Oregon online public land maps with geolocation

Jelf

New member
Hello Everyone,

Most states, including Oregon, have detailed information showing the boundaries of various kinds of public land at the federal, state and local level. Government agencies also have all kinds of map information that is useful for all kinds of outdoor activities from fishing to hunting to hiking to 4-wheeling to horse riding to boating and everything in between.

I have started a project to locate that data where it is hosted on Geographical Information System (GIS) servers and produce online maps so everyone has a super easy way to see and use that data. Maybe these public land maps will help you find some 'sekrit' fishing spots on public land.

The types of GIS data that these online maps will display include:
1. Boundaries of public land
2. Fishing and hunting information
3. Recreation features such as picnic areas, campgrounds, boat launches, trailheads, etc
4. Habitats
5. Public safety including wildland fires and earthquakes

So far I have completed online maps for several states, including Oregon. The type of data that is available varies by state. I have also completed several national level online maps.

Below is the homepage link for this project. Please take a moment to read through the text before you start playing with the map links. Also, if you want to get the most out of these maps, be sure to read the “Tips”.

Public land map homepage:
http://www.propertylinemaps.com/p/public_land_map.html

Want to see the legend for a map? Click the “About this map” link in the upper left corner.

All of these online maps are displayed by Gmap4 which is an enhanced Google map viewer that I developed. Using the same software to display all of this GIS data from coast-to-coast means you see a consistent interface based on the familiar Google maps and you also get the same broad feature set for every map.

For those that are GIS savvy (or would like to be) you can peek under the hood and see how the magic works by visiting my GIS page (written at a newbie level):
http://www.mappingsupport.com/p/gmap4_gis-viewer.html

Wait... there’s more... or soon will be.

Most GIS features you see on these maps have more information (called “attributes”) stored on the GIS server. Currently Gmap4 does not let you click a GIS symbol and see the attribute data. I plan to add that feature this winter.

Enjoy!

Joseph, the Gmap4 guy
 

ChezJfrey

Well-known member

Jelf

New member
Is this an ad by a new member? Tony

In addition to using Gmap4 to look at GIS data you can also use it to surf high resolution USGS topographic maps. Here is a link that displays the "t4 Topo High" basemap and is centered at Lincoln City when the map opens.
http://www.mappingsupport.com/p/gmap4.php?ll=44.954004,-124.010982&z=15&t=t4

Developing and enhancing Gmap4 is part of my way to "pay it forward". It is popular with people that enjoy a wide range of outdoor activities.

There are three ways to access different features.
1. The “Menu” button lets you search, geolocate, change the coordinate format, get the declination and do various other things.
2. The other button always displays the name of the current basemap. This button lets you change the basemap and also turn GIS overlays on/off.
3. A rightclick anywhere on the map will display the coordinates in several formats for the point you clicked.

The Gmap4 homepage has a FAQ, examples, quick start info (on the Help page) and more to quickly get you up to speed.

One of the articles on the Help page shows you how to use Gmap4 on your smartphone offline.

Gmap4 default map: http://www.mappingsupport.com/p/gmap4.php

Gmap4 homepage: http://www.mappingsupport.com/p/gmap4.html

Joseph, the Gmap4 guy
 

Jelf

New member
I agree, this looks good based on my quick testing of the Oregon map...thanks for posting it Joseph. It reminds me a bit of the very good Wilderness.net mapping that U. of Montana put together but it looks like you might have added to what can be displayed...cheers, roger

http://www.wilderness.net/index.cfm?fuse=NWPS&sec=stateView&state=co

Thanks for the kind words.

Here is a link that starts Gmap4 and displays the U Montana wilderness layer. There are also a bunch of other layers you can turn on/off and restack.

http://www.mappingsupport.com/p/gma...com/p/public_land_map/USA/USFS_recreation.txt

Joseph, the Gmap4 guy
 

Casting Call

Active member
The link is offered as a "public service" and displays links and various state map data with overlays for public land and other info tidbits.

