmon, according to Dave Mallahan of Dave’s Guide Service (360-201-9313). He reports that he fished the river below the Lexington bridge recently, and caught plenty of fish, but almost all were un-keepable Chinook or steelhead. Very few coho have been taken. Fishing is reportedly decent to good in the Toutle River, now that it has cleared out, with the best action occurring at the mouth of the Toutle. In the Toutle, the coho are biting drifted gear, bobber and bait, and jigs. Fishing bait has been the best way to get the fish to bite in the Cowlitz, which was also too dirty to fish for a few days after the rains.

Last week, Tacoma Power employees recovered 434 coho adults, 108 coho jacks, 278 fall Chinook adults, 17 fall Chinook jacks, 15 spring Chinook adults, one spring Chinook jack, 18 spring Chinook mini jacks, 21 summer-run steelhead adults, and 23 cutthroat trout during five days of operations at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery separator.

You can check river flows and lake levels, including for Mayfield and Riffe Lakes, HERE You can check the full Tacoma Power Cowlitz River Report HERE

According to Thompson, the lower Kalama is fishing very well for coho, and there are some Chinook in the mix. He has been getting some fish himself on Blue Fox Spinners, and he reports that fishing eggs has also been effective for many anglers. The river rose high enough to allow some coho to cross over the fish collection weir, situated below the Modrow Bridge, so anglers should now be able to find some of the fish in the upper reaches of the river.

Columbia River Gorge
Anglers continue to do well for Chinook and a few coho at the mouth of the White salmon River, where jigging with wobblers has been effective, and the Klickitat River, where trolling is the better bet. The Chinook are slowly entering the lower Klickitat River, but even with the recent rains the low water has prevented much of a run, and the river has been brown at times. If you fish the Klick, give Carl Coolidge of the Klickitat Canyon Market (509-369-4400) a call. He will let you know if the river is in fishable condition. Coolidge also offers a shuttle service.

See our full Oregon and SW Washington summary here.
 
The Guides Forecast

The Guides Forecast

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Messages
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Location
Oregon
by Terry Otto

Tributary coho photo by Terry Otto

Tributary coho photo by Terry Otto

Chinook has slowed in the Columbia but is still fairly good. Bonneville and the Kalama area produced best this week. Local hog lines are still getting some action, too. The tributaries have been plagued by a tough bite, but the coho are there in droves.

Vancouver Metro Area

The Fishing has slowed, but just a bit, in the local Columbia River hoglines. The Chinook just keep on coming. Anglers are now getting coho to bite trolled spinners behind 360 flashers as well. Sturgeon fishing has been slow during recent retention openers.

The tributaries are loaded with salmon, but the low water has made for a tough bite. However, this week’s rains may have helped bring in more fish and driven the coho to be more aggressive.

Local lowland lakes are beginning to pick up for holdover trout, with Battle Ground and Horseshoe showing signs of life ahead of fall trout stockings. Panfish have slowed a little but are still biting well in places.

Lewis and Washougal Rivers Fishing Report—The Lewis River is still loaded with coho, but the bite has gotten tough this past week. For example, in the latest creel survey 33 bank rods kept two coho and released one Chinook and one coho. 4 boats/8 rods kept four coho jacks. These are catches well below what they were just two weeks ago. The water is a little too low for twitching jigs, but some anglers have found success with the method. Other methods have worked better, such as bobber and eggs, spinners, or drift fishing in the fast water.

Boat anglers are targeting the Meat Hole at the hatchery, and bank anglers have been doing the same. While the numbers of fish drop as you move downstream, there is less pressure, too. Some anglers are working from the golf course up, and a few fish continue to be caught near Woodland. There is not much going on above the hatchery right now.

The Washougal has a lot of Chinook pooled up in the lower holes, but they are skittish in the low, clear water. Recent rains did help some, but more is needed. Still, there are a few bright Chinook mixed in with the tules, and those Brights bite better. A few anglers are getting some of those bright fish by throwing bobber and eggs in the deep holes. The best access is in the lower three miles of the river, and that is where most of the action is taking place.

