Scientists have made the first synthetic life form

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GraphiteZen

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They have done it! *Must watch*!!

They have done it! *Must watch*!!

....It's pretty stunning when you just replace the DNA software in the cell and that cell instantly starts reading that new software, starts making a whole different set of proteins, and within a short while all the characteristics of the first species disappear and a new species emerges from this software that controls that cell moving forward.

Craig Venter creates synthetic life form | Science | The Guardian
 
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the_intimidator03

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I will say this was posted once before... I think TTFishon posted it... i will say... altho its an amazing feat. I totally disagree with it.
 
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GraphiteZen

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I respect your beliefs, you are certainly entitled to follow and support or not support what you know to be right and wrong. Personally, I applaud the accomplishment for I feel it's something that needs to be done. Either way it will certainly be interesting to see where it leads!
 
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the_intimidator03

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well... i can't control where it goes but i can duck and cover lol. That is exactly the way it needs to be looked at... your beleifs, my beleifs, their beleifs. are just that beleifs. Like you said... yes it is an amazing feat regardless where i stand on the subject. All i can say is i hope its used responsibly.
 
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GraphiteZen

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Agreed. So far it appears as if the scientists who hold the technology are already working with bio-medical research teams to develop new vaccines (for instance they feel they can shorten the time needed to produce flu vaccines by 99%), in addition to working with major producers of fuel to create a microbe that literally eats carbon dioxide (with the intention of reducing pollution) among a whole host of other goals, so they are off to a GREAT start!! But, as always, it will open up a whole new weapons race eventually. Still, I feel it has to be done. IMO we are at a point where we simply have run out of options.
 
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GraphiteZen

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Imagine the fish finders we will have in 10 years!!! You know, the kind that swim around the lake for an hour then come back and talk to you hahah!!!
 
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Outdoor_Myers

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Maybe just maybe they might use this to help repopulate our fishery and so the hatchery fish can actually reproduce?!
 
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GraphiteZen

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There are really some people freaking out about this. I can tell you one thing: If it's silicone based the days of the intermittent leaky window seals are GONE!!!

I have not seen I Am Legend. I hear it's pretty cool though.
 
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Finneus Polebender

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Think history would tell any of us that this is not something to be toyed with > any possible break thrus could have unimagineable consequences if things go wrong! If you pay attention to history well the goin wrong thing is like a broken record just look to our black ocean for the latest of mans acheivements goin real good now! Of course I wouldnt have a pontoon boat or a truck to haul it in if it were not to be . Still think its yet another leap of faith on this front that has a high likelyhood of ireversible effects. Once again to smart for our own good unfortunate.
 
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GraphiteZen

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This is what a fellow member of a music equipment forum had to say. For what it's worth:

Well, its a bit overstated.

Ventner's associates have been optimizing, in slow, stepwise fashion, different procedures for assembling small genome-sized DNA molecules, removing DNA from cells, and introducing engineered DNA into the DNA-denuded cells. This is between closely related microbes with very small genomes.

Baby steps.

They are a commercial outfit and there is a need to hype each step to keep the wheels of commerce and development greased.

I am an acquaintence of Craig through our work and have worked with some of his associates in the past. He is provocative and forward thinking, but not the only game in town.

More to come in the near future though, and from many labs...

DS
The comments about Craig Venter being a "provocative and forward thinker" and the need for sufficient 'hype' to keep the wheels of commerce suitably greased go together very well.
 
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GDBrown

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New Life?

New Life?

I'm late again! Did they make a female version from the rib of this thing? Oh, yea, they haven't figured out how to make a rib yet!

All they will do is show how little we humans know compared to the Creator of All Things

When they figure out how long a Day is to Him they will begin to understand how He did it.

GD
 
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GraphiteZen

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I'm finding it to be pretty darned interesting what is going on. There is a lot of potential for really cracking some issues that have been giving the mechanical chemists and biochemists some serious problems. Like AIDS.
I asked Ventner's associate:

Ventner comments about the structure of the particular DNA strain they intend to use being formulated in a large part on a computer. Can you explain how the strains are actually introduced to the cell? Simply put is through electrical stimulation or through chemicals?
And he replied:



The sequence of the synthetic genome is nearly identical to a natural genome (previously determined by sequencing the natural genome). They modified the sequence in silico (that is, by editing it on the computer, just like editing a file in WORD), then directed a DNA synthesizing machine to create sythetic "oligonucleotide" molecules which were subsequently assembled into large sequences by a mixture of in vitro (in the test tube) DNA synthesis and in vivo (in a cell) recombination (this is what my lab does). The final assembled DNA molecules were isolated and introduced into the DNA-denuded host cell of a closely related bacterium via electroporation. In electroporation, a mixture of cells and DNA are placed between two metal plates and an electrical pulse (on the order of thousands of volts at hundreds of ohms discharged from a capacitor in the tens of microfarad range) temporarily opens pores in the cell wall and facilitates movement of the DNA into some of the cells. The mixture is then transferred to a growth medium and the cells are allowed to recover. Subsequently, bacterial clones are grown up on petri plates, the DNA is reisolated, sequenced, and the investigators determine if they succeeded in reprogramming the cell.
Each step along the way has been validated in previous publications and represent somewhat standard lab practices writ large. This paper is a proof of principle....the next big step is to make something really different. For example, Craig is hot to do metabolic engineering to create biofuels using oil-producing pathways found in some unicellular algae and related approaches...

As with all emerging technologies, it is important to "learn the banishing spell first"...I've been beating that drum for decades.
Which is pretty cool!!!
 
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