Fly fishing

IKfish

Member
How can i get started? Do i need a flyfishing guide or to start by myself?
What rod & reel & line is good for a beginner to learn?
 

markasd

Active member
What are you going to target?
Lots of variable for the fly rig set up - small fish vs big fish, two handers or single hander.
Where you located?
If you want meet up, I'd give you a few pointers - guides are good to get you into fish, if you want fly lessons though - lookup the local fly shop.. Usually have a few guys that'll give lessons.
 

sugarcity

New member
How can i get started? Do i need a flyfishing guide or to start by myself?
What rod & reel & line is good for a beginner to learn?
I have been fly fishing for over fifty years.
Guides will put you light years ahead. You will learn techniques in days that would take years to pick up on your own. Hire a couple, then start putting your kit together. It will make much more sense then.

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Southpaw

Active member
I'm a 100% self taught with ton of frustrations in the beginning and there is no substitute for commitment and time on the water and making practice and casting part of your routine. Many may suggest lawn casting, but I'll say it will still shorten the life on your line and promote more cleaning to keep it working great. Get on the water and practice! I usually practice at least 3 times a week year round and in areas I don't plan to actually fish. It's good to practice in different flow rates, depth of water, and calm vs windy days to understand how to adjust your casting so when you are fishing you can adapt to the conditions and make it count. I never brought any spinning gear to stay focused and not give up, I've never fished with conventional gear anymore no matter what species I'm after year round. I'm in Eugene, if you want to see options of types of rods and different actions, single hand vs two hand I have it all to help you understand. I have a true passion for two hand rods whenever I can, but there's no substitute for a nice dry fly presentation on a moderate action fly rod when the hatch is on! Good luck and message me if you want a short cut to the fly world while I took the stubborn determined approach, yet I don't regret as I've gotten many compliments on my casting from several people in the fly world and business.
 

IKfish

Member
Southpaw;n610813 said:
I'm a 100% self taught with ton of frustrations in the beginning and there is no substitute for commitment and time on the water and making practice and casting part of your routine. Many may suggest lawn casting, but I'll say it will still shorten the life on your line and promote more cleaning to keep it working great. Get on the water and practice! I usually practice at least 3 times a week year round and in areas I don't plan to actually fish. It's good to practice in different flow rates, depth of water, and calm vs windy days to understand how to adjust your casting so when you are fishing you can adapt to the conditions and make it count. I never brought any spinning gear to stay focused and not give up, I've never fished with conventional gear anymore no matter what species I'm after year round. I'm in Eugene, if you want to see options of types of rods and different actions, single hand vs two hand I have it all to help you understand. I have a true passion for two hand rods whenever I can, but there's no substitute for a nice dry fly presentation on a moderate action fly rod when the hatch is on! Good luck and message me if you want a short cut to the fly world while I took the stubborn determined approach, yet I don't regret as I've gotten many compliments on my casting from several people in the fly world and business.
Awesome. I used to do bass fishing but it's not like traditional fishing. It seems much more difficult to start by myself. I wonder where did you learn from, like watching videos on YouTube, fly fishing forums or books. I plan to learn some basic tips before taking lessons.
 

Southpaw

Active member
Awesome. I used to do bass fishing but it's not like traditional fishing. It seems much more difficult to start by myself. I wonder where did you learn from, like watching videos on YouTube, fly fishing forums or books. I plan to learn some basic tips before taking lessons.
All the above, as far as YouTube there's several good ones. Paying close attention to the details as I'll replay cast over and over looking for the little things that seem to make the difference in technique. Depending on if you're looking at single hand or double hand rods, some of my favorites would be Pete Kutzer from orvis, reds fly shop for every technique rigging and gear, Ashland fly shop but they mostly favor spey. These are some good starting places to look. Even to this day I read and watch tons of info daily. A few hours each night. I do also follow most local blogs for info on stuff that seems reactive to where I'll go with fly selections and new I may not have tried yet. Caddis fly, Ashland, gorge fly shop, Deschutes angler, and gink and gasoline for blogs. That should be enough info for you to scour daily for the next few months. May seem overwhelming but just get out there and get on the water. Hit the same spot every time you go out and pay attention to changes and look down for aquatic life. Guarantee if you did that for a year seeing the changes throughout the season a lot will start coming together. One of the reason I like fly fishing is that is always changing and never gets old trying to figure out how to adapt and understand why you're successful one day and not another. Consistency will come believe me. Never stop reading and analyzing and critiquing yourself


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