Merwin and Yale Lakes Fishing Report—Anglers are still doing very well on the kokanee, although the crowding has been less recently. Many anglers have switched to chasing salmon in the Columbia and the tributaries, leaving more room on the kokanee lakes. The fish are still biting well ahead of the spawn, which should begin in earnest this month. Right now, the schools are holding near the mouths of the bays where they will eventually spawn. Fishers have been getting them to bite by trolling hootchies tipped with corn behind kokanee flashers, while some anglers have found success by jigging for them.

Longview Area

Cowlitz and Kalama Rivers Fishing Report—
Fishing picked up in the lower Cowlitz this week, with a few more retainable coho showing up in the mix, while fishing in the upper river remains slow. The coho being caught are mixed in with Chinook, which can’t be kept in the Cowlitz this year, and steelhead. The early returns are driven by the hatchery coho headed to the Toutle River. During the latest WDFW creel survey below the I-5 Bridge, three bank rods had no catch. 39 boats/102 rods kept 13 coho, six coho jacks, one steelhead and released 29 Chinook, 16 coho and one steelhead.

Last week, Tacoma Power employees recovered 1,786 coho adults, 700 coho jacks, 507 fall Chinook adults, 13 fall Chinook jacks, 27 spring Chinook adults, one spring Chinook jack, 27 summer-run steelhead adults, and 24 cutthroat trout during five days of operations at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery separator.

The lower Kalama is fishing well for salmon, according to reports that John Thompson of Sportsman’s Warehouse in Vancouver, (360) 604-8000), has been hearing. Last week’s rains did lift the river for a bit, but most of the fish are still below the fish collection weir located just below the Modrow Bridge. Unfortunately, Thompson said the word has gotten out about the good fishing, and the pressure has increased. Anglers are getting the coho to take spinners, bobber and eggs, jigs, and plugs.

Columbia River Gorge
There are still lots of Chinook being caught at the mouth of the White Salmon and Klickitat Rivers. Jigging wobblers works best at the White Salmon, but trolling or hover fishing is the go-to at the Klickitat.

Find our complete Oregon and SW Washington summary for the week right here.
 
The Guides Forecast

The Guides Forecast

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Vancouver Metro Area
Although it has slowed a little bit, Local hoglines continue to produce Chinook, and some anglers are doing well by trolling 360 flashers and spinners. Also, the Camas Slough opened to salmon fishing on October 1.

Local tributaries are filled with salmon, but the bite has slowed in most of them. A real burst of rain would help the bite, and that may be on the way. However, the early run of coho should be past its peak by now. The late runs of coho will start to show in a week or two.

Holdover trout are waking up in local lowland lakes, and warm water species are still biting, albeit a bit slower, in the local lakes.

Lewis and Washougal Rivers Fishing Report—The Lewis River is full of coho, but the fishing has been slow. However, the WDFW has raised the adult coho limit to 6 adults, citing the fact that the run will far exceed the hatchery brood stock needs. Also, Anglers can now keep two Chinook a day, fin-clipped or not, as part of their daily limit. Most of the action is centered around the hatchery, where anglers fishing the Meat Hole are getting a few fish to bite on salmon eggs and by twitching jigs. However, a recent creel survey shows how slow the bite has been, with 18 bank rods keeping just one coho.

Bank anglers are fishing bobber and eggs, twitching jigs, or drifting in the fast water sections. Hover fishing and twitching jigs has worked for boaters.

The Washougal has also suffered from low water, but the lower holes have good numbers of chinook in them, and some anglers are getting them to take bobber and eggs. The Camas slough has now opened for salmon, but there has been no report as yet on angler success. The slough is mostly a coho show, and the Washougal gets a strong late run. Until they start to show in a couple weeks the slough may fish slow.

