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Thread: Surf fishing

  1. #1

    Surf fishing

    Has anybody here fished in the surf with a fly rod or conventional gear? I'm interested in getting into this method of fishing the salt and would like to know your tips and tricks. I'd like to know what flies/bait/lure set ups you use as well as some good spots to go around Newport/Lincoln City. I don't expect anyone to tell me their secret spot or anything, I just don't want to find myself fishing in front of a hotel watching kites fly over my head.

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
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    The bait of choice I hear everyone say is sand shrimp, which is supposed to catch everything. But I've caught the rockfish on swimbaits, grubs, and worms, or in other words anything you might catch a fresh water bass on. Same thing for lingcod only they prefer bigger baits.

    As far as locations go, I've actually never had any luck "surf" fishing. I've tried it, and would love to find success and figure the whole thing out but for now I've found my best luck with the jetties in Newport, or Fisher's Rock south of Lincoln city. The beach at Fogarty creek park (just south of Fisher's Rock) looks inviting and has kelp beds real close to shore the whole length of the beach, and while I have yet to catch anything I can only imagine it's great perch and greenling habitat.

    There's also Boiler Bay and the rocks near Depoe Bay which you can fish off of, and have heard of people having good success.

  3. #3
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    surf fishing

    I have been surf fishing for a long time - it's what I do between salmon runs-
    I fish for red tail surf perch and it can be a lot of fun - here's how and where:
    I use 2 rigs : a 8' - 6" salmon rod or a 10' Ugli Stick - spinning or casting reel will work , if you use a level wind be carefull not to get sand in the rewind screw or it will wreck it good ! bait - I use 2 #2 hooks spaced 12" apart- and this is the important part , ABOVE THE LEAD , NOT BELOW - regular old worms
    or clam necks work great and they stay on the hooks - they are schooling fish - find one and there are a lot more in the same spot - if you see seals running in the surf , perch are there -it is amazing how close to the sand they get , I have hooked them in 6" of water - it is not a casting contest -
    walk a beach at low tide and look for cutouts and depessions in the sand, fish those spots at high tide - I were chest waders and run out between breakers to cast - it is a risky game ; sneakers and logs can end your fishing days- favorite beaches - Cape Lookout State Park , the north jetty at Tillamook ( ocean side , not bay side ) south jetty next to the parking lot at Fort Stevens State Park ( Astoria ) - they are tasty - I throw 3-5 oz. depeding on how heavy the surf is - check your regs. on limits - I once caught 10 in 10min. - they are a strange fish and they look tropical - they average 1-3 lbs. --

  4. #4
    Great! Thanks a lot guys. I'll be trying this out on Sunday.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cchinook View Post
    I use 2 #2 hooks spaced 12" apart- and this is the important part , ABOVE THE LEAD , NOT BELOW--
    Is the main reason for that having the weight below the hooks mostly for casting reasons or is there another reason why not to use a sliding rig where the line is free to move through the weight. I've always felt the sliding rig had a more natural presentation as the bait isn't held so rigidly in the water, and the fish can pick up the bait with out feeling the weight or the line nearly so much, but I haven't really caught much of anything on either setup yet.

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    In Hawaii, we use the same setup with the weight at the bottom for surf fishing (aka dunking). The theory to why we would put the weight at the bottom is to allow the bait to be off the bottom. Also, so that if the weight were to settle and snag something, we would just lose the weight and not everything else. Another benefit is that a bottom weight allowed for extremely long distance casting (around 200-300 ft). Once again, that's Hawaii stuff, but I would assume it would pertain to surf fishing here.
    ~Geoff~
    The seemingly eternal student

  7. #7
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    lead on the bottom

    the main reason is for presentation - lead on the bottom keeps your bait up
    out of the sand - remember you are dealing with strong breakers - fish finder rigs are great , but not in the surf -

  8. #8
    can you catch anything from south beach in newport? if so, how?

  9. #9
    Super Moderator Top Author Raincatcher's Avatar
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    Wink lead bottom...

    Quote Originally Posted by cchinook View Post
    the main reason is for presentation - lead on the bottom keeps your bait up
    out of the sand - remember you are dealing with strong breakers - fish finder rigs are great , but not in the surf -
    Ok,cchinook,I have a question. Is there any reason that same set-up won't work in a lot of other situations? I mean, Hanapaa said the casting distance is 200-300 feet! I have trouble with casting distance since the shoulder surgery, sometimes 50 feet seems pretty darn good. Are there any regs against using that set-up? Seems like a pretty good idea to me.
    Barb

    Be safe out there
    ​Barb













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    sorry to ask but i am just geting started with surf fishing and i have not made my first trip yet but in the morning i am heading to Depoe bay is there a good place near by ??????

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    Quote Originally Posted by Raincatcher View Post
    Ok,cchinook,I have a question. Is there any reason that same set-up won't work in a lot of other situations? I mean, Hanapaa said the casting distance is 200-300 feet! I have trouble with casting distance since the shoulder surgery, sometimes 50 feet seems pretty darn good. Are there any regs against using that set-up? Seems like a pretty good idea to me.
    Barb
    Yes, Barb, you can't put the weight BELOW the hook in many/most freshwater rigs. It's up front in the bait/hook section of the regulations.

  13. #13
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    I use a 9' heavy salmon rod with a 4000-sized spinning reel, 10lb braided line to 2 - 3ft, 10# mono leader. Depending on the surf, I'll use between a 2oz - 4oz weight (the rod max's out at 4oz). I prefer to use a single #2 octopus hook, but have used two #4 hooks. No real reason I go down in hook size, but #4's are big enough. I've never hooked a double - or seen anyone catch them two-at-a-time - so the second hook seems superfluous to me...

    I have the best luck on the hook that's 12"-14" above the weight on calm days, and 16"-18" up on days with heavier surf.

    Most days I'll use regular pyramid weights, but when there's a lot of loose kelp, I find the cannon ball or bass casting (bell) shape tends to snag less kelp.

    I don't tie the hooks directly to the line. I use 8lb mono to snell the hooks and tie them on with a surgeon's knot. I'd rather lose a hook than a weight.

    Sand shrimp or mussels work well. I suck at catching sand shrimp and often use 2" or 2" sections of Berkley Gulp sandworms - which work, but nowhere near as well as bait.

    I've always chased countours in the sand, but lately I've seen folks limiting out in the flattest, least fishy-looking beaches I've seen. I'd never fish them, but others seem to be doing fine. It seems to be more important to avoid the rips than to fish the contours - right now, at least.

    You only need to cast a bit beyond the furthest break, so 200-foot casts aren't necessary. It's usually 50-feet.

    Oh! And never take C-Run perch-fishing with you. He'll catch all the fish.
    Last edited by Tinker; 08-24-2013 at 06:45 AM.

  14. #14
    Get some of these...



    Then get Tinker to go fishing with you because he knows where the fish are.

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    Thumbs up

    The Crawdads live much longer if'n you keep them in water......
    on a mountain west of Wolf Creek...

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    I usually use a sliding sinker on a holder, with leader below. I use for bait squid, Pileworms, Bloodworms, cut anchovie, with some thread wrapped around sometimes...
    on a mountain west of Wolf Creek...

  17. #17
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    I tried surf fishing @ newport today and got skunked big time :( can anyone share some secret locations with me?
    are they found along all the beach in oregon? I read you need to find a steep slope beach, but I've driven around the newport area and I don't see any. it's mostly flat beaches.

    also, sand shrimp falls off WAAAY to easily. any other baits that will stay on longer?



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