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TTFishon

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I have a question. Rarely do I read or hear about wolf encounters with man and when I do usually the wolf gets the crappy end of the stick. My question is....does man ever get the crappy end of the stick? When I say man I'm not talking about farmers or ranchers...I'm talking about general outdoorsy people. Also, I'm not trying to start anything here. It's just something I've wondered about.
 
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GDBrown

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Oregon does not have a high enough density of wolves for that yet. Plus we have fewer Outdoorsy people compared to Idaho and Montana for example.
 
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JAFO

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That's a tough question. I'll give you a popular perspective as an example. Elk were not native to Idaho, man introduced them. Fast forward 100 years, Elk heards are thriving and man decides to introduce another species, Wolf. Now man is pissed off at Wolf and the Feds for shoving them down his throat with no say in the matter. Result: Here's where your crappy end of the stick comes in to play. Like you I am not trying to start anything, just friendly debate. Maybe it's right maybe it's not, who am I to say? To be honest with you I think a Wolf Howl is awesome, but on the other hand I hate to see what they have done to my favorite hunting grounds.
 
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halibuthitman

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The first proven record of a wolf killing a human took place in canada a few years back, there have been many speculted deaths and black bears have ended up being the culprit in most of them, not saying wolves haven't killed before.. this was just the first proven situation, the person was a healthy adult male who was hiking in the winter in a remote area, evidence at the scene lead to him encountering the wolves and running= dead. always stand your ground against canines and cats, they are adept at killing fleeing prey, when you stand your ground instict makes them try to intimidate you to run, if you don't run it confuses them and makes them feel you are more dangerous than they anticipated.
 
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halibuthitman

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and if the above doesn't work hopefully the crap in your pants will deter the wolves.. I imagine nothing wants to eat something covered in ****.
 
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TTFishon

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That's a tough question. I'll give you a popular perspective as an example. Elk were not native to Idaho, man introduced them. Fast forward 100 years, Elk heards are thriving and man decides to introduce another species, Wolf. Now man is pissed off at Wolf and the Feds for shoving them down his throat with no say in the matter. Result: Here's where your crappy end of the stick comes in to play. Like you I am not trying to start anything, just friendly debate. Maybe it's right maybe it's not, who am I to say? To be honest with you I think a Wolf Howl is awesome, but on the other hand I hate to see what they have done to my favorite hunting grounds.

I understand. I'd be kinda mad too. But what about an encounter with a hiker or a mushroom picker or a someone along those lines? It's gotta happen right? Is the outcome generally good for both man and wolf? Is it confrontational or is the wolf most likely to run off?
 
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TTFishon

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The first proven record of a wolf killing a human took place in canada a few years back, there have been many speculted deaths and black bears have ended up being the culprit in most of them, not saying wolves haven't killed before.. this was just the first proven situation, the person was a healthy adult male who was hiking in the winter in a remote area, evidence at the scene lead to him encountering the wolves and running= dead. always stand your ground against canines and cats, they are adept at killing fleeing prey, when you stand your ground instict makes them try to intimidate you to run, if you don't run it confuses them and makes them feel you are more dangerous than they anticipated.

Thanks halibut. You can see where I'm going with this. Basically I have a feeling that our Oregon forrests might someday have a healthy population of wolves. I don't really have a problem with that other than my personal safety.
 
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halibuthitman

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if you managed to just walk up on a wolf, or pack for that matter I would consider you a very talented person-
 
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halibuthitman

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the danger from these wolves would not come until their interaction with people became extremely frequent, but even then they are mostly a curious animal. I lived in tents on the alaska penisula and the yakatat area for whole summers, the wolves got used to us but always seemed respectful. The alaskan " call of the wild " image wolves got, and the assumtion that they were extremely dangerous comes out of the fact that wolves did attack camps... for the sled dogs, not the people or their food, I personaly have encountered wolves many times.. never had an issue with them, now wild dogs... dangerous, and scary in my book.
 