Merwin and Yale Lakes Fishing Report – John Thompson of Sportsman’s Warehouse in Vancouver, (360) 604-8000), reports that anglers have begun getting the kokanee to bite by jigging, and the schools are still massing up toward the bays where they will spawn. The Speelyai Bay area has been producing well over the last couple of weeks. The best depths are reportedly from 20 to 40 feet. Kokanee flashers trolled ahead of hootchies tipped with corn is still one of the best ways to get the fish to bite, although the spawn-ready fish are also taking jigged baits.

Longview Area
Cowlitz and Kalama Rivers Fishing Report—
Things are still slow in the upper Cowlitz, but there are enough coho around now to make it worth the while to fish it. Last week, Tacoma Power employees recovered 4,552 coho adults, 1,524 coho jacks, 406 fall Chinook adults, and 10 fall Chinook jacks in a week of operations at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery. A few coho are falling for both boat and bank anglers, following a rise in the river flows. Salmon eggs, jigs, and plugs are all getting bit right now. The reach from the Barrier Dam down to Blue Creek is where most of the coho are holding.

The lower river is still fishing fair to good, with a mix of Chinook, steelhead, and coho ending up in the batch. Most of the Chinook are now turning dark. Drifting and bobber and eggs have taken many of the fish, but some are taking jigs. In the Cowlitz itself salmon eggs, fished beneath a bobber, has been the go-to, but plugs, spinners, and jigs are also scoring.
The Kalama is full of Chinook and coho salmon, with most of the action still taking place in the lower river below the fish collection weir. Spinners, bobber and eggs, twitching jigs, or throwing plugs are all getting strikes. The word has gotten out, and the fishing pressure is pretty serious. Early mornings are best, but cloudy days have seen a better bite all day.

Columbia River Gorge
Fishing has slowed just a bit at the mouths of the White Salmon and Klickitat Rivers, with most of the Chinook starting to turn dark. Some bright fish are still available. Jigging wobblers works best at the White Salmon and trolling 360 flashers with spinners is working well at the Klickitat. Late run coho headed to the Klickitat are giving a boost to trollers there.
Local Lakes Fishing Report—Goose Lake has been fishing very well for the big cutthroats, and Rowland Lake is doing well for bluegill and a few bass.

You can read Terry Otto’s most recent article on fall turkey hunting in the Columbian Newspaper HERE.

Check out Terry’s detailed report (he crushes it every week!) and forecast in this week’s SW Washington Member’s version! Not a SW Washington Member? You can find our more about that here.

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The Guides Forecast

The Guides Forecast

Member
Joined
Sep 17, 2020
Messages
237
Location
Oregon
SW Washington Fishing Report by Terry Otto

dd2d7baa-c7fb-7f05-6d0a-02ce1a70e064.png

Tributary coho-photo by Terry Otto

Columbia Salmon fishing still good for both Chinook and coho, while the tributaries are fishing slow because of low water. The action was best below Bonneville Dam, and has been good in the Vancouver area, too.

Vancouver Metro Area

The catch in the Vancouver Area has shifted from Chinook to coho, with anglers also switching from hog lines for the most part to trolling with 360 flashers and spinners. The Camas Slough is now open, and with a few coho starting to show in the Washougal, the slough should produce some good fishing over the next month.

Tributary fishing is in a bit of a lull as the early coho and the Chinook runs peter out, and the late run of coho starts to come on. Many of the early fish are turning dark, and they don’t bite as well as bright fish will.

Lewis and Washougal Rivers fishing Report—The Lewis River is still giving up early run coho, although the bite has slowed and the fish are turning. The river is still low, although it did come up a bit. Anglers are still twitching jigs and hover fishing from boats, but the fishing pressure has dropped off a bit lately. Bank angling has also dropped off some, but anglers continue to take the fish by twitching jigs or fishing bobber and eggs, with a few anglers drifting for their fish. The bite is best early morning and it drops off mid-day. The action has centered around the hatchery, although there are signs that the schools have started moving upstream. The best action has been from Colvin Creek down to Johnson Creek.

