Cedar Creek 1/24 *img rich

F

FishFinger

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Joined
Jul 27, 2008
Messages
1,217
Location
Central Oregon
After a few false starts and weather delays.... I finally got a chance to hit the Sandy yesterday morning.

Started the hike in about 6:30 am. I was amazed at the amount of flood damaged that occurred in the flats, just below the short but steep 3rd down grade. I've been down this trail thousands of times and I hardly recognize it at all.

Trying to navigate the trail among all the down trees and debris was rough. Because it was so dark I totally lost the trail and had to do some serous bushwackin. Finally I made it to the mouth of Cedar Creek about 7:15.

The water was running clear, cold, and fast, perhaps the fastest 10.5 I've seen since the removal or marmot dam. About a dozen other anglers joined me. Several guys thought about crossing but only two did and in chest deep waters.

I put in maybe an hour and a half at the creek seeing only one fish roll and none hooked.

How many guys do you think will be out on this leaner come Coho season...
DSCN0366.jpg


OK, so I bail the mouth and head up to hell hole. The flood increases the cut behind the cobble bar @ Hell hole. Half way across what I thought was a shallower spot, I started second guessing my judgement. Being too far along to turn back, I kept going. If not for my studded Korkers, I would have gone swimming; no doubt about it.

Finally I arrive at Hell hole

DSCN0369.jpg

Granted it only a shadow of its former self, with the landslide being cleared out the flow is starting to return, but a least half the water still flows behind the cobble bar. * the lighter tan area of the opposite bank is all that remains of the landslide.. Its scar for that matter.

Just as I get ready to start drifting some eggs I look down river and see this..
Boy and I thought I picked a bad place to "cross" and I was only going half as far across. It was a painfully slow process as they inched their way across.

DSCN0367.jpg

I have no idea what they were thinking, True enough last fall it was ankle deep there they are standing but not right now!

So I make a few casts and I notice some kayaks coming down river followed by a yellow toon. Being polite I stop and let them pass, as their course was right down the middle of the hole.. As the toon passes I see "Sandy river search and rescue" painted on the side. Talk about great timing.. the guys down stream might just need some help.

By the time they floated down to them the two guys just made it to the other side of the river.

DSCN0370.jpg

So now I can get back to fishing... Suddenly I both hear and feel this low frequency rumble. Initially I thought I was being buzzed by a F-18.

On Sept 12, 2001; Andy and I were fishing near the I-84 bridge over the Sandy. This is when the only planes in the sky were military fighters jets.
Standing there looking up I had a moment of specific clarity.. I'm in that pilots "kill box". I'm one finger twitch away from being "hell fired". How was he to know I wasn't a terrorist setting a charge to destroy an interstate overpass. The hair on the back of my neck still stands on end when I think about it.

Ok back on point here.

A split second later I look up river and see a huge mass of boulders tumble down the slope and into the river. I ran as fast as I could to get my camera; I couldn't catch the landslide in action but I did get the aftermath.

DSCN0372.jpg

DSCN0373.jpg

Maybe 20 or 30 cubic yards of glacial Lake Missoula flood debris dropped some 80 feet into the river. Those rocks had been there at least 12,000 years, perhaps longer.

DSCN0374.jpg

The amount of mud it worked up was substantial.


DSCN0375.jpg

DSCN0380.jpg

One thing this event illustrated is the effects of aqua dynamics and hydraulics. The dirty water kept to the fast moving side of the seam. That margin in the water tension are where fish tend to hold.

DSCN0378.jpg

The river continued to get peppered for the next few hours.

DSCN0385.jpg

In Spite of my best efforts I couldn't manage a hook up. I had the entire hole to myself and fished it like there was no tomorrow. My guess, the slide may have something to do with it!

DSCN0384.jpg

So no catchin' to report just more rocks in the river......
 
Last edited:
Irishrover

Irishrover

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Great post Finger! I would say I can't believe those guys crossing the river but sorry to say you do see some strange stuff out there. That water is only about 39 degrees, hard to swim in if you go down. The rock slide was cool too. I'm thinking that rive is alive. Good pics also.
 
B

bigdog

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Sep 1, 2008
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Portland, Oregon
Love the pics brother Dan sorry you didn't get in to anything but at least you got out there and had a safe day.
 
B

boberdown

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Joined
Jan 19, 2009
Messages
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Location
GRESHAM,OR
Kinda curious, where is the hell hole? How far up from cedar is this hole and do you have to cross the river to get there? It would be awesome if someone could help me out, Thanx.
 
F

FishFinger

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Joined
Jul 27, 2008
Messages
1,217
Location
Central Oregon
Hell Hole is perhaps 300 yds up from the mouth of cedar creek.

In past seasons it was much more defined. Now it's resigned to being a cobble island with the river running through and behind it.

As the flows increase (water diverted behind the cobble bar) it's getting more difficult to cross to it. It's most likely a seasonal thing and when summer levels return access will improve.

I won't be surprised to see additional flow changes as more and more of the cliff begin to sluff off.

Unlike on I**** I won't be stingy about the location(s) of honey holes. expecally those on public lands!

Ok, so the original "landslide drift" doesn't actually exist right now, because the river washed it away in Dec '08 However, the potential for another substantial landslide is great.

Here is what it looked like last fall...

