More newbie questions


Red Owl

New member
Just getting started and doing some reading on drift fishing from shore/wading. Where do most of you get the tackle? On slinky weights- do you make your own? Where do you buy "pencil lead"? Just lead plumber's wire? What is the benefit of a siwash hook over a treble hook? Do you use bait or scent with your drift rigs? Yarn?
On the weight, sort of confused....do you want enough weight that it is more or less tumbling along the bottom and this corkie being pushed further downstream by the current? If you cast across current, you get a straight drift for maybe 10-15" and then it starts to swing around on a tight line?
Thanks for any help.
 

Anatoliy

Well-known member
Admin
I used a steelhead reel-rod combo from bi-mart. A beginner can't tell the difference between a cheap and a good rod, so why to pay more. Right? )
 

hobster

Well-known member
I used to use slinkies but like lead better now, you can buy at bimart and also buy a pair of fishing pliers so you can cut the desired amount of lead OFF, and they have a little poker to poke holes in the lead once crimped so you can insert a snap swivel. Cheaper than slinkies and I like how you can really feel the bottom with lead. You want the lead bouncing OFF the bottom every 3 or 4 ft so you know you're down there but not dragging. You will get snagged, part of drift fishing. It is either a rock or fish so set it! You'll get used to the bite over time. I always test the flow when I hit the river and adjust the amount of lead so it bounces correctly, different every time.
Use octopus hooks and learn an egg loop knot so you can put yarn or eggs in the loop with a corkie. I like yarn because it holds scent, but I have caught them with just a staright corkie also. Siwash and treble hooks are for spinners/spoons, lots of opinions there, I use both.
Always keep your line tight so you can feel the bite, they will hit it when swinging but most of my bites are in the drift. Having a decent rod is more important in drift fishing than any other technique because you need to feel the bottom /bite whereas with bobbers it is visual and you don't need a sensitive rod.
Hope that helps some, drift fishing is a dying art, seems everyone on the water uses bobbers now. I have caught more fish drift fishing than any other technique, I still love it and fish that way whenever the flow is good enough. Nothing like feeling the bite!
 

Artwo

Member
Just getting started and doing some reading on drift fishing from shore/wading. Where do most of you get the tackle? I buy most of my tackle at Fisherman's in Oregon City. Although, there is a very good tackle shop in Tigard named Fish Field. On slinky weights- do you make your own? Yes, I make my own. There is a little tube like plunger device you can buy that make it way easier to make them with. You can buy one at any tackle shop. Where do you buy "pencil lead"? Tackle shop. Just lead plumber's wire? No What is the benefit of a siwash hook over a treble hook? Siwash all the way, trebles will get hung up way to often and they're also very hard on the fish if it's a native and you have to release it. Do you use bait or scent with your drift rigs? Yarn? Yes, both, my typical setup is an appropriately sized corkie with some yarn of which I will usually use some scent on or a small chunk of roe.
On the weight, sort of confused....do you want enough weight that it is more or less tumbling along the bottom and this corkie being pushed further downstream by the current? No, you only want enough weight so you are tapping the bottom every 10 feet or so during the drift. If you cast across current, you get a straight drift for maybe 10-15" and then it starts to swing around on a tight line? You want to cast slightly up stream from your location, say 2 oclock or so. As you drift you want to make sure you have good contact with your rig on the bottom, reel in slack line, hold rod fairly high in position. At the end of your drift is where it can get a little complicated. As your line starts to swing, lower your rod tip slightly and follow the swing with your rod tip. A lot of bites take place on the swing so be alert. Also, I will let my rig set just briefly at the end of the swing as I've had many fish move up and take my rig at that time. Just slightly time wise though as your weight will want to settle and it can get snagged. Now for the part when you get some more experience. At the point where your rig is about to start the swing, you can do what's known as "extending your drift". Simply by opening the bail on your reel you can let line out at a pace that the current will continue to pull your rig down stream for a ways. This technique takes some practice as it's easy to let out to much line to fast and your rig will settle and snag.
Thanks for any help.
See my comment above in red, hope some of this is helpful...................
 

Red Owl

New member
Thanks A. On opening the bail and extending the drift. How much would this be? Another 10 feet? More., less?
When you hang up, do you lose just the weight or the whole rig?
 

Artwo

Member
Thanks A. On opening the bail and extending the drift. How much would this be? Another 10 feet? More., less? When you get good at it, you can extend your drift quite a ways downstream.
When you hang up, do you lose just the weight or the whole rig? If you make your weights correctly or attach them correctly you can just loose the weight. When you make your own slinky weights be sure to punch the hole in the melted part as close to the edge as possible. With pencil lead you can do two things. Smash one end flat and punch your hole close to the edge or use a piece of surgical tubing to hold your lead. Either way, when pull the weight will break/pull off most of the time.
See comments above.....

Understand, you will loose gear drift fishing, it's just the nature of the technique.
 

kevn47

New member
I'm not an expert so just my thoughts and others here may have different opinions--If you spend money anywhere, spend it on a good drift rod. I've been steelhead fishing for about 5 years now and noticed a huge difference in the ability to feel the led bouncing through the drift as well as easily detecting the bite. If budget is a concern, I bought a Lamiglass Cascade Pro a couple of years ago (lower end of Lamis--I think they're foreign made--I know I know...shame on me :) ). It was reasonable but gave me really good feel. Also recommend Okumo Guide Select and SST. 9-9'6'' Medium power Fast action. Again--Just my own experience--but when I moved up to middle of the line priced rods, I hooked more fish.
 

my2labs

Member
Just getting started and doing some reading on drift fishing from shore/wading. Where do most of you get the tackle? On slinky weights- do you make your own? Where do you buy "pencil lead"? Just lead plumber's wire? What is the benefit of a siwash hook over a treble hook? Do you use bait or scent with your drift rigs? Yarn?
On the weight, sort of confused....do you want enough weight that it is more or less tumbling along the bottom and this corkie being pushed further downstream by the current? If you cast across current, you get a straight drift for maybe 10-15" and then it starts to swing around on a tight line?
Thanks for any help.
1.) Where to buy gear: Fishermans/Cabelas (though their selection seems to have nose dived now that Bass Pro bought them)
2.) Slinkies: Yes make own - very easy.
3.) yes - pencil lead. super simple - remake them in useful weights so that they are available when you need them.
4.) bait/scent - yes - especially with Yarnies
5.) Weight - skip every 8 - 10'. No sudden pauses, no constant bottom grabbing.... "match the flow" of the water.
6.) for greater info - watch your tube videos. There are many. Maybe check out some Angler's West episodes. Many to offer, entertaining to watch/learn from.
 

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