John Thompson of Sportsman’s Warehouse in Vancouver, (360) 604-8000), reports that anglers have taken a few of the first coho to be caught in the Washougal River this past week, with anglers throwing spinners for their fish. The run is just getting going, and it should produce good bites well into November. The anglers are getting most of their fish by casting in the lower holes of the river, and trolling in the Camas Slough. There is very little public access in the river above the three river-mile mark, with the best access through the Washougal River Greenway.

Merwin and Yale Lakes Fishing Report—After a very busy year both lakes, especially Yale, are dropping way off for angler effort. Reports are the schools have begun gathering near the mouths of the creeks, and are beginning to sport spawning colors. Spinners will take the fish when this happens, but the eating quality of the fish really drops off quickly. There are still fish being caught in the main lake with the younger year class, but they are smaller than the spawning-age fish. Trolling or jigging has been effective.

Local Lakes Fishing Report—holdover trout are biting in Klineline Pond and Battle Ground Lake.

Longview Area
Cowlitz and Kalama Rivers Fishing Report—
The fishing is improving in the upper Cowlitz, but has slowed a bit in the lower river. The late run of coho has begun, as witnessed by the large numbers of coho returning to the hatchery. Last week, Tacoma Power employees recovered 6,699 coho adults, 1,977 coho jacks, 608 fall Chinook adults, five fall Chinook jacks, 37 summer-run steelhead adults, and 46 cutthroat trout during six days of operations at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery separator.

The action is best below the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery Barrier Dam down to Blue Creek. Anglers are warned that the hatchery mark rate has been low, according to Dave Mallahan of Daves Guide Service (360) 201-9313.

Thompson reports that the lower Kalama is still full of fish trapped below the fish collection weir located just below the Modrow Bridge. The early run coho are beginning to turn, and they get lockjaw when that happens, but anglers are still getting some bright fish with spinners, bobber and eggs, or twitching jigs. In the latest creel survey,
25 bank rods kept three coho and released six Chinook and four coho. 1 boat/3 rods kept one coho jack.

Columbia River Gorge
Anglers are beginning to catch more coho, but they are also still getting good numbers of Chinook at both the mouth of the Klickitat and the White Salmon Rivers. Trolling spinners is the best bet at the mouth of the Klickitat, while jigging wobblers are still working at the Whie Salmon.

Klickitat River Fishing Report—The upper river is still fishing slow, according to Carl Coolidge of the Klickitat Canyon Market (509-369-4400). He reports that Chinook are still not moving into the upper river, and anglers are finding only a few steelhead, even though river conditions are good. Lower river anglers below the Fisher Hill Bridge are getting a few Chinook, mostly by fishing bobber and eggs.
Coolidge runs a shuttle service, and anglers are reminded to give Coolidge a call at the market for the latest in river conditions and fishing.

Check out Terry's detailed report (he crushes it every week!) and forecast in this week's SW Washington Member's version!

Receive these Oregon fishing reports in your email on Thursday nights by signing up here.
 
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The Guides Forecast

The Guides Forecast

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Oregon
SW Washington Fishing Report by Terry Otto

6cbad8ec-cb99-fe7b-db6c-7fb488f76e69.jpg

Tributary coho-photo by Terry Otto

Vancouver Metro Area
Chinook angling slowing down, but tributary late coho are kicking in. Heavy rains will finally lift the rivers, bringing the prospect of better bites.


Chinook angling is slowing down in the mainstem Columbia and the tributaries, with most of the fish left out there turning dark. In the tributaries the first of the late run coho are showing up, just as real rains are arriving. With higher water the salmon will surely start to bite better, and the higher flows are better for those anglers that like twitching jigs.

Holdover trout in local lakes are beginning to bite with the cooler weather, while warm water fisheries are winding down. Fresh stockings of trout in the lakes will start with plants ahead of the Black Friday fishery.