DCP_3100.jpg

DCP_3054.jpg

You can see how the landslide created an amazing stretch of perfect holding water just in time for the Coho run. The resulting change to the river started carving out behind hell hole, sapping it's water supply.

Even though the landslide debris is gone, the river is still cutting a new trough slowly but surely

landslidedivide.jpg
 
L

luv2fish

Member
Joined
Apr 29, 2008
Messages
271
Location
Portland
After a few false starts and weather delays.... I finally got a chance to hit the Sandy yesterday morning.

Started the hike in about 6:30 am. I was amazed at the amount of flood damaged that occurred in the flats, just below the short but steep 3rd down grade. I've been down this trail thousands of times and I hardly recognize it at all.

Trying to navigate the trail among all the down trees and debris was rough. Because it was so dark I totally lost the trail and had to do some serous bushwackin. Finally I made it to the mouth of Cedar Creek about 7:15.

The water was running clear, cold, and fast, perhaps the fastest 10.5 I've seen since the removal or marmot dam. About a dozen other anglers joined me. Several guys thought about crossing but only two did and in chest deep waters.

I put in maybe an hour and a half at the creek seeing only one fish roll and none hooked.

How many guys do you think will be out on this leaner come Coho season...
DSCN0366.jpg


OK, so I bail the mouth and head up to hell hole. The flood increases the cut behind the cobble bar @ Hell hole. Half way across what I thought was a shallower spot, I started second guessing my judgement. Being too far along to turn back, I kept going. If not for my studded Korkers, I would have gone swimming; no doubt about it.

Finally I arrive at Hell hole

DSCN0369.jpg

Granted it only a shadow of its former self, with the landslide being cleared out the flow is starting to return, but a least half the water still flows behind the cobble bar. * the lighter tan area of the opposite bank is all that remains of the landslide.. Its scar for that matter.

Just as I get ready to start drifting some eggs I look down river and see this..
Boy and I thought I picked a bad place to "cross" and I was only going half as far across. It was a painfully slow process as they inched their way across.

DSCN0367.jpg

I have no idea what they were thinking, True enough last fall it was ankle deep there they are standing but not right now!

So I make a few casts and I notice some kayaks coming down river followed by a yellow toon. Being polite I stop and let them pass, as their course was right down the middle of the hole.. As the toon passes I see "Sandy river search and rescue" painted on the side. Talk about great timing.. the guys down stream might just need some help.

By the time they floated down to them the two guys just made it to the other side of the river.

DSCN0370.jpg

So now I can get back to fishing... Suddenly I both hear and feel this low frequency rumble. Initially I thought I was being buzzed by a F-18.

On Sept 12, 2001; Andy and I were fishing near the I-84 bridge over the Sandy. This is when the only planes in the sky were military fighters jets.
Standing there looking up I had a moment of specific clarity.. I'm in that pilots "kill box". I'm one finger twitch away from being "hell fired". How was he to know I wasn't a terrorist setting a charge to destroy an interstate overpass. The hair on the back of my neck still stands on end when I think about it.

Ok back on point here.

A split second later I look up river and see a huge mass of boulders tumble down the slope and into the river. I ran as fast as I could to get my camera; I couldn't catch the landslide in action but I did get the aftermath.

DSCN0372.jpg

DSCN0373.jpg

Maybe 20 or 30 cubic yards of glacial Lake Missoula flood debris dropped some 80 feet into the river. Those rocks had been there at least 12,000 years, perhaps longer.

DSCN0374.jpg

The amount of mud it worked up was substantial.


DSCN0375.jpg

DSCN0380.jpg

One thing this event illustrated is the effects of aqua dynamics and hydraulics. The dirty water kept to the fast moving side of the seam. That margin in the water tension are where fish tend to hold.

DSCN0378.jpg

The river continued to get peppered for the next few hours.

DSCN0385.jpg

In Spite of my best efforts I couldn't manage a hook up. I had the entire hole to myself and fished it like there was no tomorrow. My guess, the slide may have something to do with it!

DSCN0384.jpg

So no catchin' to report just more rocks in the river......


Boy you sure can work for Discovery or NGC;)
 
F

FishSchooler

Active member
Joined
Mar 29, 2008
Messages
1,779
Location
Oregon
It is very cool how you can literally see into that cliff's history... thousands of layers of sediment... Better bring a saw and cut me a tiny stick of it... not... :lol: :whistle:
 
N

ninja2010

1
Joined
May 12, 2008
Messages
877
Location
river right/left
dang ff, that's kinda close... glad you were safe, though.landslides can sometimes be very unpredictable with gravel showers and shockwaves loosening surrounding areas triggering chain reaction.

thanks for a great report.
 
M

meluvtrout

Active member
Joined
Aug 26, 2008
Messages
403
Don't worry, we'll make up for it next weekend. Although I like the idea of being warm in neoprene waders, after a miserable hike for 1.5 miles down and then "up" a 45 degree steep hill in search for the almighty steelhead, I bit the bullet and just got myself some new breathable waders. We've got some exploring to do...
 
F

Fishtopher

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 12, 2008
Messages
1,274
Location
Who knows?! Not me!
Dan, the guy in the pics, not you or Andy...who is that guy?...I think I know him. Is he in the construction trade? I used to work for a siding company, and it seems that is where the face is familiar from...maybe a framer or something??...Everytime you post a pic with him in it, it drives me nuts, I just can't figure it out...:think::wall::wall::wall:
 

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