I'm interested in fly fishing, but have questions

T
Tai
Hello all!

I am interested in Fly Fishing but I have a few questions that are kind of holding me back from taking the plunge.

(1) I still have yet to understand the wt system. I want to fish Salmon and Steelhead, but Im not sure what wt rod I should be aiming to purchase( if thats even correct).

(2) How situational is fly fishing? When/where are the best times/places to fly fish? (i.e fast riffles, calm waters, bank fishing, etc)

(3) Is fly fishing really expensive to get into? I would like to learn more about its techniques without breaking the bank, or spending a ton on gear just to break my first rod.

(4) How was your first experience fly fishing, have an tips/websites/info?




Thanks in advance everyone! :D
 
M
mlw
1) There are two weight systems for fly rods, for single hand rods, and two handed rods (spey and switch) - the spey rod weights are two or three weights heavier than single handed - so a 6 weight spey or switch rod is equivalent to a 8 weight single handed rod. For steelhead you want a 7-9 weight singlehanded rod or a 6-8 spey or switch (switch rods are usually 10-11 ft long, spey 11' plus, single handed 9').
2) all of the above.
3) More expensive than gear, find a used rod/reel, buy a good flyline, leaders, tippet fly - you can ease into it.
 
S
Spydeyrch
Well, I have been fly fishing since the beginning of this year, so I am a novice. So perhaps someone that is just starting out like myself may have some good advise for another who will be starting out.

I will try to answer your questions to the best of my ability, but like I mentioned above, I am a novice still. So any other pros feel free to chime in and correct me or input your guru counsel. :D

(1) I still have yet to understand the wt system. I want to fish Salmon and Steelhead, but Im not sure what wt rod I should be aiming to purchase( if thats even correct).

I would say go with an 8wt or a 9wt rod for steelhead and salmon fishing. Probably a 9wt would be the better of the two for a novice. You have three options as far as rod types: single handed, swtich, and spey. I have read and heard that spey is going to be the best for salmon and steelhead, but that is probably a matter of personal opinion. I, myself, am tending to lean toward a spey rod for this year's winter steelies and salmon.

(2) How situational is fly fishing? When/where are the best times/places to fly fish? (i.e fast riffles, calm waters, bank fishing, etc)

When you say situational, I am assumming that you mean when can it be used and when can it not be used. Is that correct? Well, so far, I haven't found a time when I can't use my fly gear.

I have fished lakes (stillwater), creeks, streams, rivers, etc. I haven't fished the surf yet but it is on my list. :D

I have fished pools, riffles, tailouts, runs, channels, and the majority of the time I have done it from the bank or wading through the water. I have targeted trout, bass, panfish (i.e. blue gill, pumpkin seed, etc), shiners, etc.

I haven't done any salmon or steelie fishing on a fly this year but this will be the first year so it is coming!!! YAHOO!!! :dance:

(3) Is fly fishing really expensive to get into? I would like to learn more about its techniques without breaking the bank, or spending a ton on gear just to break my first rod.

It can be expensive, yes. But if you take your time, do the proper research, ask a lot of questions, and do more research. You can save yourself some good money and still get decent gear.

After 9 months of research, I bought my first fly rod. It is an Echo Solo 9' 5wt rod. It has a lifetime no questions asked warranty. It was $99. It came with a rod sock and rod tube. Sweet rod man, I fell in love with it right off the first cast!!

Then I bought a Wild Waters Fly Fishing starter setup. It is a 3/4wt 7' 4 piece rod. It came with the rod, the reel (decent reel with decent drag system), backing, 3wt fly line, tapered leader (I think a 7.5' 5x leader), fly box (nice fly box!!), three flies, rod sock, and a nice rod tube for like $110!!! Great deal and I love using that rod. It is the rod that I primarily use now when going after small stream trout and pan fish. :dance:đź‘Ź

Oh, Wild Water also offers single rods for really cheap, but then you have to get all the other stuff. They also offer steelie/salmon setups, i.e. 7/8wt or 9/10wt setups. Check them out!! :D

With my 5wt, I had to still buy the reel, backing, line, leaders, tippet, flies, box, vest, etc etc etc. But you can get those things as you go, really. ;)

(4) How was your first experience fly fishing, have an tips/websites/info?

I would say, go out with a friend or someone that has a setup and try it out. See if you like it. Once you get your setup, practice, practice, practice. I practiced casting every day, an hour a day, for 3 months before I even touched the water with my fly line. It really helps!!

Also, the Ask About Fly Fishing Internet Radio site is great, but they recently started charging for access to their archived material. But you can still listen to recent stuff for the first few weeks once it is done recording.