Lewis and Washougal Rivers Fishing Report—The first late run coho have started to show in the Lewis as the early run fish are turning dark and unresponsive to angler’s baits. John Thompson of Sportsman’s Warehouse in Vancouver, (360) 604-8000), reports that anglers there have taken some very nice sized, bright, late run coho, mostly on salmon eggs, but a few have taken drifted baits or jigs.

The river has remained low for this time of year, and that has continued to keep the fish concentrated between Johnson Creek and Colvin Creek. The meat hole is full of mostly dark coho, but the bright, fresh fish have been more likely to take anglers offerings. The pressure had dropped off some, but the river has reportedly gotten crowded again with the news of the first late run fish coming in.

Bright, late run coho are showing in the lower Washougal River, with anglers getting their fish on salmon eggs and spinners. What Chinook are left are turning dark, but a few are still around and biting. The best fishing has been in the lower river, where most of the public access is to be had. Anglers are also beginning to take salmon in the Camas Slough, with trolled Wiggle Warts being the go-to.

Merwin and Yale Lakes Fishing Report—fishing pressure has dropped off at both lakes as the schools of kokanee are gathering for the spawn near the entrance of the creeks. Jigging has been effective for these fish but the quality is already dropping, and the fish are coloring up. Trolling will be less effective on these fish, and the fishing will be a bit slow for a while until the spawn is over, and the next year class start to grow large enough to attract attention. The tiger muskies in Merwin, and the trout, are also slowing.

Longview Area
Cowlitz and Kalama Rivers Fishing Report—
The upper Cowlitz is fishing better, and the mark rate has improved a little bit as the first late run hatchery coho arrive. There have been plenty of coho in the river, but many have been of wild origin from adult plantings in the upper watershed over the last few years. Those un-marked fish can’t be kept. Bobber and eggs have been the best offering so far, but some anglers have been twitching jigs, too. Plugs and spinners have also taken a few fish, and bank anglers are also drifting at times. The closer to the Barrier Dam you get, the more concentrated the fish are, and the people.

Angling in the lower river has slowed, but the fish headed to the upper river are passing through the lower river, and there will be fresh fish moving through for the next month at least. River conditions have been good, but that is about to change. Stationay methods can work, but when the schools hold up anglers can get them to take jigs and salmon eggs. Plugs are also effective.

The fish collection weir in the Kalama River was removed this week, and now the schools of fish can access the upper river. The lower sections, below the Modrow Bridge, have been where the best action has been so far, with anglers getting coho and Chinook on a wide variety of offerings, including plugs, spinners, salmon eggs, and jigs. In the latest creel, nine bank rods kept two coho, one coho jack and released two coho jacks.

Columbia River Gorge
Drano Lake, Wind River Fishing Report
—Coho have been biting at the mouth of the Wind River, where the latest creel survey found one bank rod releasing one coho, while eight boats/14 rods kept six coho and released two Chinook. Spinners trolled behind 360 flashers is what most anglers are using. At Drano Lake anglers are still getting mostly dark Chinook, with a few stray coho in the mix. No coho are stocked into Drano Lake now.

Check out Terry's detailed report (he crushes it every week!) and forecast in this week's SW Washington Member's version!

Get this and our entire Oregon and SW Washington fishing summary each week in your inbox. Sign up here
 
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The Guides Forecast

The Guides Forecast

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Joined
Sep 17, 2020
Messages
237
Location
Oregon
Vancouver Metro Area

Coho catches in the Columbia remain good for late run coho, while the chinook run is all but over. Rising waters are forecast for this weekend, and should bring fresh coho into all the tributaries. Weekend prospects looking pretty good in most rivers.


Trolled spinners are still catching coho in the Columbia and the Camas Slough, and the tributaries are entering their final month of good fall salmon fishing. Hotspots such as the Lewis River have been producing good, bright coho, and should fish well this weekend. High flows should make twitching jigs the way to go.