Go ahead, look at Oregon, I promise it won't bite: http://www.propertylinemaps.com/p/public_land_map/state/OR/_oregon_layers_on.html#layer_button
http://www.mappingsupport.com/p/gma...land_map/state/OR/OR_public_land_boundary.txt
Chez I belive you have established yourself as a person of integerity and I trust your judgement. Even when you are keeping things on the lighter side and are joking around. Have a great New Year. Tony
 

ChezJfrey

Well-known member
Chez I belive you have established yourself as a person of integerity and I trust your judgement. Even when you are keeping things on the lighter side and are joking around. Have a great New Year. Tony

I appreciate it. I did some poking around on the site and given the OP and the links provided, it looks fair and above-board to me. As for my judgment and/or joking around, I have no idea what you're talking about. If my judgment errs, don't expect or ever try making me admit it....no joking matter! ;)

Cheers and you have a good New Year too!
 

Irishrover

Moderator
Most Featured
This should fun because I enjoy reading maps. There is a lot of history to be found in maps. I did however check out the map site for the Crooked River Grass Lands and found the boundary lines to be way off near the Crooked River south of Culver and west of Juniper Butte. Sections of land were block out as federal grass land but in actuality they are private farm land. The online map didn't even line up with the paper maps given out by the BLM for the Crooked River National Grass land. I'd be careful about using this as a resource. I have copies of the original surveys going back to the late 1800 with copies of the original survey notes up to the surveys done by the Jefferson County surveyor to re- monument the area in the mid 2000 era. I still think it will be fun to read these maps. I have a lot of respect for those old time surveyors out there with axes and chains and crews. Thanks for posting and welcome to the site.
 

Jelf

New member
I did however check out the map site for the Crooked River Grass Lands and found the boundary lines to be way off near the Crooked River south of Culver and west of Juniper Butte. Sections of land were block out as federal grass land but in actuality they are private farm land. The online map didn't even line up with the paper maps given out by the BLM for the Crooked River National Grass land. I'd be careful about using this as a resource.

Good point.

One problem with most GIS data is the lack of "metadata". Typically a GIS server does not have information explaining about where the data came from, the date the information was collected, the accuracy of the data or how often it is updated.

Also, I spend time looking for multiple sources of boundary line data. If you see major errors in a boundary when you look at one layer, then mabe there is another layer you can turn on that will be closer to correct.

Joseph
 

Jelf

New member
Here is an update on my ongoing project to produce online maps that show public land and other recreation information.

All of the maps in this project display data that is hosted on GIS servers. Think of GIS servers as having two kinds of data. One kind of data can display symbols and boundary lines on the map. My first post in this thread talked about that kind of data.

The other kind of information a GIS server has is attribute data. This consists of fields of information about the symbols and boundary lines that can be displayed on the map.

Gmap4 now has the ability to display all the attribute data the GIS server has when you click on a GIS feature you see on the map. You can try it out on this map which shows streams with winter Steelhead (as of 2009). The map opens centered near Astoria. Click the "About this map" link in the upper left corner (1) to see the map legends and (2) to learn how to turn other GIS overlay layers on and see their attribute data.

After the colored lines appear, click any stream to see the attribute data.

http://www.mappingsupport.com/p/gma.../p/public_land_map/state/OR/OR_freshwater.txt

Here is another example using a new map I added to this project. This map shows all the current USA weather watches and warnings. If you click on any of the colored areas then a popup appears that displays the attribute data. The attribute data includes links to weather service pages that have all the details for the spot you clicked.

http://www.mappingsupport.com/p/gma...aps.com/p/public_land_map/USA/USA_weather.txt

The homepage for this mapping project is:
http://www.propertylinemaps.com/p/public_land_map.html
As time allows, I will be posting map links for additional states.

Finally, every attribute popup always has a link titled “GIS server directory”. This link takes you straight to the GIS server that includes the data layer that is presently displaying attribute values on the map. A new Help page (http://www.mappingsupport.com/p/help_files/gmap4_gis_help.html) walks you through (1) understanding the key information the GIS server directory provides and (2) how to use that information to build your own custom Gmap4 links to display the GIS data that *you* want to see.

Joseph, the Gmap4 guy
 
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