I want to start steelhead fishing! Help me

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Silverline

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I would like to start steelhead fishing on the clackamas river this year. I believe I have the right gear. I have a 7'6" Lamiglas pole and ambassador reel with 20 lb. test. Also I have an 8'6" pole. What are some good spots and techniques to use?

Thanks for input
 
L

luv2fish

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I would like to start steelhead fishing on the clackamas river this year. I believe I have the right gear. I have a 7'6" Lamiglas pole and ambassador reel with 20 lb. test. Also I have an 8'6" pole. What are some good spots and techniques to use?

Thanks for input


well if that rod of yours ( the 8'6 one )have a limber tip so as you can feel the bite of steelhead grabbin your bait/lure.....by all means its arright....but i'll downsize the line....say atleast 12 lbs..since you said you want to START....mostly people fish with 10 or 8 lb main but to be on the safer side for a beginner...i think 12 is fine....
for beginners i will say start with a float...and the reason for that is that its easy and will maintain your interest...not that drifting is hard...but you gotta get the feel of fishing first ...do you know how to rig a bobber ? well if you don't just search on archives here or google it...how to float fish for steelhead...
ppl will tell you this and that...use what you think yu can handle and what you can easily grasp or think is fairly easy to do..

most important ingredient for fishing is what suits you best and what your comfortable with......once you are comfortable with float fishing and have your interest build up ....start drift fishing which is very easy and personally my maximum hookups are on drift....which is tie your mainline to swivel..and a 10# leader ( approx..20-24 inches...mebbe longer if the water is superclear ) with # 3 hook...stick 2 split shots right before the swivel...don't pinch'em too hard as they will weaken your line...you can tie a piece of yarn on your hook or put some eggs or even a prawn tail..and your fishing... the idea is let that rig glide in water and whenever you feel anything different then the smooth gentle glide of water...set the hook...you'll get frustrated bunch of times as there will be nothing...but soon you'll be able to differentiate once you get a fish on it....means....you will know the difference betwen the bite of fish and any other obstruction ( twigs, grass, rocks etc ) in the water.
there are various ways to tig for drift as well as float....google it and see which looks easy to you and go for it...like i said if your not comfortable with the kind of rigging you do..chances are you won't catch anything...

goodluck and hope i see you here with a chrome beauty
 
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steelhead_stalkers

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I learned how to drift fish for steelhead first then learned other techniques but I think the advice about trying float fishing to get you started is good, its easy to pick up and very effective especially in small to medium rivers! Let us know if you have any other question!
 
T

Troutier Bassier

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So whats better to start with for a 12 Year old? Driftin' or Bobberin'?
 
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Mike123

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So whats better to start with for a 12 Year old? Driftin' or Bobberin'?

Bobber.
I started as a spinner only guy... took me a couple years and I was slaying fish.
Didn't take me long to catch fish on a float.
Drift fishing isn't that hard if you just learn from someone that's not a snagger on how to do it. :lol: I like using light lead and you have to learn NOT to set the hook on every bump you feel! Once you know that bite feel it's all pretty easy. I love seeing all the "drift fisherman" setting the hook so HARD that it practically creates a sonic boom! I laugh my ass OFF every time! :rolleyes:
 
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Troutier Bassier

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Learning the river.
You mean Reading Water? I already know how to do that.

I thought it would be Bobber,
I was Fishing with a Bobber for the First Time and I dident catch any but It was fun Anyways. (I sound like a Child :p)
 
Chromatose

Chromatose

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If you have the funds I would recommend that you hire a guide. Money well spent to cut down on the learning curve. There is so much to learn and keep learning.
Good Luck
 
M

Mad dog

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Bobbers....will ruin a good drift fisherman everytime! :D Too easy!

But not that easy!!!
 
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metalfisher76

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It will be a mad house but if you get some stuff ready ( bobbers, drift gear etc.) and head to Milo McIivor park. You may want to talk to the guy (Roger?) at Estacada Tackle to point you toward Dog Creek. Once there you will see every form of fishing under the sun, ALL OF IT. Watch and learn. Take it somewhere else cause chances are, if you`re like me, you won`t like the combat fishing! But you can learn a lot from a "dummy"!;)
 
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Fishtopher

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Who knows?! Not me!
Good luck man!

Good luck man!

If you will be drift fishing, take these words of advice; tie up at least 10 leaders at home the night before you go fishing. Your time on the water is priceless, and sitting there on the bank, fudgin' around tying up your setup while everyone is catching fish is a serious drag! Its sooo much nicer when you can just unroll a leader, tie it to your mainline, and be fishing again! This is the most important thing to me.

Also, I can't stress this enough, HOOK SETS ARE FREE! Use as many as you need!!! I can tell you, many many times I get angry for not setting the hook on the rock that felt like a fish....

One last idea for ya, spend time at a combat fishery, and watch the guys fish for a few. When you see a guy catcha fish, just walk up, and start a conversation, tell him your kinda new to drift fishing, and ask if he minds if you watch him re rig up. I essentially learned on the fly, at Cedar Creek. Walked in knowing little, and walked out with fish. Good luck, and soak it all in. Lotsa good advice here.
 
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autofisher

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My best suggestion is to basically act like a sponge. Soak up every bit of information you can get (good or bad) and find out what you're most comfortable with.
If you're set on trying to drift fish, try picking up "Drift Fishing for Steelhead" by Bill Herzogg. It's a very informative book that has helped me out a lot. But they are right. If you do decide to drift.... have extra leaders set up before you hit the water. Unless you are really fast at tying up new gear, you will find that more time on the water equates to more possible hook ups.
I would also suggest trying a little bit of everything to find out what you are most comfortable with. Make sure you know how to tie good knots and have your drag set up. Most of all, get out there, have fun and slay some fish
 
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