Most local trout and warm water lakes have slowed, and will probably stay that way until trout stockings planned ahead of Black Friday.

Lewis and Washougal Rivers Fishing Report–Fishing has been pretty good in the Lewis River this last week, although the river was dropped on Wednesday, and will be every week to allow biologists to conduct carcass surveys. The fish do not like that quick change in flows, so the middle of the week will be tough fishing going forward. The late run fish are running much nicer than the early run coho, with fish topping 15 pounds at times. Recent creel surveys show bank anglers doing well at the hatchery by fishing jigs, bobber and eggs, and drift gear.

There are fish schooled from Colvin Creek down to Johnsons Creek, but anglers are also finding fish as low as Woodland. Boat anglers are doing well from the Golf Course up to Colvin Creek, while most bank anglers are targeting the hatchery or the fast water in Woodland.

The Washougal is fishing well at times for late run coho, with the best action taking place in the lower three miles of the river, where the access is best. The river conditions are good, and the fish are biting better because of it. The fish are taking jigs, salmon eggs, spinners, and drifted gears. Some very nice sized coho are in the mix, with reports of fish up to 18 pounds.

Merwin and Yale Lakes Fishing Report—fishing pressure is still lower than usual at both lakes as the schools of kokanee are beginning to spawn in the creeks. However, the next year class of fish are starting to show up for anglers trolling, and Jigging has been effective for these fish, too. The WDFW rating the fishing as fair, but the quality is dropping for the largest fish. The tiger muskies in Merwin, and the trout, are also slowing.

Longview Area

Cowlitz and Kalama Rivers Fishing Report—
Last week, Tacoma Power employees recovered 7,411 coho adults, 975 coho jacks, 126 fall Chinook adults, one fall Chinook jack, 68 summer-run steelhead adults, and 133 cutthroat trout during seven days of operations at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery separator. Anglers continue to catch coho in the upper river, although many of them are un-marked coho that can’t be kept. The numbers of clipped coho have increased over the past couple weeks, as the hatchery fish have joined the progeny of the many salmon released into the upper river over the last five or six years.
Many of the fish taken have fallen to bobber and eggs, jigs, or plugs. While the upper river has been good, the lower sections of the Cowlitz have been blown out below the Toutle River.

The fishing pressure in the upper river has been moderate to heavy at times, with both boat and bank anglers targeting the reach from Blue Creek up to the Barrier Dam. River conditions have been good, and on some days the bite has been very good. The fish are running larger than the early run fish, with many coho topping 15 pounds.

Anglers have been doing well on the Kalama River by hitting the river when the fish have gone on the move. Coho are now spreading through the full length of the river, but timing is important. When the fish are on the move they have been taken in the lower and middle sections on a variety of baits, including jigs, salmon eggs, spinners, and plugs. When the river rises the fish have gone on the move, and have holed up when the river starts to drop. Drift boaters are Looking to the middle sections for the coho, while some bank anglers have found success up in the Canyon.

Columbia River Gorge

Klickitat River Fishing Report and Forecast—
The coho run is peaking in the lower Klickitat River, and the forecast rains are expected to bring the river up, albeit by just a bit. However, when the Klickitat rises anglers can search for the fish in areas below the canyon and expect to find schools of moving coho. Once the river drops the action is best in the canyon.

Local Lakes Fishing Report—Goose Lake has been fair for cutthroat trout. All other lakes are slow right now.

Check out Terry's detailed report (he crushes it every week!) and forecast in this week's SW Washington Member's version!

You can find this and our complete report in your inbox on Thursday nights, sign up here.
 
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The Guides Forecast

The Guides Forecast

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Messages
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Terry Otto Trib Coho Fishing Report

Terry Otto Trib Coho Fishing

Columbia fisheries are finishing up for the fall, although a few hotspots remain active. Tributary fishing has remained steady is some rivers, while slowing in others. However, heavy rains may blow all the systems out before this weekend.