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halibuthitman

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its a shame such a gracefull and mysterious animal should have such a scoundrel image, very sad-
 
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TTFishon

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the danger from these wolves would not come until their interaction with people became extremely frequent, but even then they are mostly a curious animal. I lived in tents on the alaska penisula and the yakatat area for whole summers, the wolves got used to us but always seemed respectful. The alaskan " call of the wild " image wolves got, and the assumtion that they were extremely dangerous comes out of the fact that wolves did attack camps... for the sled dogs, not the people or their food, I personaly have encountered wolves many times.. never had an issue with them, now wild dogs... dangerous, and scary in my book.

Thanks again HH....I appreciate it.
 
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troutramp

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HMMMm very contraversial subject so i will just stick to my experience. We have had wolves in AZ for a long time. they were "re-introduced", I am not 100 percent convinced they were ever completely eradicated. between the white mountain and san carlos Apache reservation there is 2.6 million acres @ of some pretty remote area. I have seen many of these wolves in the wild and can say it is a unique experience.Of The wolves I have seen most did not run away but rather wandered off. Keep in mind many of these wolves have had human interaction/contact in the form of USFSW personel, but some are truly wild. The wolves eat a lot of cattle thats why the Feds love them and the ranchers hate em. A wolf will eat a "beef" and the rancher will find it at some point and report it and eventually USFWS will "get around to it" and come out and "investigate". Unfortunatly by the time they come out they can't find a track and so the rancher is left with the loss, and the guberment angent walks away chuckling. If the guberment did what they said they were going to do it might be a different story. So that is the dynamic that you can look forward to here. Except in western New Mexico those ranchers dont care much for the feds, there has been several "shootings" that were investigated I dont know if the Feds ever convicted anybody.
 
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JAFO

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Not trying to split hairs here but last year a female jogger was killed in alaska, I believe it was in March.
Regardless, we agree it's pretty remote.
 
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JAFO

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They are curious and sometimes will investigate, they might even growl at you "seen it" just go about your business and you'll be fine. I know this sounds stupid but talk, something about the human voice tends to make them wonder off.
 
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halibuthitman

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Not trying to split hairs here but last year a female jogger was killed in alaska, I believe it was in March.
Regardless, we agree it's pretty remote.
I stand corrected, although the state of alaska still refuses to catgorize it as a wolf kill.. but it was. Very unfortunate, she was even wearing pepper spray. Im gonna correct myself even more.. in the 20th century there have been 20-30 wolf attacks in north america, coyotes were catagorized with wolves in this data, severly skewing the credibility of the reseach. All of the attacks that were investigated all but 2 were the results of rabies, three of those attacks were fatal, 2 of them occured in the last five years, in areas where wolves have always been present and wolf control is practiced yearly. by comparison in the same time period 71 people were confirmed killed by grizzly/ Brown bears. meanwhile 300 kills by domestic dogs in just 1980-1990, so even if you cut that number for the decade in half- 150 x it by ten for the century it would be wolves 3 dogs 1500... so I guess the main point im trying to make is don't let fear rule your life... unless it involves your own dog.. as for predation, the areas I hunt, clarke fork, Moon pass, salmo/priest, and B marshal... the black bears are whats putting a real ding in the elk populations, same as with cattle, dogs, cats, and bears and those dumb ass ranchers own fences kill more cows than any wolf pack could possibly dream of, we should start selling tags for them on e-bay, and finally odfw can have the money they say they need to work with-
 
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fheimerd

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I was out skiing in the eagle cap wilderness near the idaho border a few years ago. It was middle of the winter and we were several days away from the trailhead. Pretty remote by any standards. This was before any confirmed sighting of wolves.

All of a sudden we see this huge canine running up a ridge through deep snow. It stopped, looked at us for a while, and then went on it's way. First I thought it must be a coyote but in retrospect is was a wolf. It was bigger, stronger and far more direct in it's movement than a coyote.

I never felt like the wolf was going to eat us or was even very aggressive. More curious, just like we were.

Not sure if it has any bearing on this conversation but it changed the way I think about wolves.
 
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