I think that should do it for now. If you have any other questions, feel free to ask and welcome to the best type of fishing (in my opinion) ever!!! :dance:đź‘Ź:D:cool:

Take care and best of luck to you!!

-Spydey
 
F
flyguy202011
14 foot 8 weight spey rod..........
 
F
fish4life
I have a cortland cl 9/10 weight 9' rod and a loomis reel total package with line cost me around $180 I think. Ive caught springers, steelhead, and coho on it. works good for smaller streams for larger streams I would go with a spey.
 
T
Tai
Thanks to everyone for the quick responses, this gives me a good idea on how to start.
 
brandon4455
brandon4455
don't jump into it!

don't jump into it!

excellent advice from everyone, but theres one thing nobody has mentioned. salmon and steelhead fly fishing can be diffcult,especially if you go right for the salmon and steel from the beginning. i recomend you buy a 5wt fly rod, go with someone on here and learn the ropes with trout for a while before you take the plunge and go for the bigger guys. thats what i thought i was gunna do but i got stuck on the trout... they are my fav. you can catch tons of em each outing and they are not hard to find. once you learn the ropes and slay the trouts, try your hand at the steel and then see how much easier it is. once you fly fish for a while and get the hang of the casting, reading the water and all of the nescessary skills chasing the steel should be a lot easier. i should not be the one to talk though. ive only hooked one steel on my 8wt. but then again i have only been fly fishing for steelhead 2 or 3 times. will change that this winter. good luck. fly fishing is highly addictive,gets your heart pumping and it's a blast. dont be afraid to try it.
 
O
OnTheFly
I cannot add to the supreme advice found on post #7 by Brandon and like he said, for a first time fly fisherman, start basic by targeting trout then work your way up to steelhead. It would be tragic to become discouraged in fly fishing by constantly coming home without fish then drop the whole idea altogether. Once you begin to catch trout consistantly in streams and rivers then I would suggest start thinking about steelhead.
 
H
halibuthitman
OnTheFly said:
I cannot add to the supreme advice found on post #7 by Brandon and like he said, for a first time fly fisherman, start basic by targeting trout then work your way up to steelhead. It would be tragic to become discouraged in fly fishing by constantly coming home without fish then drop the whole idea altogether. Once you begin to catch trout consistantly in streams and rivers then I would suggest start thinking about steelhead.
come home without fish.. who does that? the spey rod is a nice trendy idea, but that is spey casting.. and teaches you very little about all other aspects of fly casting and not nearly as universal as a single handed "fly" rod. as for my first expirence, well imagine living your whole life content in black and white... and all of a sudden you see in color- I would buy 7 wt echo switch rod-
 
GungasUncle
GungasUncle
Brad - I gotta go fishing with you sometime - I need to fish with someone with some positive fish mojo. I've gone home without fish every time I've fished salmon & steelhead since October 2008. 2009 I made maybe 10 trips for the big fishies, last year was more like 30, that's crappy odds - I had to have been doing something wrong, but not sure what. The vaunted bobber & jig and bobber & bait rigs failed a lot - the only hook ups I got came from drift fishing, and casting plugs. Even spinners & spoons failed me :*( - won't even get into my attempts at dredging fish up with a single hander fly rod.

I'd go with teh advise others are giving - start out with something other than salmon/steelhead when fly casting. It's easier to learn to fly cast on a lighter weight rod, than it will be the heavier sticks used for bigger fish. Trout, panfish, and bass are more eager to eat than salmon/steelhead too, and having a fish on the end of the line is a confidence booster.

But if you've got to jump into the big fish on the fly right away - Brad's suggestion of the Echo switch rod couldn't be better. I'm in love with mine, and I'll probably wind up buying one of their full length spey rods because of it. The Switch Rod gives you more versatality than the single hander or the full spey - you can cast the switch rods either single or double handed, using standard fly lines, or spey type lines, shooting heads, etc.
 
M
mezzfin
OnTheFly said:
I cannot add to the supreme advice found on post #7 by Brandon and like he said, for a first time fly fisherman, start basic by targeting trout then work your way up to steelhead. It would be tragic to become discouraged in fly fishing by constantly coming home without fish then drop the whole idea altogether. Once you begin to catch trout consistantly in streams and rivers then I would suggest start thinking about steelhead.

My situation exactly. For what it's worth, you can get a cheapo 5wt kit already tied with backing, line, & a 3X leader for around $100. Top quality? Uh, no. But you start catching trout tomorrow and learn a whole lot. Use it until it breaks, then decide where you want to spend your upgrade dollars :)
 

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