Vancouver Metro Area


Tributary fishing has held up well in spots and slowed a bit in others. The Lewis and Kalama continue to provide opportunities, but the rains late this week may ruin the rivers for some time, especially this weekend. The Columbia has dropped off, but a few Coho are available in the Camas Slough. However, high, dirty water may ruin that fishery.

The next year class of kokanee are showing in the lakes, and trout angling is picking up. The Black Friday trout fishery stockings will start soon, and the lakes will not close prior to stocking.

Lewis and Washougal Rivers Fishing Report—High water in the Lewis has slowed the fishing, although there are still some late run coho available. The latest creel survey had Nine bank rods keeping one coho, whiles three boats/four rods kept two Chinook jacks and four coho. Reports put a good bite at the golf course over the last week, which means there are still coho in the river that have not yet staged up at the hatchery. Good bites this week have come on bobber and eggs, or by twitching jigs. Pink, black, and chartreuse have been good jig colors.

Bank anglers have not done as well lately, which is probably a result of the high water, with the river running at the 13.2-foot stage as of midday Thursday and climbing. In the high flows the salmon are being pushed into back eddies, or being forced in towards the bank. Some bank anglers are drifting in addition to fishing eggs or twitching jigs.

The Washougal is also on the rise, and while the fishing had been fair to good for late run coho, the high flows have gotten the coho on the move upriver, where there is little or no public access. The fish still holding in the lower river pools have been taking jigs, salmon eggs, and drifted gear lately. The high water also has the fish taking spinners and plugs.

Merwin and yale Lakes Fishing Report—The WDFW reports fishing in both lakes as fair to good, with the next year class showing well in catches. They are smaller than the spawning age fish, but those older fish that are still in the lakes are very much dark and poor eating. Trolling hootchies or wedding rings tipped with corn behind kokanee dodgers has been effective, and some anglers are doing well by jigging. Look for the schools to be in depths from 20 to 40 feet, but they care sometimes moving shallower on cloudy, wet days.

Longview Area

Cowlitz and Kalama Rivers Fishing Report
—Late run coho continue to bite in the upper Cowlitz, although the bite has slowed somewhat recently. Last week, Tacoma Power employees recovered 6,568 coho adults, 877 coho jacks, 74 fall Chinook adults, two fall Chinook jacks, 17 summer-run steelhead adults, and 131 cutthroat trout during seven days of operations at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery separator. The fish, and fishermen, are concentrated the closer you get to the Barrier Dam. The mark rate has been decent, and there are plenty of fresh coho available. Most of the fish are falling for anglers fishing salmon eggs or twitching jigs, and a few are being taken by bank anglers drifting corkies or bait. Sea-run cutts have at times been taking the corkies.

The river has been coming up, and that has pushed the fish toward slow water and enar the banks, although the upper river has not been as flashy as the lower sections. Below the Toutle the river is in poor condition, and will remain so for the foreseeable future. Above the Toutle anglers are finding a few fish, but most of the coho are now in the upper river.

The Kalama River continues to fish well for late run coho, with the latest creel survey finding 79 bank anglers keeping 21 coho, one steelhead and releasing two Chinook and four coho. 16 boats/38 rods kept 18 coho, one steelhead and released one Chinook jack, two coho and one coho jack. The fish are spread through the system from the canyon to the mouth, and anglers are taking them on a wide variety of offerings, including salmon eggs, jigs, spinners, and plugs.

Columbia River Gorge

Klickitat River Fishing Report–
The Klickitat River below the canyon has been producing late run coho and has fished very well the last two weeks. With the river expected to rise this weekend, fresh coho may enter the river, but it the heavy rains may lift the river too much, and blow it out.

Check out Terry’s detailed report (he crushes it every week!) and forecast in this week’s SW Washington Member’s version!

Receive our Oregon and SW Washington summary report in your email on Thursday nights by signing up here.
 
The Guides Forecast

The Guides Forecast

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Joined
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Messages
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Location
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High water vexing anglers in some tributaries, while other rivers are fishing great for coho on the drop. Fishing in the Columbia is pretty much over, with the action slowing in most places. Trout action is improving in local lakes.

Vancouver Metro Area


Coho continue to bite very well in those rivers that are on the drop, but a few tribs are dealing with hangovers from the recent high water. SW Washington was luckier than points north, with most streams staying below flood levels.

Lowland trout lakes are beginning to fish well for holdover trout. Black Friday stockings will begin next week, and anglers need not wait for the holiday to fish. The lakes will remain open, so its game on once the trucks drop the trout. You can read Terry Otto’s recent article in the Columbian on Black Friday trout fishing HERE.

Lewis and Kalama Rivers Fishing Report—The Lewis is still running high, but many fishermen, bank anglers especially, are doing very well. During the latest creel survey, 37 bank rods kept seven coho and released one coho. 5 boats/12 rods kept one Chinook, one coho and released one Chinook. The high water and heavy flows have pushed the schools of coho near the banks, giving bankies an edge, but the high water has also reduced the areas with good bank access. In a lot of places the water is up into shoreline brush. Anglers are doing well with bobber and eggs or by twitching jigs, and the action has been best from Colvin Creek down to the golf course, with the fish concentrated up by the hatchery.

The Washougal was fishing very well before the high water, but some reports say the schools moved up on the freshet, and are now concentrated in the upper river, where public access is poor. Bobber and bait, or drifted gears were working well, and still should for the fish remaining down low, but those numbers are low. Also, there are few fish left in the Camas slough, and that fishery is pretty much over for the year.

Merwin and Yale Lakes Fishing Report—anglers are doing well for the next year-class of kokanee, although the fish are smaller than the spawners. The water has colored up some, but it does not seem to be affecting the bite. If you get on the fish the water is clear enough for a decent bite. Trolling hootchies or wedding rings tipped with corn behind kokanee flashers is the best way to go, although some anglers are getting the fish by jigging kokanee spoons.

Longview Area

Cowlitz and Kalama Rivers Fishing Report—
The Cowlitz was fishing well before the recent rains, and the river is suffering right now, according to Dave Mallahan of Dave’s Guide Service (360-201-9313). He reports that he was getting limits by fishing plugs before the river blew out. There is reportedly a landslide on the Tilton River, and that has dirtied the water quite a bit. Before that the fish were taking plugs, spinners, jigs, and bobber and bait. Most of the schools are concentrated up near the Barrier Dam, and within the first couple miles below that. He also reports that the mark rate has been decent, with about half the fish being fin-clipped, retainable fish. There are lots of wild coho in the river, so anglers need to be careful about netting those fish or pulling them out of the water.

The lower sections of the river are not fishing very well right now, since most of the coho have moved up into the upper sections. Dirty, un-fishable water is the cast in all stretches of the river, but especially below the mouth of the Toutle.

The Kalama River is fishing very well, according to John Thompson of Sportsman’s Warehouse in Vancouver, (360) 604-8000. Thompson took a couple coho this week in the lower river, and he reports that there are coho spread through the entire river. He described the fishing as being really good right now, since the river went on the drop, and he said the flush took most of the leaves and other debris out of the river. He has been taking his fish with spinners, and other anglers are getting fish on just about any coho bait, including bobber and eggs, jigs, and plugs.

Klickitat River Fishing Report and Forecast—anglers in the lower river are still getting good bites from the late run coho, and most of the fish have moved in off the mouth, so the fishing is slowing a bit out there. Anglers have been getting them to take spinners or plugs trolled behind 360 flashers. In the river the anglers are getting most of the fish on salmon eggs, jigs, and drifted gear.

Check out Terry's detailed report (he crushes it every week!) and forecast in this week's SW Washington Member's version!

Receive these SW Washington and Oregon fishing reports in your email on Thursday nights by signing up here.
 

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